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I bought a SawStop JSS-MCA

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Review by Dark_Lightning posted 02-23-2016 04:23 AM 6446 views 1 time favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch
I bought a SawStop JSS-MCA No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I bought it today, after I found out that the Bosch REAXX GTS1041A isn’t going to be available for awhile yet, and I wanted to get a safer saw now, not whenever. The point of this post is to look at positive solutions you have come up with for MY alleged problems with the saw I just bought. That said-

#1. The miter gauge is loose in the slots. (.010” “slop”). Yes, I know it is a contractor’s saw (edit to add- yes that is a Job Site Saw). I had expected better, but what the hell, I am one picky guy about tolerances. I have an Incra 1000 HD Miter gauge. Problem solved. #2. The distance between the front edge of the table and the starting edge of the cutting of the blade is shorter than that of my last saw. I’ll be working on a sled that will obviate that problem. What did YOU do to mitigate this?

I’ll ask more questions about his saw as I discover differences between my expectations and what failures I made in my research that made this saw different from my expectations. Please, I just want positive solutions to my perceived problems.

-- Random Orbital Nailer




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Dark_Lightning

3187 posts in 3189 days



26 comments so far

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Tennessee

2876 posts in 2594 days


#1 posted 02-23-2016 12:10 PM

I don’t own this saw, but I have a couple questions:

Did you get a chance to look at one of these before you bought? And if you did, was that miter loose or did you possibly just get a bad one?

The other question is one that I have wondered about. Since this is a contractor’s saw, it seems that the likelihood of having to cut damp or at least high moisture dimensional lumber is very high. It is not unusual for a contractor to get to a site and find that it rained the night before, without the structure being closed in, or the load of lumber was dumped by the supplier and maybe tarped, maybe not. Either way, what does SawStop say about cutting lumber that is damp or with a very high moisture content either on the surface from the weather, or just because it was a fast growth tree that was taken as soon as possible? Will it trigger the safety mechanism?

Thanks in advance…

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 1009 days


#2 posted 02-23-2016 02:16 PM



I don t own this saw, but I have a couple questions:

Did you get a chance to look at one of these before you bought? And if you did, was that miter loose or did you possibly just get a bad one?

The other question is one that I have wondered about. Since this is a contractor s saw, it seems that the likelihood of having to cut damp or at least high moisture dimensional lumber is very high. It is not unusual for a contractor to get to a site and find that it rained the night before, without the structure being closed in, or the load of lumber was dumped by the supplier and maybe tarped, maybe not. Either way, what does SawStop say about cutting lumber that is damp or with a very high moisture content either on the surface from the weather, or just because it was a fast growth tree that was taken as soon as possible? Will it trigger the safety mechanism?

Thanks in advance…

- Tennessee

Cutting very wet wood above a certain moisture content can set off the saw. Also, just because it’s a “Jobsite” saw doesnt mean that it will be exposed to “Jobsite” conditions. You don’t have to be a contractor to buy or own a contractor or jobsite saw…..

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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johnstoneb

2987 posts in 2252 days


#3 posted 02-23-2016 02:21 PM

Do you have the contractors saw or the jobsite saw. The picture you posted is the jobsite saw. I have the contractor’s saw. I have not seen the perceived problems you seem to have. I had an Incra miter guage so just put that on the saw because has the adjustment to tighten in the miter slot. The table is the same size as the 113 craftsman I replaced. That seems to be pretty close to the industry standard.

Tennessee: Sawstop says high moisture will set the cartridge off and you can bypass the safety if you need to.
In bypass mode if the material is to wet the saw will shut down.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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Dark_Lightning

3187 posts in 3189 days


#4 posted 02-23-2016 03:29 PM



Do you have the contractors saw or the jobsite saw. The picture you posted is the jobsite saw. I have the contractor s saw. I have not seen the perceived problems you seem to have. I had an Incra miter guage so just put that on the saw because has the adjustment to tighten in the miter slot. The table is the same size as the 113 craftsman I replaced. That seems to be pretty close to the industry standard.

Tennessee: Sawstop says high moisture will set the cartridge off and you can bypass the safety if you need to.
In bypass mode if the material is to wet the saw will shut down.

- johnstoneb

I updated my original post to clarify that it is the Job Site Saw. This saw is going to be a “princess” in the garage, not taken to job sites. I want it for cutting dry wood only. The fact that I can stow it also helps, in my tiny work space.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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MrRon

4916 posts in 3323 days


#5 posted 02-23-2016 05:03 PM

Job site or contractors saws were not designed to do precision work. Sure you can use them everywhere, but don’t expect it to perform like a cabinet saw. You can work around some of the short comings of those saws by creative solutions, but it will never replace all the positive attributes of a full featured cabinet saw.

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Dark_Lightning

3187 posts in 3189 days


#6 posted 02-23-2016 07:57 PM

Looks like I made a mistake, then. I’ll overcome that with carefully made sleds. Unfortunately, I just do not have the room for a cabinet saw. If I did, that is what I would have bought.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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bbasiaga

1239 posts in 2075 days


#7 posted 02-23-2016 09:26 PM

On my brother’s example of this saw, the fence is very straight, repeatable and accurate. The saw blade is very well aligned with the miter slot, it holds its elevation and angles very well. He built a cross cut sled right away, so I don’t know about his miter gauge. It can produce very accurate, repeatable work. It does have some shortcomings compared to models with larger tables and heavier bases, but to say it can’t do precision work is incorrect.

I don’t think you made a mistake, or preempted any future excellent projects. You just made some tradeoffs to save space. World of difference there.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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CyberDyneSystems

288 posts in 2268 days


#8 posted 02-23-2016 09:52 PM

One of my first purchases as a contractor back int eh 1980’s was a tiny P.O.S. bench-top direct drive table saw, for about $150.00 new in a clearance dept. It truly was about the worst “tablesaw” ever made. And yet, with some patience and set up, it was my only table saw for about 3 years, and I forced it to do the job of a cabinet saw on a few occasions.

First stop was as you did, made a very good custom sled for accurate cross cutting.

Next was an improved fence solution, the stock one was in fact useless. For me this was simply an “L” or “angle iron” shaped fence made from good quality cabinet grade play that I could clamp in place.

Auxiliary in-feed, outfeed and left of the fence support was next, I used a system of home made custom built wooden horses to hold everything at the right height and allow me to push 4×8 sheets of plywood through this tiny saw.

It lasted until i gave it away with the sled to a small theatre that was soldiering on trying to do rip cuts with a Craftsman Radial Arm Saw (scary!!!)

The worst incident I had with it was in fact one of those times I was trying to use it to cut plywood,. very painful kickback in the gut. that the little POS saw could move a heavy sheet of plywood that hard was a surprise,. and I’ll never try that again with a bench-top saw. Instead I went back to the tried and true “Sawhorses, straight edge and good quality handheld circular saw” for panel cutting on location. If you have any aspiration for working with panels, I’d look into the modern equivalent, a track saw for that, and don;t try to use the benchtop saw.

Being a “table saw guy” I can’t imagine life without a cabinet saw now,. I have a 1940’s unisaw in the basement, and a industrial SawStop at work.

-- Without the wood, it's just working

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CyberDyneSystems

288 posts in 2268 days


#9 posted 02-23-2016 09:59 PM

As for fitting a miter gauge, even with old glorious Unisaws of yore, we used to have to “fit” the miter gauge to the slot. Now you can buy them with adjustable widths, but one used to use a punch and hammer to enlarge spots on the side of the miter gauge rail until it was a better fit.

a nice video to show the trick;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upoJVkYJHKM

-- Without the wood, it's just working

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3187 posts in 3189 days


#10 posted 02-24-2016 02:58 AM


One of my first purchases as a contractor back int eh 1980 s was a tiny P.O.S. bench-top direct drive table saw, for about $150.00 new in a clearance dept. It truly was about the worst “tablesaw” ever made. And yet, with some patience and set up, it was my only table saw for about 3 years, and I forced it to do the job of a cabinet saw on a few occasions.

First stop was as you did, made a very good custom sled for accurate cross cutting.

Next was an improved fence solution, the stock one was in fact useless. For me this was simply an “L” or “angle iron” shaped fence made from good quality cabinet grade play that I could clamp in place.

Auxiliary in-feed, outfeed and left of the fence support was next, I used a system of home made custom built wooden horses to hold everything at the right height and allow me to push 4×8 sheets of plywood through this tiny saw.

It lasted until i gave it away with the sled to a small theatre that was soldiering on trying to do rip cuts with a Craftsman Radial Arm Saw (scary!!!)

The worst incident I had with it was in fact one of those times I was trying to use it to cut plywood,. very painful kickback in the gut. that the little POS saw could move a heavy sheet of plywood that hard was a surprise,. and I ll never try that again with a bench-top saw. Instead I went back to the tried and true “Sawhorses, straight edge and good quality handheld circular saw” for panel cutting on location. If you have any aspiration for working with panels, I d look into the modern equivalent, a track saw for that, and don;t try to use the benchtop saw.

Being a “table saw guy” I can t imagine life without a cabinet saw now,. I have a 1940 s unisaw in the basement, and a industrial SawStop at work.

- CyberDyneSystems

I had an old RAS that would wander when I made cuts. Sold it for scrap. Some call that sacrilege, I call it making sure I have square cuts.

I checked blade runout today. .002” TIR. As I get time, I will check for parallel of the blade and the tracks. I’m expecting it to be good, as it is brand new. But I will still check, because that is how I am. The old table saw I had dialed in to within .004”. I need to get some HDPE to make slides for the cross cut sled. Picking that up tomorrow.

Maybe I should start another thread, but let’s see how it goes with a question here, before I do. Has anyone here put an Incra fence on their SawStop? I got one cheap, it is all there and works. But the guys at WoodCraft didn’t know about doing that.

Oh, yeah- I have a long clamping bar from that I use for sheet goods. I saw that the guys demonstrating the saw were cutting a sheet of plywood, but I’m not going to do that.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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htl

3997 posts in 1239 days


#11 posted 02-24-2016 03:37 AM

Here’s what I did to help the fence.
It’s for the Dewalt but still should help.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/171410

-- Learn More About Making Wooden Models. An Index Of My Model making Blogs. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

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loupitou06

137 posts in 3406 days


#12 posted 02-24-2016 04:54 AM

Hi,

I hope I can help with your second problem. I have used a Bosh 4100 for many years and initially suffered from the same issue of having too little room in front of the blade. Most cross-cut sleds are designed for cabinet saws with more space in front of the blade.

However I found that this particular design of cross-cut sled to work very well with your constrain – I no longer own the Bosch 4100 so I can’t share the picture of the sled but here is a picture I found online :

I used 1/2 plywood for the base, a hardwood runner and a jointed piece of hardwood for the “fence”, you build it larger that necessary and then trim it with the blade you use most and now you lead the wood by the fence to the blade. Once the wood is past the blade, the sled supports it.

Let me know if you need more details

-- 100 fois sur le metier remettez votre ouvrage

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3187 posts in 3189 days


#13 posted 02-26-2016 01:51 AM



I don t own this saw, but I have a couple questions:

Did you get a chance to look at one of these before you bought? And if you did, was that miter loose or did you possibly just get a bad one?

The other question is one that I have wondered about. Since this is a contractor s saw, it seems that the likelihood of having to cut damp or at least high moisture dimensional lumber is very high. It is not unusual for a contractor to get to a site and find that it rained the night before, without the structure being closed in, or the load of lumber was dumped by the supplier and maybe tarped, maybe not. Either way, what does SawStop say about cutting lumber that is damp or with a very high moisture content either on the surface from the weather, or just because it was a fast growth tree that was taken as soon as possible? Will it trigger the safety mechanism?

Thanks in advance…

- Tennessee

ooops- looks I didn’t respond to you directly. I didn’t check that the miter gauge fit well. Guess I had stars in my eyes at the moment. Anyway, I have an Incra 1000 HD miter gauge that I adjusted to fit the slots. I did have to dress the ends of the slots with a mill file to let the miter gauge pass with minimal interference. Any work I do, I don’t want the wood to wiggle around and end up with worse saw marks than necessary, even if I do have a drum sander to clean the marks up. The miter gauge would resist at the ends, and I took off from .006” to .010” to clean them up, but only at the very ends, maybe half inch in from the edge. That would be from the forming process, I guess, or maybe excess powder coat at the edges. The miter gauge slides like butter across the entire range, so I’m good. I’m making a sled so that I will be able to have a longer entry to the start of the blade. The first cuts I wanted to make with my new saw, I could not do, because the pieces are 9-5/8” wide- the width of my new carving tool chest. I think I mentioned 9-3/8” elsewhere, that is a typo.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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ThomasPittman

39 posts in 1902 days


#14 posted 02-26-2016 02:55 AM

I agree with a few of the above comments. I’ve looked at this saw and was told the same. It has the Sawstop brake technology, but its a jobsite saw. You can use it wherever you want, but its still classed as a jobsite saw, which is designed to certain specs, which is not comparable with high price cabinet saws. If the cheaper saw was as good as the expensive saws, who would buy the expensive ones?

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dday

155 posts in 1509 days


#15 posted 02-26-2016 02:17 PM

That has been the problems with all three contractor/job site saws that I have owned. I just don’t have room in my 9’ x 9’ shop for anything bigger. You have to either adjust your miter gauge with tape or pinging of dress the slot to make it smoother. I’ve not have any that didn’t wiggle from the factory. The fences are finicky at best, horrible at worst, and I’m always jealous of the youtubers who can slide the fence to the tape for a X inch cut. :)
The short throat has always been an issue too, one that I’ve not found a solution to. Making a sled doesn’t really work, but less than half of it is supported when pulled out in front of the blade….

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