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Hand-operated scroll saw AKA fret saw

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Review by Dutchy posted 02-18-2016 10:10 PM 2822 views 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Hand-operated scroll saw AKA fret saw No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

This is my first review contribution. Today I bought a well known brand hand operated scroll saw at the local hardware store for only Euro 6.50, with a full year warranty. It was cheap but despite this it has some nice benefits That’s why I want to share it with you. This saw is very environmentally friendly. It is usable in country’s with 230 volt but also in country’s where 110 Volt is used. It’s light weight but with sufficient strength. Saw blade change is easy to do without additional tools. It’s cordless and has variable speed. The depth of throat is about 10”. The angle can be easy changed by tilting the handle. More power can be obtained by hand. I’m more than satisfied and that’s why have gave it 5 stars.

Thanks for reading. I hope you enjoyed it.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/




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Dutchy

2752 posts in 2074 days



15 comments so far

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kiefer

5618 posts in 2573 days


#1 posted 02-19-2016 12:01 AM

I had one of those and I think it was my first tool at age seven or eight it was called a Laubsaege .(That should be spelled with an umlaut .)
This saw is still a good saw to own and if could find one in this country I would buy it .
As to power I would say it belongs in the cordless category .

Klaus

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

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DocSavage45

8459 posts in 2748 days


#2 posted 02-19-2016 04:17 AM

LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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crowie

2262 posts in 1857 days


#3 posted 02-19-2016 05:07 AM

Top marks for a great tool review Jan….. and YES I’m laughing long & loud….well done, sir

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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Dutchy

2752 posts in 2074 days


#4 posted 02-19-2016 07:09 AM

Klaus I got my first one when I was about the same age you got him. I did a lot with it. Maybe ten years ago he was rusty and I threw him away. In our country it is know as a figuurzaag. I’m guessing you can understand this word. Thomas and Crowie Glad to hear you had some fun.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

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TheFridge

8893 posts in 1392 days


#5 posted 02-19-2016 07:18 AM

I enjoy a good funny amd a good tool.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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madts

1842 posts in 2245 days


#6 posted 02-19-2016 10:26 AM

The nice thing about it is, that it will run all weekend long, on just a cheese sandwich.

=Madts.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

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stefang

15784 posts in 3240 days


#7 posted 02-19-2016 05:14 PM

Some very fine work can be done with a saw like this Jan. The problem I have found with my Excalibur scroll saw is that the finest blades tend to break very easy due to the minimum speed not being low enough, causing more heat and also issues of maneuverability (for me at least).

Another approach is to take your hand saw and make it into a hand or foot powered scroll saw with a tilting table (optional) similar to the one in this link. It is powered using a drawer slider with a handle to pull the blade down by hand and a spring to pull it back up. The handle can also be attached to a foot pedal with a cable which allows the operator to use one hand to hold the workpiece down and the other to guide the cut.

The blade moves very slowly like in a chevalet which allows very fine work to be done with the smallest blades. One big advantage is that unlike the chevalet the pieces do not fall on the floor as often happens with a chevalet and it is also easy to mount a lighted magifying glass to make it much easier to follow the pattern lines more closely while cutting.

The throat opening can also be increased by adding some extenders to your hand saw arms (the arms are cut in the middle, their ends pinched, and hols drilled through the pinched ends and then bolted to the two straight extension pieces which are also pinched together and drilled at their ends).

Just and idea if you are interested. The tilting table mentioned above would allow you to cut marquetry on an angle to completely eliminate any gaps, but personally I don’t think that is necessary when very fine blades are used (#2/0 or finer for example). There are many of these homemade scroll saws in use by marquetry artists in the USA and they do some wonderful work with them. Either way I look forward to seeing what you will do with this new saw.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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Dutchy

2752 posts in 2074 days


#8 posted 02-20-2016 06:36 PM

Thanks all.

Mike maybe there will be a time I buy a power driven scrollsaw. Thanks all.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

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LittleBlackDuck

1601 posts in 726 days


#9 posted 04-11-2016 01:21 AM

Dutchy, a very entertaining presentation. Who said Dutchmen don’t have a sense of humour?

(Got this link from your Dump Truck… you cannot hide!)

... In our country it is know as a figuurzaag. I’m guessing…
You’ve just summed up the difference between my girlfriend and wife… Girlfriend has a figuur and the wife is a zaag.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Dutchy

2752 posts in 2074 days


#10 posted 04-11-2016 07:00 AM

Alex thanks and last week I bought a Excalibur 16.

BTW Be careful with your saw.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

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LittleBlackDuck

1601 posts in 726 days


#11 posted 04-11-2016 07:21 AM

And I suppose next week you’ll have the electricity connected. I have an Excalibur too (pinched it off King Arthur)... Great saw (have the 18) and I’m positive you will love it, however, I’m sure you’ll find that the thumb screws are a pain, literally.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Dutchy

2752 posts in 2074 days


#12 posted 04-11-2016 07:59 AM

Last week I also build a stand with drawers for my new toy. I have tried him already and I was suprissed by how clean the cut was. GREAT. There is however a greater disadvantage on this saw than the thumb screw and that is the fact that all bolts and scews arn’t metric. That is a “big” problem. The time that you could buy fractional wrenches and so on is far behind. When my thumb screw is broken it is hard to find a new one or at least for a acceptable price. It amazes me that the power cord is european and the voltage is 240.
Selling a machine with fractional bolts in europe is stupid and as a supplier you will never be taken seriously, despite your machine is good.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

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LittleBlackDuck

1601 posts in 726 days


#13 posted 04-11-2016 10:33 AM

Unfortunately the Excalibur is American and there is no one else on Earth other than the Yanks. They love their imperial while the rest of the world has to take a step backwards “to comply”. I found that I couldn’t buy satisfactory knobs for the Excalibur in Australia and one of the reliable American suppliers won’t ship outside USA (with the exception of Canada). I had to set up a USA address, get it delivered there and have them send it to me…. at an extra cost, but at least I got it.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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crowie

2262 posts in 1857 days


#14 posted 02-16-2017 08:25 AM

Now Dutchy I have had my good laugh for today – top review sir, thank you…AGAIN!!!

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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Neilson

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#15 posted 05-17-2017 09:27 AM

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