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A worth while track saw consideration

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Review by Holbs posted 11-30-2015 06:32 AM 5086 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
A worth while track saw consideration A worth while track saw consideration A worth while track saw consideration Click the pictures to enlarge them

There are track saws, and there are track saws. For a $200 estimated price tag, this Grizzly T10687 does it’s job wonderfully. This is similar to Sheppach and other European clones of this economical track saw type, but is Grizzly :) It has a riving knife, it plunges, 9 amp motor, dust port, has a 100% functional depth knob, no wobble in the track. All knobs are plastic, but that hard plastic, not the flimsy type. I can easily plunge it with one hand reaching across 4’ plywood panel. I would give it 5 stars, except the dust collection is average. The track itself is great and has 3 strip “gripper” material on the underside. You can get the accessory pack of clamps, but I have yet to really use them because those underside grippers work great. There are complaints the green sliding material is too close together (easily modified to relocate the strips) but I have not found a need to. Easily went to work on 3 4’x8’ 3/4” plywood this Sunday with no problems (I need a longer shop vac hose so did not use dust collection this time around). I am still using the Grizzly factory blade with I have had surprising good results. Always the option to swap out to Diablo’s later.
This is NOT a Festool or Dewalt or a $500 track saw. It is a $200 affordable track saw from Grizzly (plus $50+ for the track rail). My use of this tool is to break down sheet goods, not to rip 4/4 iron wood :)
Grizzly page for tracksaw
Amazon page for tracksaw

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter




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Holbs

1795 posts in 1933 days



10 comments so far

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Tedstor

1643 posts in 2536 days


#1 posted 11-30-2015 12:38 PM

Thanks for the review.
How’s the accuracy? Is it good enough to build cabinets/cases/built-ins? Do you find yourself re-cutting your sheet goods on the table saw? Or does the track saw get your cuts close enough?

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Holbs

1795 posts in 1933 days


#2 posted 11-30-2015 03:00 PM

The accuracy is 100% spot on. That black edging strip to the right you see in the track picture is your guide. Foolproof. I would much prefer a cabinet saw for repeatable cuts and ease of use. Setting up for accuracy means you have to have patience and double check the lineups.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 1080 days


#3 posted 11-30-2015 03:02 PM

Thanks for the review. I have been considering this saw for rough breaking down of sheet goods (prior to running through the table saw).

One of the complaints other reviews have is the chipping along the cut line. What is your opinion?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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Tedstor

1643 posts in 2536 days


#4 posted 11-30-2015 03:13 PM



The accuracy is 100% spot on. That black edging strip to the right you see in the track picture is your guide. Foolproof. I would much prefer a cabinet saw for repeatable cuts and ease of use. Setting up for accuracy means you have to have patience and double check the lineups.

- Holbs

Thanks for the reply. I have a contractor saw with limited rip capacity…..so I’ve been considering a track saw to supplement the table saw, particularly with sheetgoods and panels. I’ve been waiting for the Makita to drop to $325-350, but that apparently will never happen. So less expensive options are now up for consideration.

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Holbs

1795 posts in 1933 days


#5 posted 11-30-2015 03:13 PM

You can see in the above picture using the STOCK Grizzly saw blade. JMARTEL has home brewed modifications for zero clearance cuts with even more impressive results.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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Holbs

1795 posts in 1933 days


#6 posted 11-30-2015 03:15 PM

Ted, I am in the same boat with a Bosch 4100: limited rip capacity. I would use a track saw to rough cut sheet goods and then finish off on a cabinet saw (that’s the plan til I get a cabinet saw). Luckily, this track saw works great albeit takes a lot more time to set up for precision cut after cut.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1263 posts in 1127 days


#7 posted 12-01-2015 02:55 AM

What is the max thickness of wood that can be cut?
Also, is the cut good enough that it could cut 2 pieces straight enough to glue up?

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Holbs

1795 posts in 1933 days


#8 posted 12-01-2015 05:11 AM

Max cutting depth without rail 2-5/32”, with rail 1-31/32”.
With a better blade than the stock one I’m using, and with JMARTEL’s modification I would say yes you can glue up 2 pieces.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View bkseitz's profile

bkseitz

295 posts in 1213 days


#9 posted 12-01-2015 06:13 AM

Thanks for the review. Have been researching guide rails and tracksaws the past few years when I decided not to invest in a panel saw and just breakdown my sheet stock on my assembly table or using my contractor saw I upgraded with sliding and outfeed tables. I think the Grizzly you suggest may do the trick for quick breakdown on my assembly bench -thx

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

View NormG's profile

NormG

5900 posts in 2907 days


#10 posted 12-05-2015 06:40 AM

Thank you for the review

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

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