LumberJocks

I just don't get it anymore.

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Review by PatrickB posted 10-11-2015 01:23 AM 5594 views 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
I just don't get it anymore. No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Update:
It was mentioned in a review I wrote about another tool that it took me 20 years before I wrote a review and that as far as he was concerned what I say doesn’t really count. So I thought I would update why it took so long to write my review. I have always been very happy with this tool. It’s done plenty of studs and joists and decks. Cut just great and runs like a champ. My only complaint arose the one time I do not have a table saw and I had to make some precision on a project I was building for my son. That is when I ran into issues that I felt needed to be brought up, that I could n0t get the saw to zero in two plains, I can have a straight cut and no forty five degree or I can have a forty five degree and no straight cut. That is the my only issue with this saw. My apologies for not have had this issue up until now.
Thanks
Pat

I have had this saw for a long time, 20years? Right around there maybe even longer. Still runs strong, bearings are all tight and all of that. Maybe I’m stupid? I mean when I get into one of my moods I can’t be taught a thing. I never really used it for super precise cuts or anything like that. Used it to shorten a board or maybe help cut and fit some window treatment but never anything I wood (pun intended) consider as being of high quality. a fancy box something like that. And I have pretty much given up on woodworking as I don’t have the time or the patience it takes to really get into. I’ve tried on and off for over 25 years. Drives my wife ape crap. But this is just one of those tools you don’t sell, if you know what I mean?
Pat

Ok, on to the review. It’s always run when I wanted it too and stopped when I let go of the switch, pretty important stuff right there! Slides easily on the bushings and there is a knob (not me) in back that can set how much effort it takes to pull/push the saw. Works good (the knob, not me) and is kind of a neat touch really. There’s a handle just behind the knob (will you stop it? Not me!) that will set how easily it will tilt and act as another lock for tilting. I’ve even cut aluminum with this saw (8020 extruded) and it hasn’t had a problem, with the proper blade because, well I’m not a knob.

So, onto the three star rating. Last couple of days I’ve been working on a simple (ha!) guitar stand for my son. He always wanted some of my old cutting board wood that wasn’t quiet big enough for a cutting board and I really couldn’t figure out a way to work it into something that would be worth doing and then I was watching “I built it” or something like that and saw a guitar stand that was made and I thought “cool, I’ll use that for the base, problem solved.” and I was happy. But I wanted to put a nice soft maple or maybe spalted maple frame around the cutting board remnant so I broke out the saw. Thought I better tune it up and get everything centered and all of that to make some nice accurate cuts, bevel and straight. On to youtube and look at some videos about setting up my saw just to see how other folks were doing it and it’s still the same way. But one fellow was using a piece of wood with a dial indicator on it and two screws in the end to use for setting the indicator. But to use his method you need a wide (5/8”?) 90 degree square which I don’t have. Back to my way which is a machinist square with a short blade against the saw blade. Got my horizontal and vertical zeroed in for straight cuts. -1 star, one of the screws was stripped, and mind now, I never checked the set up on it so why is this screw stripped? Don’t know. Anyway made some cuts and they were good. Switched to a 45 degree cut and it was bad. -1 star. Actually ended up at 46 degrees so I went to the other side of the saw and it was 44 degrees. Then I thought, I’ll us the side bevel that I just set for center and it was off by one degree too. Sigh…...

Ok, that’s it, all I’ve got to say, didn’t mean to be so wordy. If you fell asleep before finishing this next time you can’t sleep jus start over. Maybe I should put this at the front?

-- Really? Really? How important is it?




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PatrickB

53 posts in 2943 days



15 comments so far

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Combo Prof

3502 posts in 1273 days


#1 posted 10-11-2015 12:01 PM

When you say:

Funny, almost all of my tools have slowly begun to transform from yellow and black to red and black.

Do you mean “Stanley Black and Decker” which now owns Dewalt or do you mean Milwaukee which seems to be be the preferred tools of our local contractors?

Concerning Dewalt and perhaps all of the remaining makers of small power tools it seems to vary from tool to tool and no longer is it possible to have good tools and have a single color shop. For the larger tools (table saws, bandsaws, etc.) I suggest you only buy tools made before 1950.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan .. Soon Holland, Michigan)

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2767 posts in 2292 days


#2 posted 10-11-2015 01:10 PM

You couldn’t dial in a twenty year old tool and give it a bad review. Have you determined if it’s the castings or stops or your technique? Dewalt doesn’t make junk.

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

3502 posts in 1273 days


#3 posted 10-11-2015 01:22 PM


You couldn t dial in a twenty year old tool and give it a bad review. Have you determined if it s the castings or stops or your technique? Dewalt doesn t make junk.

- dhazelton

Dewalt didn’t used to make junk, but now that it was bought by black and decker and some of the tools are made elsewhere it is not so clear.

However you are correct. Its a little odd to give a review of a 20 year old tool that has had all sorts of unknown abuse a bad review without investigating what has happened to it.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan .. Soon Holland, Michigan)

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5423 posts in 3658 days


#4 posted 10-12-2015 12:36 AM

Dewalt didn’t used to make junk, but now that it was bought by black and decker and some of the tools are made elsewhere it is not so clear.

Black and Decker acquired DeWalt in 1960. DeWalt ceased too manufacturing in the USA in 2002.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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misterChips

63 posts in 1283 days


#5 posted 10-12-2015 12:48 AM

I under stand where you are coming from as i have a 12 inch double compound sliding miter saw, it’s only 3 years old and I do not use it that much. For me I use my radial arm saw more than any other tool in my shop.

-- Don't only practice your art, but force your way in to its secrets... Ludwig Von Beethoven.

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emart

445 posts in 2623 days


#6 posted 10-12-2015 03:38 AM



For the larger tools (table saws, bandsaws, etc.) I suggest you only buy tools made before 1950.

- Combo Prof

I’d say anything from 1940 to 1966 will do fine. There’s still some decent stuff in the 70s but it’s more hit and miss.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View Bill1974's profile

Bill1974

124 posts in 2981 days


#7 posted 10-12-2015 04:16 PM

Are you sure you have a DW717? It can’t be 20 years old when it was released on 2008.

I have the same saw and it have been moved around a fair amount and taken a little beating from time to time. But i can true it up pretty quickly and it says that way till the it gets abused.

View BenjaminNY's profile

BenjaminNY

130 posts in 1398 days


#8 posted 10-13-2015 01:26 AM

You are reviewing a 20 year old saw? I don’t think this model existed in 1995.

I sense the power of beer in this review. Really bad beer…

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1353 posts in 1210 days


#9 posted 10-13-2015 05:45 PM

I sense the power of beer in this review. Really bad beer…

- BenjaminNY

LOL

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Dedvw's profile

Dedvw

174 posts in 2876 days


#10 posted 10-13-2015 10:20 PM



Dewalt didn t used to make junk, but now that it was bought by black and decker and some of the tools are made elsewhere it is not so clear.

Black and Decker acquired DeWalt in 1960. DeWalt ceased too manufacturing in the USA in 2002.

- TheDane

They are back making some stuff in the US.

http://americanpride.dewalt.com/

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TheDane

5423 posts in 3658 days


#11 posted 10-13-2015 10:25 PM

They are back making some stuff in the US.

http://americanpride.dewalt.com/

I missed that. Wish more companies would bring their manufacturing back to the U.S.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

3502 posts in 1273 days


#12 posted 10-13-2015 11:05 PM


Dewalt didn t used to make junk, but now that it was bought by black and decker and some of the tools are made elsewhere it is not so clear.

Black and Decker acquired DeWalt in 1960. DeWalt ceased too manufacturing in the USA in 2002.

- TheDane

They are back making some stuff in the US.

http://americanpride.dewalt.com/

- Dedvw


Good to know.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan .. Soon Holland, Michigan)

View CyberDyneSystems's profile

CyberDyneSystems

260 posts in 2184 days


#13 posted 10-16-2015 04:07 PM

Dewalt didn t used to make junk, but now that it was bought by black and decker and some of the tools are made elsewhere it is not so clear.

To take it even further, not only was DeWalt bought by B&D in the 1960’s at the time DeWalt made one tool only, Radial Arm Saws.

Every yellow tool you have ever seen from any time period bearing the DeWALT name has absolutely nothing to do with the former manufacturer and inventor of Radial Arm Saws, DeWalt.

Those yellow tools were the 1980’s era B&D Pro and Industrial lines re-badged in Yellow and Black with the very imposing DeWALT logo to compete with the “Blue” Makita marketing that was winning everyone over. During the 1980’s anyone starting out buying power tools was buying blue Makata. B&D was seen as low end home owner stuff, even the massively over built Industrial line. The copycat marketing ploy worked perfectly and B&D through the DeWalt badge sold more power tools than ever. Previously the Pro and Industrial lines had essentially been a well kept secret of superior tools that only a small percentage of pros were aware of.

-- Without the wood, it's just working

View PatrickB's profile

PatrickB

53 posts in 2943 days


#14 posted 10-16-2015 05:54 PM



You are reviewing a 20 year old saw? I don t think this model existed in 1995.

I sense the power of beer in this review. Really bad beer…

- BenjaminNY

BenjaminNY, Glad I have a sense of humor, just about every person here has a good sense of humor. I wish it was the case, bad beer, heck I would settle for good beer. I would even settle for having my 1995 brain cells back LOL. I am recovering.. God Almighty, I dislike that term…. I’m a former drunk who no longer drinks?? I used to but I don’t? Yeck that could be construed way to many ways.LOL. No you are right, my memory has a few (few? LMAO, think it’s more than a few!) holes in it. But I do know how to square up a miter saw darn it! Both compounds too. I did set it up for a straight cut, vertical and horizontal, even removed the blade guard to ensure plenty of clearance for my square (darn good one too, a hardened steel 6” Starrett) and was careful to stay between the teeth of the blade. Checked on both sides of the arbor too. I know that the tilt can be set independently from straight and 45 degrees ob both tilts by loosening the two stop screws and the two screws that hold the angle indicator. That was where one of the bolt holes was stripped, over aggressive assembler at DeWalt. When I rotated the saw from zero to a 45 degree left hand cut I got a 46 degree cut. There is not an independent adjustment for swinging left and right, all you can do is zero out, but either I did do something wrong or the scale was not made properly. Also when I tried a straight cut the cut “wanders” by a 1/8” from front to back. That was when I tossed in the towel and did the review.

dhazelton, Any company can make junk, it’s not hard. A die that’s a bit worn but they want to stretch a few more dollars out of it. A guy or gal with a Monday morning hang over who does not particularly care at that moment what they are doing and are suffering from self pity.

The reason for changing from DeWalt to Milwaukee? At the time DeWalt was still making post style insert batteries and Milwaukee was making the slide on batteries. Ever try to get one of those stupid post batteries out of screw shooter when it doesn’t want to come out no matter how hard you “squeeze” where you are supposed to? Get so disgusted trying to change a battery you just have to walk away from it or it’s going flying? Plus we have them at work and I have seen the abuse these things can take. I was impressed. Doesn’t mean I am getting rid of my DeWalt biscuit jointer, it works great, so does my circular saw and my corded sawz-all is still running like a champ. Now the Jig Saw? I am almost ready to toss that against the wall. That is one of the worst jig saws I have ever used, I just can’t seem to get a handle on it.

As far as buying old? Old does not equal super good. But I just bought a 1960 Craftsman 100 for $75.00 that needs a little love and I’ll see how that goes. So far not so great as I broke the tilt screw trying to get the handle off. I took out the set screw and used Kroil (the oil that creeps) and it spun freely on the shaft. But it would not come off. I heated it 4 times (after cooling down in between attempts) and tried to get it off and it just would not budge! I mean it was aluminum, hit with the torch and give it a tug before the shaft sucks up the heat. No sir, would move. Well it did eventually but it’s no good to me now. I got the raise/lower handle off but it was almost as bad. That one I was patient enough that it cam off. And I now know why the other one was stuck, prior to assembly, Craftsman cut two grooves in the metal and one flat (for the set screw) and all I can figure is that with the grooves in there something happened. Well, I’ll get replacement parts. Do I wish I had a $2,000.00 cabinet saw? You bet but I don’t have the money and this one was the right price. $75.00, who can beat that? Probably spend another $100.00 or two to get it right but that’s ok. Sorry, babbling…..
Pat

-- Really? Really? How important is it?

View PatrickB's profile

PatrickB

53 posts in 2943 days


#15 posted 10-16-2015 06:08 PM

You couldn t dial in a twenty year old tool and give it a bad review. Have you determined if it s the castings or stops or your technique? Dewalt doesn t make junk.

- dhazelton

Dewalt didn t used to make junk, but now that it was bought by black and decker and some of the tools are made elsewhere it is not so clear.

However you are correct. Its a little odd to give a review of a 20 year old tool that has had all sorts of unknown abuse a bad review without investigating what has happened to it.

- Combo Prof

Give it a bad review? I said what I experienced. All sorts of unknown abuse? It sat in basement without enough use maybe, but no abuse. Was never dropped, kicked aside or pitched into the back of a pick up and bounced around in the back on it’s way to a job. Never cut anything not on the recommended list in the DeWalt instructions. It lost a star for striped bolt hole. I have no complaints on the motor, bushing are tight for the slides, motor brake works great but if I can’t get it to zero out and still make a 45 degree cut what use is it? I can set it up for 45 degree cut or I can set it up to cut straight. I suppose I can set it to cut straight and then use the left/right tilt for all of my compound cuts since that fence can be set up apart from the zero setting, oh but that bolt is stripped, guess setting to the left is out, huh? Ok I can make right hand tilt miter for 45 degrees and straight cuts and just ignore the rest. Your right, I’ll think about giving it 5 stars.
PatrickB

-- Really? Really? How important is it?

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