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A leg up on the work bench

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Review by Chris Wright posted 01-27-2009 12:32 AM 5894 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
A leg up on the work bench No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I had first read about this bench in the September ‘07 issue of American Woodworker. Earlier this month I met the inventor and got to try out the system. The system allows you to have a work surface at a height that you need.

I ordered the leg set, the caster set and their “one rail” system.

Here’s what they all looked like when the packages arrived.

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Here’s the legs. They are made from 11 gauge powder coated steal.

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Here’s the whole base assembled. The One Rail system eliminates one of the support rails without compromising support. Unless you purchase a full kit, you have to provide the wood rail (or rails) and the threaded rod.

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You also have to provide the top. Here I used an old piece of bowling lane wood. With the thickness of my top the bench can go from 28 1/2” all the way up to 45” high.

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I’ve only had it assembled for a few days now, having it on casters makes moving it around the shop very easy. The casters can be adjusted up to about 3 inches so it can be leveled and lowered so that the top can rest on the steal legs directly, if the work you’re doing is to much for the wheel locks.

This is a great bench. The only down side I’ve found is that if the legs are close together, then the sliders can bind up if you try to raise or lower one side to far in one movement. Other then that, it is a great bench system, and I’d recommend this system for anyone looking to make a new bench or assembly table.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken




View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

534 posts in 2167 days



10 comments so far

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2450 days


#1 posted 01-27-2009 04:01 AM

Well it certainly looks nice, but I just priced out what you bought and it came out to $770 without a top. OUCH !

View pitchnsplinters's profile

pitchnsplinters

262 posts in 2123 days


#2 posted 01-27-2009 04:51 AM

Nice bench. I saw the same article and have been intrigued since. Do you have a lot of flexibility on the spacing of the legs? Any recommendation on a good separation?

-- Just 'cause a cat has kittens in the oven, it don't make 'em biscuits.

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 2254 days


#3 posted 01-27-2009 08:28 AM

Woodchuck, Ouch indeed. For what you get it seems significantly overpriced.

-- Derek, Bremerton WA --

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

534 posts in 2167 days


#4 posted 01-27-2009 04:10 PM

Well, I admit, it is expensive. However when has anything that is made 100% in America been cheap. This isn’t something that is farmed out to a sweat shop in China or Taiwan. It’s made with the highest quality materials.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2450 days


#5 posted 01-27-2009 04:36 PM

I don’t expect it to be cheap, I expect it to be reasonable.

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 2254 days


#6 posted 01-27-2009 07:37 PM

Chris, again I’m in agreement with Woodchuck.. Even made in America, even made of the highest quality materials… The price still seems steep for what you get.

Don’t mistake me though, if you’re happy with it that’s the important part.

-- Derek, Bremerton WA --

View acanthuscarver's profile

acanthuscarver

261 posts in 2398 days


#7 posted 01-27-2009 08:12 PM

Chris,

I missed seeing you at the Baltimore show. I used one of the Noden benches for the first time at the show in Novi, Michigan last November (I borrowed a bench for my seminars and demos rather than ship my bench from PA). I’m a fairly skeptical guy when it comes to newfangled ways of woodworking. I’ve got to say, I was extremely impressed. So much so, that I now own an Adjust-a-bench too.

For over twenty years I tried to figure out ways to raise my workbench in the shop for when I’m carving. Nothing I came up with was both sturdy and easily adjustable. The Noden system is both. I can rapidly adjust the height for delicate carving or router work then drop it down and hand plane a pile of lumber without sacrificing stability. I think it’s well worth the price. My next purchase will be an additional set of legs so I can make my downdraft table adjustable. It’s a great, heavy duty system that should hold up for many years.

-- Chuck Bender, Senior Editor Popular Woodworking Magazine, period furniture maker, woodworking instructor

View motthunter's profile

motthunter

2141 posts in 2485 days


#8 posted 01-27-2009 09:51 PM

i need to look into this set up.

-- making sawdust....

View Doug S.'s profile

Doug S.

295 posts in 2394 days


#9 posted 01-30-2009 04:31 AM

Yup. Put the same setup under mine and haven’t regretted it yet
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7307

-- Use the fence Luke

View williams's profile

williams

53 posts in 1702 days


#10 posted 02-22-2010 08:02 PM

Nice. As another option, the Jack Bench is interesting http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5GIelbvLV4
$29 plans may be a good winter project for someone. Was thinking about using some other jack then a manual scissor jack. Maybe an electric screw jack (trailer hitch) or bottle jack.

-- William, Brighton, MI

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