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Excellent sander that has only two minor quirks

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Review by ferstler posted 2076 days ago 3567 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Excellent sander that has only two minor quirks Excellent sander that has only two minor quirks Excellent sander that has only two minor quirks Click the pictures to enlarge them

This R2610 device has been superseded by Ridgid’s R2611 version, which has subtle improvements involving dust collecting and speed selection. The R2610 version being reviewed may still be available used from some sources, and some Home Depot stores may even have new models still on hand, hopefully at a discount compared to the replacement version.

This unit is, as the title says, a six incher, which gives it a bit more coverage than typical five-inch models. It offers two orbiting ranges: ¼ inch and 1/8 inch, with the latter being more for fine work and the former being for serious wood removal. The motor has variable speeds, running from 4,000 to 10,000 oscillation/revs per minute. The motor draws 3.8 amps, and the unit weighs in at 6 pounds. The front handle can be adjusted to two different locations to suit the user, and the on/off trigger can be locked in the on position for longer work sessions. The lock is quickly disengaged by pulling the trigger a second time. The discs are attached to the rotating pad by means of a Velcro-style hook and loop surface. The speed changes are made via a dial, but the orbit diameters require a bit of specialized work that is decently explained in the manual. Supposedly, the replacement model has simplified this procedure. However, once the unit is set up to go the two should be pretty close in terms of performance.

The R2610 comes with an adaptor that lets you hook it to a 1.25- or 2.25-inch vacuum hookup, and it also has a rather goofy dust-collector bag that has thankfully been replaced with a more conventional bag with the newer version. However, for serious use one should forget about any bag and just hook the thing to a good dust-collecting system.

The three photos show the tool as well as two shots of my own dust-collecting rig. The collector is a GMC job and all it has to do is blow dust out into my “natural” back yard. The small hose was cannibalized from a discarded vacuum cleaner. The home-made junction attached to the bench can swivel as required. The only downside to this arrangement is that the GMC dust collector cannot really pull a lot of air through that small hose and the bleeder holes in the sander, so every once in a while you need to disconnect the main hose from the adaptor and let the collector blow the buildup in the bigger hose out into the yard. A more powerful collector might not have this problem, but I have the GMC and will stick with it until it quits.

I like this sander and have used it to smooth the surfaces of eleven solid-wood, six-panel doors I installed last year ( used a palm sander to get into the corners of the panels) and also to refinish our dining room table (I have pictures of the table on this site) and two tables at my sister in laws house. It handled all those tasks well.

Howard Ferstler




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ferstler

333 posts in 2146 days



10 comments so far

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Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2389 days


#1 posted 2075 days ago

I doubt that a more powerful dust collector is the solution. Infact, I think even the DC your useing now is suffocating. Really all you would really need is a good shop vac, like the one thats below your table, for a sander.

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ferstler

333 posts in 2146 days


#2 posted 2075 days ago

Good points have been made about the shop vac use and the improved suction, and I can certainly understand those points.

However, if you use a shop vac the filter in the thing will clog up pretty fast and the downside is that you can only clean the filter so many times until it needs to be replaced. So, yes, a shop vac does better (at least until the filter gets really loaded), but be prepared to change out the filters more often. Also, that DC that I have can run day and night with its induction motor and has no problem with tool-flow air resistance causing any kind of overload, whereas a shop vac’s motor is going to have some heating problems if you run it on and on and on while you sand away for a long time.

One point, I have two shop vacs (both are Ridgid models and as noted in the first comment by Woodchuck 1957, sit under that bench on wheels in the photos) and I keep the filter reasonably clean by shrouding it in regular, but somewhat cut down, vacuum cleaner bags that get discarded at intervals. (A big rubber band holds the bag in place.) Still, using the dust collector has never caused a problem with dust build up at the sander, so I will stick with it. No filters to deal with at all, and no worry about a vac motor overheating or destroying its brushes.

Actually, one shop vac is the “push” unit and is used to blow dust off of the deck and out of tools that have been used out there prior to them going back into storage in the shop, and the other is the “pull” unit and does vacuuming work in the shop. When the filter in the pull unit gets dirty I discard it and transfer the filter from the push unit. The push unit then gets a new filter.

Howard Ferstler

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Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2389 days


#3 posted 2075 days ago

Or work up wind from the sander. if it isn’t windy, use a box fan or discarded furnace fan to blow the dust away from you.

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ferstler

333 posts in 2146 days


#4 posted 2075 days ago

The Ridgid owner’s manual for the two vacs mentions that when doing work with really wet items you need to remove the filter. (There is a float valve to protect the motor if the water level gets too high.) However, when doing basic dry vacuum work they indicate that without the filter there is the potential to damage the motor.

I like that box fan idea.

Howard Ferstler

View spaids's profile

spaids

699 posts in 2319 days


#5 posted 2073 days ago

This is what I use with my shop vac. EVERYTHING gets trapped in a bucket and my shop vac and filter stay clean. No matter how fine the dust is. The website has a video of its shop vac attachment in action. Its awesome.

-- Wipe the blood stains from your blade before coming in.--

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Treverk

23 posts in 2106 days


#6 posted 2048 days ago

I also have this sander, but I get the worst swirl marks when I use it. For that reason I haven’t picked it up in over a year. Have you had any problems with swirls?

-- Matt

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sIKE

1271 posts in 2379 days


#7 posted 2048 days ago

Put a Wye on the in take and put your sander on one side and a blast gate on the other, now open the blast gate enough to solve your issue. You might have to put a small C-Clamp on it to keep at right amount of openness….

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

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ferstler

333 posts in 2146 days


#8 posted 2047 days ago

I’ve had no problems with swirls, but I also try to use finer grained paper when doing the really smooth finishing work. I also always hand sand with the grain after using the ROS to do the basic stuff.

Howard Ferstler

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optimusprime

35 posts in 1389 days


#9 posted 1352 days ago

just purchased the newer version and used it for a small flooring job (13’x13’) and have to say i was thoroughly impressed with the ROS. no swirls using 60 or 80 grit paper and finishing with 150 and 220 was a dream. i’m preparing to finish a couple of doors today using it.

-- Just hammering through life!!!

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ferstler

333 posts in 2146 days


#10 posted 724 days ago

I continue to use mine and have sanded the daylights out of many, many pieces of wood: bookcases and speaker systems, mainly. The sander works as good as new. I work outdoors on a deck adjacent to my shopl, and have discovered that you do not need to have a dust collector hooked up to it at all. Since I have a natural wooded lot I just let the dust spray out into the area (the sander has an excellent fan/scavenge system), and then use my blower to clean off the deck and roll-around work bench after the projects are done. I am upgrading my rating to five stars.

Howard Ferstler

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