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after 7 years of use my festool ts75 is still a work horse money maker.

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Review by vonhagen posted 03-18-2015 03:23 AM 5972 views 0 times favorited 32 comments Add to Favorites Watch
after 7 years of use my festool ts75 is still a work horse money maker. No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

when i first used my new festool saw i didn’t really realize it’s full potential but after 7 years of heavy use i have made very difficult cuts that would require jigs and or special table saw setups and router setups a thing of the past.i have made very long compound angle cuts upside down,vertical and horizontal,stack cut whole bundles of exotic veneers and stitch them up with no blow out and with perfect seams. the plunge feature and its stop give you the ability to cut out slab doors for glass and will work well on metal doors as well with the variable speed and metal blade. straight lining lumber is very easy and fast as well as sheet stock. one of the best things i like about this saw is i can lay out lines for cabinet work that have many angles and just lay the track down putting the rubber strip right on my marks and cut away without having to clamp the track. i have found that the rubber strip will wear out after a lot of use and changing to different blades and the rubber strips are expensive but i just peel it off the track and use some spray 90 on the bottom edge and reposition the strip further out and re cut it, this can be done about 3 times before a new strip is needed. the bottom line is this saw has saved me so much time and is very accurate and i could not work without this money making tool. what are your thoughts ?

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.




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vonhagen

539 posts in 2506 days



32 comments so far

View devann's profile

devann

2246 posts in 2834 days


#1 posted 03-18-2015 04:11 AM

It sounds like money well spent Blaine. When we invest in tools we invest in ourselves. I had been thinking about purchasing one of these but my job description has taken a slight turn in the last couple years. Maybe I’ll find a job to justify getting one. Thanks for the review, it’s always refreshing to get a review after the tool as had extensive use.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View vonhagen's profile

vonhagen

539 posts in 2506 days


#2 posted 03-18-2015 04:22 AM

thanks devann, it is still in like new condition and never a problem, the systainer keeps it safe as it bounces around in the back of my truck.

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View michelletwo's profile

michelletwo

2756 posts in 3157 days


#3 posted 03-18-2015 11:54 AM

I luv my 55. very versatile tools

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8406 posts in 2719 days


#4 posted 03-18-2015 04:36 PM

You purchased value and are now enjoying the benefits.

Excellent review vonhagen.

View Pat3's profile

Pat3

106 posts in 2021 days


#5 posted 03-18-2015 04:52 PM

I have a TS 55 and love it. Thanks for the tip about using spray 90.

View ScottKaye's profile

ScottKaye

682 posts in 2095 days


#6 posted 03-18-2015 09:45 PM

I still cant personally justify the HUGE Mark up on these tools that Festool gets away with. Yes they are better than most. but really, it doesn’t cost them any where near the $1300 they are charging for a domino system. They know their tools are superior, and they know they can get away charging an exorbitant price for them. Id love to own a piece of that company. Here’s a for instance , on April 1st almost every tool is going up 5-10% in price and they do this almost EVERY year. Talk about a windfall.

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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vonhagen

539 posts in 2506 days


#7 posted 03-18-2015 10:20 PM

well scott i have used almost all the festool products except their sanders and you can even get better and more expensive power tools from the parent company of festool called mafell and they are really spendy and very nice tools and like festool they are built to last a lifetime. what you are paying for is precision, build quality and longevity . so you can buy a dewalt, makita, porter cable power tool every couple of years after they die or buy a high quality tool and be done. the very best woodworking machines in the world are made in germany and they are very expensive but the precision and longevity of these tools simply pays for itself by saving you time and your end product will be dimensionally correct time and time again and your customers will come back time and time again along with new referrals.

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View Woodendeavor's profile

Woodendeavor

276 posts in 2748 days


#8 posted 03-18-2015 11:47 PM

There is only one thing bad I can say about the TS75. Not all of the blades are the same width so if you put in their nice ripping blade it cuts back the plastic strip so it will not line up with your other blades. Other than that I have been using mine hard for 4 years cutting a lot of 2” thick oak and walnut. one thing not mentioned in the initial review is how well the dust collection works. I have taken this saw into a customer’s home to cut down doors after they had new carpet installed. There was so little dust left they told me I did not need to clean up at all

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vonhagen

539 posts in 2506 days


#9 posted 03-18-2015 11:53 PM

oh yea woodendeavor the dust collection is excellent.

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View chem's profile

chem

32 posts in 1747 days


#10 posted 03-19-2015 01:50 AM

I used my 55 to cut a 1 cm from the bottom of a 1950s veneered door with lovely color form age. No splintering at all. In my mind this paid for it in one use (the math may work out a bit differently).

-- chemist by day, woodworker time permitting

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vonhagen

539 posts in 2506 days


#11 posted 03-19-2015 02:29 AM

exactly chem when i am out in the field installing i can do modifications on finished panels that are sometimes double sided that would usually require a trip back to the shop and put on the sliding table saw with scoring blade and palin attachment for tapers but both the ts 75 and ts 55 will not blow out because the bottom cut the teeth are going up and on the top the rubber strip and green hold down are pressing down on the material as the teeth are coming up just like using a back up block when crosscutting as when the teeth are going thru the rear of the cut. also a negative rake tooth atb is my blade of choice on veneers when crosscutting. i have found that the amana and forrest blades that are designed for the festool and mafell saws are imo better than the festool blades. one thing to keep in mind is the kerf and plate dimension as the kerf must be larger than the riving knife and the plate smaller than the riving knife. custom riving knives can be made by any machine shop and surface ground out of tool steel to any thickness.

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View vonhagen's profile

vonhagen

539 posts in 2506 days


#12 posted 03-19-2015 03:29 AM

in the first image my son burned thru the veneer in the top left corner and i set the saw depth just a few mm deep and cut the bad perimeter out then with my festool router i used a amana 1.5 inch morticing bit set at the thickness of the veneer and with offset foot set at the same depth i routed out the veneer and in the corners a little chisel work. then went back to the bundle of veneer and found the bookmatch and stitched it up then made a paper pattern and used it to cut out the new veneer. the second and third pics i used the ts 55 and stack cut all 48 pie pieces all at once then stitched them up and hot pressed them onto mdf for the ebony starburst.

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View Dj1225's profile

Dj1225

70 posts in 2362 days


#13 posted 03-19-2015 06:24 PM

You know it is funny. I have friends that go out every year and buy some golf club or set for 300 to 500 bucks or more, and they will give me a hard time about spending 500 bucks or so on a Festool saw or whatever. I don’t see their games improving but my work does seem to be. And I have never felt the urge to throw my tools in a lake :)

I own tools that are light years ahead of my ability now, but my goal is to catch up.

-- Dave

View vonhagen's profile

vonhagen

539 posts in 2506 days


#14 posted 03-19-2015 07:14 PM

lol dave that is so true and women are the the worst, they complain about men buying tools that are expensive and then go buy expensive clothes or shoes and tell you they were on sale and give you a cheap price but not realizing how pissed off they would be if you were to divorce them and you go to court and the judge says, mr. vonhagen since you own the house and everything in it and you kicked mrs. vonhagen to the curb because she was a lying cheating whore and you barbecued all her clothes and shoes i order you to pay her for what they cost. and my reply would be, well your honor i wrote down what she told me what each item cost and she didn’t pay all that much so that sounds good to me.

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View lj61673's profile

lj61673

261 posts in 2541 days


#15 posted 03-19-2015 07:59 PM

Just a few comments on your post. I’m not a Festool defender, but if you are going to debate their products, some fairness and accuracy needs to be applied…

”I still cant personally justify the HUGE Mark up on these tools that Festool gets away with.

Festool is clearly not for everyone. However you have no personal knowledge of their cost per unit, therefore you have no knowledge of their markup.

Yes they are better than most. but really, it doesn’t cost them any where near the $1300 they are charging for a domino system.

I’m not sure where you live but the Domino tool is $850.00 US, not $1300. Even including the Systainer with hundreds of Dominoes it still is about $1050.00 US

They know their tools are superior, and they know they can get away charging an exorbitant price for them.

Their customers also know the tools are superior, hence the enormous popularity and sales figures.The market sets the price. Too high and sales drop. Sales drop far enough and either the price comes down or Festool goes away. Simple.

Here’s a for instance , on April 1st almost every tool is going up 5-10% in price and they do this almost EVERY year. Talk about a windfall.”

Not sure where the news is here. Prices of goods and services don’t go up every year where you live?

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