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General Maxi-Lathe 25-100

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Review by Chris Wright posted 2117 days ago 8066 views 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
General Maxi-Lathe 25-100 No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

General makes two mid size lathes, the 25-100 and the 25-200. They are almost identical except that the 25-100 has a 1/2 HP motor with 6 speed stacked pulley, compared to the 25-200 having a 3/4 HP variable speed motor and the headstock assemble is capable of rotating for outbound turning. I was lucky enough to have a 25-100 donated to the shop and I’ve enjoyed using it now for the past few months. It is capable of turning small bowls, pens and spindles. I did notice when turning a bowl that if I wasn’t careful I could slow the motor down if I pushed too hard into the piece. I’m use to the big Delta we have. The tool rest that comes with it is 6 inches long with a 5/8 inch post, so you need to use a longer one, you have to try and find an aftermarket tool rest that will fit or wait till General makes a longer one (which I’ve been told that they are). It has a standard 1” x 8 TPI head stock spindle with a #2 Morse taper and a #2 Morse taper in the tail stock as well. Weighing in at 106 lbs. it will dampen most vibrations, however if the piece is too far out of balance then I recommend either clamping it to a sturdy bench or purchasing the available stand for it. It also has a bolt on extension bed available that increases then bed length from 15” between centers to 45” between centers. Setting the speed for this lathe isn’t too difficult, just remove the belt cover, loosen the motor lock and lift the motor to release the tension on the belt and just set it on the pulley you want and then tighten everything back up. The main reason I didn’t give this lathe a 5 star rating is because of the limitations. The motors a little on the weak side for heavier turning, if you do go with the extension bed you’re still stuck with the small tool rest, the motor isn’t reversible and if you’re like me and use a face plate to turn with, I strongly recommend buying a new face plate. The face plate that comes with this lathe is round and does not have any flat sections on it so that a wrench will fit it to take it off. At around $480, this is a great lathe for beginners to intermediate wood turners.

SPECIFICATIONS…....................................... MODEL 25-100 M1

Spindle speeds (6).........................................480, 1270, 1960, 2730, 3327, 4023 RPM
Swing over bed…..........................................10” (254 mm)
Swing over base….........................................7 1/2” (190 mm)
Distance between centers…...........................15” (382 mm)
Spindle thread…............................................1” (26 mm)- 8 TPI
Hollow tailstock…...........................................3/8” DIAMETER
Morse taper…................................................MT #2 (Headstock & Tailstock)
Self ejecting travel…...................................... 2” (51 mm)
Tool rest…....................................................6” (152 mm)
Face plate…..................................................3” (76 mm)
Motor…........................................................1/2 HP, 110 V, 1720 RPM, 3.8 A
Weight…......................................................106 LBS (45 kg)

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken




View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

529 posts in 2118 days



3 comments so far

View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 2714 days


#1 posted 2117 days ago

Thanks for the review. Here in Canada we cannot easily get access (I can’t anyway) to many of the tools available in the US. However . . . General is available up here.

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki

View Splinters's profile

Splinters

189 posts in 2820 days


#2 posted 2116 days ago

Hi Chris… Thanks for the review…I only recently purchased the 25-200 and can’t wait to play with it. Have been so busy working on other orders in my shop and not had time to do more than build a bench for it and turn it on to make sure it ran. It came highly recommended by a woodturner at a Woodcraft store (and it was on sale) I happened to pass by on a recent trip to and from Seattle. It seems to be a very solid machine and I will post a review once I get the chance to use it.

-- Splinters - Living and Loving life in the Rockies - http://www.splinterswoodworks.com/ - http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5220040

View Jim's profile

Jim

225 posts in 2281 days


#3 posted 2115 days ago

I am new to turning and took a couple courses at Lee Valley Tools where this is the lathe they use for training. I purchased the General Maxi Lathe based on the instructors recommendation and have been extremely happy with it. I’ve been doing pens, small bowls (up to 10”) as well as spindles and parts for other woodworking projects. I am very pleased with the General Maxi Lathe.

-- Jim in Langley BC Canada --- www.sollows.ca

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