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A Good Value

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Review by Purrmaster posted 167 days ago 2004 views 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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This review is for the Diablo/Freud 10 inch, 40 tooth circular saw blade. Model number D1040X

I got this at Home Depot for around $30 or so. My Freud blades needed sharpening and I needed to put something on my tablesaw.

I was very pleasantly surprised by this blade. It rips almost as well as my Freud 30 tooth (thin kerf) ripping blade. It leaves a smooth finish when crosscutting. The blade stayed sharp as long as my Freud blades did. Which is unsurprising, considering it is actually manufactured by Freud. It appears to have the same “perma-shield” coating as a Freud blade.

Overall this an excellent blade for the money. I suspect my next table saw blade will be another one of these. The only disadvantage of this blade is that it has less carbide than Freud branded blades. Which means it probably can’t be resharpened. This isn’t a bug, Freud is open about this. But at $30 you can probably afford to just toss it when this blade wears out and not worry about re-sharpening.

I also stuck it on my miter saw for a while and it worked very well there.

If nothing else it may be worth keeping one of these in reserve in case you need a saw blade on short notice.




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Purrmaster

777 posts in 728 days



16 comments so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10740 posts in 1325 days


#1 posted 167 days ago

Those are all I use now. Try the 24 tooth rip blades. They rip smooth as glass but also crosscut much cleaner than I thought they would. I have had my Diablo blades resharpened and no problems.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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cutworm

1064 posts in 1428 days


#2 posted 167 days ago

Thanks for the post. Been looking at these to try when my CMT wears out.

-- Steve - "Never Give Up"

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Purrmaster

777 posts in 728 days


#3 posted 167 days ago

I’ve actually been surprised how well this blade crosscuts. I normally use a 60 tooth blade on my miter saw. I got a brand new one not long ago. It worked as expected. Then I stuck this blade on the miter saw just for the heck of it. This blade gives me a cleaner crosscut than the 60 tooth blade. And that’s after the 40 toother had dulled from tablesaw use.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1270 posts in 1004 days


#4 posted 166 days ago

I have this blade, along with the 24-tooth blade, and the 60-tooth blade. Love them all. I use my 24-tooth blade during the initial milling and for more carpentry-type tasks, it has about 3 years on it and still going strong.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1867 days


#5 posted 166 days ago

I have 2 of these, the 24T rip blade, and the 80T crosscut blade. All are excellent. Resharpening can be done, although not quite as far as with the regular Freud blades. Honestly resharpening one of these cost the same as a new blade, no real sense in doing that… Just grab a new one… Cut quality is excellent.

I also use the 12” 80T crosscut in my SCMS, and I have a variety of the general purpose blades in my circular saw. What can I say? Even in their cheaper line, Freud really knows how to make good blades!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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gfadvm

10740 posts in 1325 days


#6 posted 166 days ago

My sharpening guy charges 35 cents a tooth. So I get them resharpened (especially the 24 tooth rip blades).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

777 posts in 728 days


#7 posted 166 days ago

I’ve only had my blades sharpened once (Freud blades). I am, in fact using them now. They’re certainly sharper than before I sent them in for work. But not as sharp as they were when new. So I’m inclined to replace blades rather than have them sharpened.

View OldRick's profile

OldRick

72 posts in 328 days


#8 posted 166 days ago

I have a variety of Diablo blades as well. Started with a 10” for my table saw and now they”re in my circular saw, my table saw, and my compound miter saw. I find them to be a good bang for the buck. They track straight (I checked all mine with a dial indicator) and they last a long time. I’ve yet to wear one out. When it starts cutting a little slow I just soak it in Simple Green for a while and take a plastic dish brush to it. Cleans right up to almost as good as new. A good step up from stock blades.

View bowedcurly's profile

bowedcurly

479 posts in 364 days


#9 posted 165 days ago

I have 2 of the 10-24 Diablo rip blades and have resharpend them both, they work great almost as good as my Forrest 20T, but they are good blades and at 27.00 at HD you can’t beat them with a crow bar

-- Staining killed the wood<<<<<>>>>>Dyeing gave it life

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Purrmaster

777 posts in 728 days


#10 posted 165 days ago

A note from a magazine in terms of blade cleaning:

I have this publication called “Table Saw Secrets” from Woodsmith magazine. There is a section (page 21) where they discuss using Simple Green to clean blades. To quote:

“While the original Simple Green is a good option for cleaning most of your blades, the manufacturer warns it should not be used when cleaning carbide-tipped blades. The contents of the cleaner cause the carbide to leach from the metal.”

Instead they recommend “Extreme Simple Green.”

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1240 posts in 432 days


#11 posted 164 days ago

And Freud recommends kerosene.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

66 posts in 182 days


#12 posted 162 days ago

I have found that when a blade no longer cuts well, I just clean them. Put back on the saw and they cut like new again. I am using the spray cleaner and a tooth brush. Kerosene isn’t really available, wonder if diesel would clean a blade? Only kerosene I find is in a jug in a store at an exorbitant price, at stations they just sell you uncolored diesel.

-- Jim from Kansas

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Purrmaster

777 posts in 728 days


#13 posted 161 days ago

Kerosone? Really? Is that on their website?

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1240 posts in 432 days


#14 posted 161 days ago

When I wrote them about the defect on my blade the tech guy wrote back and said they didn’t recommend blade cleaning products bc they can weaken carbide. So I asked what they do recommend. Soaking in kerosene followed by stiff brush was the answer.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Purrmaster

777 posts in 728 days


#15 posted 161 days ago

Interesting. I just got some stuff called “Lestoil” for blade cleaning. It seems to work all right.

I have a suspicion that just about anything will work ok to clean blades. I suppose if you clean your blades many times over the course of many years with the wrong cleanser you might mess up the carbide.

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