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Solid DVD - review of table saw safety - Still watching the series

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Review by lightcs1776 posted 172 days ago 1729 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Solid DVD - review of table saw safety - Still watching the series Solid DVD - review of table saw safety - Still watching the series No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I received this DVD set courtesy of Passion for Wood and Lumberjocks. I have completed the first DVD and most of the second one. There are several in the set, for a total of nearly 10 hours of instructions on table saw safety and use. Hendrik provides clear instruction on setting up the table saw, showing how to adjust the blade, the riving knife, safely cross cutting, etc. It is great for a beginner like myself. Hendrik speaks clearly and plainly, so he is easy to understand. You can watch him demonstrate each step, from setup to cutting, during the video as he shows what to do and explains why it is important. He even demonstrates a kick back, using styrofoam.

I have another 5 or more hours of instruction to watch, and look forward to doing so as time allows. The video is excellent for first time table saw owners, although I think there is plenty in it for those who have been working with a TS for many years. As with just about anything in woodworking, it isn’t cheap, but it isn’t any more expensive than any other DVD set. I would highly recommend it for a woodworking club that has new members or as a gift to someone just starting out in the hobby.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **




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lightcs1776

3523 posts in 281 days



11 comments so far

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boxcarmarty

9128 posts in 987 days


#1 posted 172 days ago

Tip #1: Don’t watch DVD’s while operating your table saw…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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lightcs1776

3523 posts in 281 days


#2 posted 172 days ago

Don’t worry, Marty. I’m watching the DVDs while running on the treadmill. I’ve got an apft coming up (physical fitness test), so I have to make sure this worn body can run 2 miles.

The only unusual thing in the series is his opinion on right handed folks needing right tilt saws. He gives a good reason, but it seems one of those things that can be debated till the cows come home.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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DIYaholic

13269 posts in 1302 days


#3 posted 172 days ago

Sounds like some good info on that DVD.
Looks like the right LumberJock won the giveaway!!!
Just try not forget what you learn!!!
I don’t know about your brain,
But mine is full….
And all new info crammed into it, forces old information out!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

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lightcs1776

3523 posts in 281 days


#4 posted 172 days ago

Thanks, Randy.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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Rick M.

3873 posts in 1007 days


#5 posted 172 days ago

Out of curiosity what is his reasoning on the right tilt/right hand thing? No intention of starting a debate, I’ve just never heard that argument before.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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lightcs1776

3523 posts in 281 days


#6 posted 171 days ago

Don’t worry about starting a debate. I’ll discuss things all day long, but I won’t argue unless there is something of significant importance.

I’ll have to go back to the video and review his reasoning. Life has been so busy lately. I’ll try and take a look at it tonight.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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Hendrik

7 posts in 2162 days


#7 posted 171 days ago

Hi everyone. I’m the guy on the front cover of the DVD so I thought I’d respond. I just saw this review, Chris. Thanks for posting it.

I’ll save you the trouble on the right tilt vs. left tilt debate by briefly explaining my preference for right tilt. And you’re all right that we can debate this until the cows come home, so I’ll just give you my thoughts and leave it at that.

Right handed people use table saws with the fence on the right. The right hand pushes the wood while the left hand holds the wood tightly to the fence and table. So for that reason alone, I’d prefer a right tilt table saw. Why? Because the right side of the blade then sits against the arbour flange. In other words, the arbour on a right tilt table saw is on the right side so the right side of the blade is always in the same place when you change blades, regardless of blade thickness.

On a left tilt table saw, the right side of the blade keeps changing position when you change to different blade thicknesses and this is a huge problem. It means that everytime you change blade thickness, your fence cursor goes out of alignment and needs to be recalibrated.

More importantly, the splitter or riving knife is extremely important to prevent kickback and it will only do its job well if you line up the right side of the splitter to the right side of the cut line or kerf. That way the right side of the splitter actually holds the stock tightly to the fence in behind the blade where your left hand is not allowed to travel. With a left tilt saw you can’t align the splitter or riving knife such that the right side is in line with the right side of the kerf of all blades unless all your blades have identical plate thickness and tooth set. With a right tilt saw I can set up the right side of the splitter in line with the right side of the kerf and that will barely vary from one blade thickness to another. Technically it does vary by differences in the set of the teeth from one blade to another, but that is a tiny difference compared to how the right side of the kerf can vastly change positions on a left tilt saw.

For left handers, I believe the fence should be on the left, the extension table on the left, and a left tilt saw is best because left handers should work exactly opposite, but in the mirror image, to right handers.

The argument that left tilt saws are safer for bevelled rip cuts does have merit, so I show in my video how I make bevelled rip cuts with my fence to the left of the blade and use shims with my splitter to align it in the right place for safety. However, how often does a person rip with the blade at an angle? Some people might do it fairly often, but most people probably a couple of times a year. However, with a left tilt saw you need to recalibrate your fence constantly and adjust the splitter position constantly if you keep changing blade thicknesses. That’s why for all my students with left tilt saws (which seems to be the norm these days) I just tell them to buy blades that all have identical plate thickness and tooth set and then these issues disappear. So I’m not saying a left tilt saw is dangerous if you know how to deal with it, but it requires more thought and planning and a lot of beginners just haven’t analyzed the ins and outs of the two options.

Anyhow, I have a busy day lined up in my workshop and have to get back to work, but I thought this explanation might save Chris from a whole lot of effort.

Stay safe on those table saws!

-- Fine furniture design/build, woodworking instruction and lots more -- www.passionforwood.com

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lightcs1776

3523 posts in 281 days


#8 posted 171 days ago

Hendrik, not only did you save me the time to look it up, but you explained the reasoning more clearly than I could ever have done myself. Thank you!

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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Rick M.

3873 posts in 1007 days


#9 posted 171 days ago

Thanks Hendrik. I’ve only ever used right tilt saws, learned on a Unisaw and have owned a Delta for ~15 years, and I have no complaints.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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Dave

11149 posts in 1467 days


#10 posted 170 days ago

Whats a table saw?

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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lightcs1776

3523 posts in 281 days


#11 posted 140 days ago

Just an update. I’m now on DVD 4 and have found the series to be a great asset. The safety information is invaluable for me, a newbie to real woodworking. I have learned more about ripping safely, using feather boards, crosscutting and the reason why he advises to do things a certain way. The current DVD is going over building a crosscut sled, which I thought I might do without, but now think is a smart addition to my little shop.

And Dave, a table saw is a hand saw with dead electrons. You have persuaded me to love hand planes, but I am not a fan of hand saws, so the table saw will stay.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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