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Review of the Woodcraft Anti Kickback Safety Rollers

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Review by steve_in_ohio posted 164 days ago 2851 views 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Review of the Woodcraft Anti Kickback Safety Rollers No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I bought these rollers a couple of days ago because my table saw is old and it doesn’t have a riving knife and I don’t like to use the blade guard. Also I had problems when running long boards thru the table saw that they would try to move away from the fence, so I bought these rollers. I mounted these on my fence with a t-track instead of the rail that it is sold for these. After some simple assembly I started using these and I love them. They hold the wood down to the table and tight up against the fence. You can cut about 2 inches minimum with these installed. I just have to make a new push stick because when cutting thin wood you can’t use a tall push stick because the rollers are in the way. The rollers are easily adjusted to different thicknesses of wood with a simple turn of the screw sticking out of the back. Simple and effective.

Overall this product is wonderful and now I feel safer using the table saw because I don’t have to worry as much about kickback.

-- steve, simple and effective woodworking---




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steve_in_ohio

1017 posts in 209 days



16 comments so far

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jap

1224 posts in 653 days


#1 posted 164 days ago

Thanks for the review, I’ve been thinking about getting them for my saw.

-- Joel

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mpounders

716 posts in 1494 days


#2 posted 164 days ago

I’ve had mine for over 20 years and I also think they are great. I feel a bit safer when I rip boards.

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

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steve_in_ohio

1017 posts in 209 days


#3 posted 164 days ago

jap, I would definitely get them, I just attached a 2×4 to my fence and put a t-track into it and used the bolts and wing nuts to attach it, I already had the t-track and bolts so I didn’t see spending the extra money to get the actual track that goes with these.

-- steve, simple and effective woodworking---

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lumberjoe

2829 posts in 847 days


#4 posted 164 days ago

These do not prevent kickback, they prevent pushback. There is a big difference. Push backs generally arent that bad. A kickback is when the piece makes contact with the back of the bade and is tossed backward. Only a riving knife is really going to help you there.

Also how the hell do you use a push stick with these? that picture looks like an incredibly dangerous cut/

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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steve_in_ohio

1017 posts in 209 days


#5 posted 164 days ago

lumberjoe, for a push stick you have to use one that is short in height and pushes the material at the front instead of the back, when I used these the first time I just used a piece of 2×2 to push the piece thru, there is actually more room under the arm of the roller than the picture shows, I have a good 3 inches under them while cutting a 1” board, so there can be room for a push stick. Also I don’t think anything will 100% prevent kickback but these keep the board against the fence and not let it go toward the blade and they don’t roll backwards, so if set up correctly they will reduce the chance of kickback. Like I said above, anything less than 2” is too thin to use these rollers, I agree that the picture is not the greatest in showing this

-- steve, simple and effective woodworking---

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Rick M.

3777 posts in 979 days


#6 posted 163 days ago

Bet these would take a little getting used to but I’d like to try them someday. Kickback is preventable, it just takes diligence.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 326 days


#7 posted 163 days ago

I could see using them for certain cuts.
I would take the back roller and move it in front of the front roller so that you could use a normal push stick to get the material past the blade.
Myself, I wouldn’t be using it as a kickback preventative but just to help hold material down and a little extra pull towards the fence.

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steve_in_ohio

1017 posts in 209 days


#8 posted 163 days ago

KevinJeffery, I agree, but with my old table saw, something is better than nothing.

-- steve, simple and effective woodworking---

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GOOD LUCK TO ALL

418 posts in 326 days


#9 posted 163 days ago

Don’t get me wrong Steve.
To each his own. If they work for you, however you use them, then right on. ;)
I was just saying how I would use them.

View lj61673's profile

lj61673

231 posts in 998 days


#10 posted 161 days ago

”These do not prevent kickback, they prevent pushback. There is a big difference. Push backs generally arent that bad. A kickback is when the piece makes contact with the back of the bade and is tossed backward. Only a riving knife is really going to help you there.
Also how the hell do you use a push stick with these? that picture looks like an incredibly dangerous cut”

Correct, so much misinformation out there. It comes from ignorance about knowing what causes kickback. Only a riving knife, which is a physical metal barrier between the rip fence and saw blade, can prevent the wood from contacting and climbing up the back of the saw blade as it passes.

These items will NOT stop kickback. A 3HP tablesaw will pick up that piece of wood and rip those rollers right off the fence and throw them all back at you. At a very high rate of speed.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

63 posts in 183 days


#11 posted 159 days ago

I am always astonished at the absolute-truth approach that riving knife disciples take. If only I could add one on my 13 yr old Unisaw … !

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1045 posts in 396 days


#12 posted 159 days ago

While a riving knife is a better solution than a splitter for a number of reasons, won’t a splitter also prevent kickback effectively?

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lj61673

231 posts in 998 days


#13 posted 159 days ago

The difference is s splitter is a thin piece of metal, narrower than the kerf of the saw blade. It is designed to keep the cut piece of wood from closing on the blade. It keeps it “split” open.
Because the splitter is narrower than the kerf it cannot prevent the wood from contacting the back of the blade as it passes. That is the cause of kickback.

Also a properly installed riving knife’s height is set just below the height of the blade allowing it to be used on non thru cuts.

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CharlesA

1045 posts in 396 days


#14 posted 159 days ago

As I said, I recognize that riving knives have advantages over splitters, but I’m surprised at your assertions that splitters have no effect on possibility of kickback, particularly since there are different kinds of splitters—-not all are a the piece of metal narrower than the saw kerf. Would I prefer to have a riving knife? Yes. Do I think my MJ Splitter Pro (two pieces that are not, in effect, narrower than the kerf) reduces possibility of kickback? Yes.

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Rick M.

3777 posts in 979 days


#15 posted 159 days ago

A riving knife is the same size until you change the blade.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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