LumberJocks

Shop Fox W1410 - get one while they last

  • Advertise with us
Review by Garry posted 11-09-2013 06:05 PM 3506 views 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Shop Fox W1410 - get one while they last No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I just (Nov. 9, 2013) got a Shop Fox W1410 fence for my Craftsman tablesaw at a great price. I took a chance even though it has been discontinued because it has great reviews from those who have one. ToolsandMore.us in Florida still has some (I don’t know how many). Call them to confirm. Previously priced at $250 plus, they are selling them now around $145 plus shipping. [Note – This is not the same company as toolsandmore.com.]

I mounted it yesterday and used it for several cuts today. It was easy to mount after I drilled and tapped holes in my table. As all the other reviews said, the drill and tap (3/8”-16) provided were useless. It will fit any tablesaw with a 27” deep table. I only needed to square up the fence a little which was pretty easily done.

It glides smoothly on rollers that straddle the horizontal edges of the angle iron rails. The rollers have a groove that runs on the edge of the rails. The front rollers are widely spaced to keep it square. The single back roller has substantial spring load to keep the front rollers tight to the rail so it stays square. At first it wasn’t real smooth but a little sanding on the rail edge fixed that.

When the lever is pushed down it clamps down rock solid. I couldn’t budge it with reasonable substantial force at either end. It seems well made and I would expect it to last a long time. The large front rollers are knurled so you can use either for fine positioning. A self-adhesive tape is provided for accurate positioning without measurements.

Unfortunately, the manufacturer is discontinuing it to focus on the Beisemeyer type fence (per sales rep at toolsandmore). Although it’s fortunate for me since I got a good buy on it.

-- Garry, North Carolina woodworker and engineer - The journey you're preparing for has already begun.




View Garry's profile

Garry

101 posts in 656 days



9 comments so far

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

1707 posts in 1133 days


#1 posted 11-09-2013 08:53 PM

Sounds good, not sure if i can jump on it but i will take a look would like to upgrade fence on my cman saw.

-- Justin - the tugboat woodworker - " nothing changed me like the first shnick from a well sharpened, decent hand plane"

View JayT's profile

JayT

3344 posts in 1152 days


#2 posted 11-10-2013 02:26 AM

I have the same fence on my C-man contractor saw. Love it most of the time. The only issue is that the motor hits the rear roller of the fence when doing bevel cuts, making it impossible to do some.

-- "My concern is not whether God is on our side; my greatest concern is to be on God's side, for God is always right." Abraham Lincoln

View Garry's profile

Garry

101 posts in 656 days


#3 posted 11-10-2013 02:54 PM

JayT – I see how that could be a problem with one of the older model table saws. You might be able to clamp an extension to the fence to serve in those situations.

My hybrid model has the motor within the cabinet so no restrictions on fence travel.

-- Garry, North Carolina woodworker and engineer - The journey you're preparing for has already begun.

View Steve Cherry's profile

Steve Cherry

123 posts in 772 days


#4 posted 02-16-2014 10:31 PM

Nice review Garry; I also have an older Craftsman TS and would like to replace the fence. Question – how do you attach an auxiliary fence like if you want to use a dado blade partially buried in a wooden auxiliary fence; the OE craftsman fence has a couple of holes in the side where you can slide in a couple of screws and tighten them down from the other side. Do you use the T track somehow? Thanks for the review

-- Steve - Seaford, DE

View Garry's profile

Garry

101 posts in 656 days


#5 posted 02-16-2014 10:44 PM

Take a look at the manual. You can find it pretty easily online. They provide direction on which parts of the fence you can drill and tap to attach a wooden fence face. You could also use a fence clamp to attach it.

-- Garry, North Carolina woodworker and engineer - The journey you're preparing for has already begun.

View Steve Cherry's profile

Steve Cherry

123 posts in 772 days


#6 posted 03-01-2014 06:33 PM

Garry; thanks for the info on the auxiliary fence; I got mine last week and am trying to mount it onto my Craftsman TS today. There are instructions in the manual for attaching an auxiliary fence. The mounting holes on the rear fence seem to line up bolts underneath the table; guess that’ll take some fiddling.

-- Steve - Seaford, DE

View Garry's profile

Garry

101 posts in 656 days


#7 posted 03-01-2014 06:45 PM

I drilled and tapped all new holes. It was easier than working with the Craftsman bolts and nuts. It was easy to tap the cast iron table. Pay attention to the vertical placements to make sure it aligns under the miter slots. After adding my router table on the right side, I had to cut part of the rear fence away for the router table miter slot.

-- Garry, North Carolina woodworker and engineer - The journey you're preparing for has already begun.

View Steve Cherry's profile

Steve Cherry

123 posts in 772 days


#8 posted 03-02-2014 12:10 AM

Got the holes tapped ok and the fence is mounted, just needs to be adjusted. My Craftsman TS has the metal extension wings on each side – I guess I’ll have to drill holes in the fence rails to bolt the extensions onto since they don’t have any extra holes for that purpose.

-- Steve - Seaford, DE

View jaysuzi's profile

jaysuzi

74 posts in 741 days


#9 posted 05-09-2015 02:03 PM

Thank Gary, I just saw this post on 4/28/2015 when I saw this fence on sale at Grizzly. This had been running close to $300 at Grizzly and $264 at Amazon. I think they are now in the final push to get rid of these. I got mine for $159 at Amazon with free shipping.

I can see why they are no longer making them and concentrating on their Beisemeyer type fence. It is not the typical design, does not lift right off the table (you need to slide it off and remove the stop first), and it needs a lot of clearance off of the back. I had to move my assembly/outfeed table away a bit from my saw.

However, this was a great fence for me. I have a Ridgid R4512 and was not happy with the fence, but didn’t want to spend $300 on a fence for a $550 saw. I was even starting to look at upgrading my saw. I was thinking, if I was going to spend the money, maybe I should move up to a cabinet saw. And if I was going to go to a cabinet saw, I should look at Sawstop and with accessories that would be $3000. So the way I look at it, you and this fence saved me $2860!!! It is also a vast improvement over my old fence. It is SQUARE, which was not always the case with my old fence. It slides easy, stays squares even when not locked down, making setups easy, can tap the side to get it just where you want it, and locks firmly on front and back.

The installation went very well. In fact, I think it took me longer to get the old one off than getting the new one on, even though I needed to drill and tap new holes. I was going to redo my table extensions, however, since the fence went on so quickly, I tacked on my old extensions – including my router table extension. I was then very pleased, so instead of doing new extensions, I spent last weekend remaking my box-cutting saddle and router fence. Needed to redo these because of the higher fence.

So far, I am very pleased with this fence and would highly recommend it to someone in a similar situation – with a $500 or so hybrid saw looking for an affordable upgrade – knowing that there are some pros and cons.

-- Jay in Pennsylvania

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com