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I don't usually care much for Chris Schwartz videos...

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Review by jusfine posted 06-16-2013 07:44 PM 2459 views 2 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
I don't usually care much for Chris Schwartz videos... No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

This DVD impressed me, where some of his others have not. I learned that I have been wasting time by failing to follow these methods, and I am eager to try them out to see what difference it will make.

The 65 minutes covers hand planing, mortise and tenons, rabbets and fillisters, joinery and curved work, all employing the Coarse, Medium and Fine methods.

From the DVD back cover:

”Most woodworking projects involve roughing, refining and finishing operations.

In this DVD, Chris exlores the right hand tool to use for each stage. He groups tools by which operations they perform.

By choosing the right tool for each step, woodworking can be very precise and fast, and the hand tool will often be the most effective choice.”

Additionally, the DVD contains the 2006 article Coarse, Medium & Fine from Popular Woodworking and the plans for the Enfield Shaker Cabinet featured, easily accessed on the computer.

I have collected a number of VHS tapes and DVDs over the years, and watch them in the mornings while I spend quality time with my treadmill or eliptical trainer. Since my job has changed to more of a management role, I find I feel better by starting my day learning a woodworking tip or watching a project build along with some exercise.

As I mention earlier, I have some of the previous Schwarz videos, and to be honest, they have not piqued my interest at all. I find better tips and tricks, enjoy watching the project builds, etc from Rob Cosman, the Woodwhisperer, Paul Sellers, Richard Raffin, etc, and I even bring back the New Yankee Workshop once in awhile, although I know most of the programs by heart (you can absorb an amazing amount of video in 45 minutes when it is viewed each day).

When making a purchase at a recent Lie Nielson event, I found I could pick a free DVD but had all the titles they made available for me to choose from except this one, so I reluctantly took Coarse, Medium & Fine.

I am glad I did as this video showed me the error of my ways…

I have worked with handplanes for years under the mistaken impression that what I was doing was correct (who knows where I got that info?), and now I am trying out a different time-saving path.

I don’t feel I should give away the methods and secrets of the DVD, but leave you to explore them on your own, but I would recommend this one so you can see which planes to use where, the correct curvature for your irons, setting chipbreakers correctly, as well as using scrapers and spokeshaves and more.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."




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jusfine

2280 posts in 1649 days



11 comments so far

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HillbillyShooter

4827 posts in 1015 days


#1 posted 06-16-2013 07:55 PM

Thanks, I’ll keep this in mind and an eye out.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View cagenuts's profile

cagenuts

35 posts in 943 days


#2 posted 06-17-2013 03:56 AM

He mentions this mindset in his “Hand Planes” book that I bought a couple of years ago. It certainly changed my thinking, especially how each different tool corresponds to the respective power tool.

Bottom line, if you have a powered Jointer you still need a Jointer plane. (Why Tommy Mac refers to it as a Joiner is beyond me).

He’s a good teacher though, one of the best as many woodworkers tend to struggle with articulating themselves. You can watch a David Charlesworth vid on fast forward and still follow :-)

Another great teacher is Paul Sellers as he encourages people to get into woodworking without having to spend a trillion on fancy tools.

If you can get past Schwarz’s Lie-Nielsen fetish then his DVDs are worthwhile.

Coarse, Medium and Fine is a great mindset/philosophy.

-- Weekend Wood Wrecker

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1771 days


#3 posted 06-17-2013 08:03 PM

“Another great teacher is Paul Sellers as he encourages people to get into woodworking without having to spend a trillion on fancy tools.”
Amen, Paul is my very favorite teacher

-- Bert

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

560 posts in 627 days


#4 posted 06-20-2013 02:11 PM

Cagenuts – T Mac refers to it as a Joiner because he is from BOSTON. When we say a word, we take the literal pronunciation and run it through the drum sander once or twice, pop a few holes into the vowels with a drill press, roundover any sharp edges that remain, and spit it out the sides of our mouths. Hope that helps :)

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15983 posts in 1590 days


#5 posted 06-20-2013 02:21 PM

It looks interesting and I will investigate it further. Thanks.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2371 days


#6 posted 06-20-2013 02:21 PM

Cagenuts – T Mac refers to it as a Joiner because he is from BOSTON. When we say a word, we take the literal pronunciation and run it through the drum sander once or twice, pop a few holes into the vowels with a drill press, roundover any sharp edges that remain, and spit it out the sides of our mouths. Hope that helps :)

and isn’t that exactly “Course->Medium->Fine” in a nutshell?

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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a1Jim

112529 posts in 2300 days


#7 posted 06-20-2013 02:55 PM

Thanks for your review.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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felkadelic

195 posts in 1263 days


#8 posted 06-20-2013 09:34 PM

I agree wholeheartedly with this review (although I am generally a fan of Schwarz’s work). I got this DVD as a freebie at a Lie-Nielsen event and watched it as soon as I got home. It’s a well-presented, well-organized DVD that really clarified the process of processing stock by hand.

View cagenuts's profile

cagenuts

35 posts in 943 days


#9 posted 06-21-2013 01:57 PM

Thanks for the clarification MrFid!

-- Weekend Wood Wrecker

View stefang's profile

stefang

13530 posts in 2057 days


#10 posted 07-05-2013 08:36 PM

Sounds like a great video. thanks for your review.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Kim's profile

Kim

7 posts in 453 days


#11 posted 09-02-2013 07:57 PM

I think it is an excellent DVD too, one that help a person sift through all the styles and length of bench planes and come up with a set that does all the jobs of going from coarse to medium to flat.
I also like his comment that the appropriate plane is somewhat dependent on the size of project you have; i.e. conference table of solid wood to a jewelry box. A #8 bench plane doesn’t fit on a 8” long box, so the “jack” plane for this small box might be a block plane, the jointer a #4 and a fine block plane the finisher.

-- Kim, Corvallis Oregon

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