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Accurate, Repeatable Spindle Tenons on the Lathe

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Review by DustyMark posted 640 days ago 3017 views 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Accurate, Repeatable Spindle Tenons on the Lathe No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Description
The Anthony Tools Tenon Tool Adapter is well-made product that enhances your ability to turn accurate and repeatable spindle tenons on the lathe. The manufacturer advertises .002” tolerances for final fit.

Use
It is designed to be attached to a 1/2” square nose scraper. The tool rides on the tool rest and also rubs against the bottom side of the tenon. The scraper cuts at the top of the tenon and produces a clean, smooth cut. The scraper quits cutting when the edge reaches the tangent of the spindle. This cutting method is meant to remove only the final 1/16” of material. Prep work for the cut includes 1) removing wood to within 1/16” of the final desired tenon diameter and 2) setting the tool to acheive the desired final diameter/fit.

Fitting
I turn a small scrap of wood in a chuck to acheive the correct diameter. This allows easy removal of the test piece to fit into a pre-drilled hole. Move the tenon tool back on the scraper to turn a smaller tenon. This trial and error fitting process is slow at first, but I imagine a person would get quicker with experience. I plan to keep one tool set for 1” and another set for 3/8” for my typical chair builds. A quality scraper should hold an edge for quite a while since not much wood is removed on each cut. One wouldn’t have to go through the fitting process very often if you had multiple tools.

Protective Coating
The manufacturer recommends applying wax to the tool surface to prevent the protective coating from rubbing off. I found that the coating rubs off of the tool too easily even with a coating of wax. Wax and glue aren’t a good mix, so I will likely hone the coating off of the rubbing surface and deal with any potential rust later.

Final Thoughts
If you want to produce precisely fitted tenons, this is a tool worth considering. Set-up can be slow, but the final product is worth the effort. The cut is smooth, precise, and repeatable. Follow this link to a video of my initial use of the tenon tool adapter. (There might be a short delay before the video starts.) Follow this link to the manufacturer’s web site.

-- Mark, Minnesota




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DustyMark

271 posts in 701 days



12 comments so far

View JohnnyB's profile

JohnnyB

84 posts in 1020 days


#1 posted 640 days ago

Very clever! Thanks for the review.

-- JohnnyB - - Sometimes determination can substitute for skill.

View michelletwo's profile

michelletwo

2232 posts in 1647 days


#2 posted 640 days ago

seems harder to do than just turning the tenon until an open end wrench slides over it..I’ve got enuf turning experience I can make a well sized tenon in a minute or so..this seems to take up way more time to set & use, since you have to turn it so closely then use the tool…maybe for a newbie….

-- We call the destruction of replaceable human made items vandalism, while the destruction of irreplaceable natural resources is called development.

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DustyMark

271 posts in 701 days


#3 posted 639 days ago

michelletwo:

I agree. For a master turner such as yourself, the wrench technique would certainly be quicker in small quantities. However, for a furniture-part turner such as myself, this will make life a whole lot easier when I’ve got 28 tenons to produce for the back spindles alone. A caliper and a roughing gouge make quick work of getting down to within 1/16” or so of the final fit. I’m interested in seeing how much it speeds things up when I proceed to the second of two rocking chairs that I’m building. Making fourteen spindles slide together simultaneously into the back crest and the seat blank requires a loose, but not too loose fit. I’m confident this inexpensive tool will allow me to acheive that precise fit 28 times in a row…

Mark

-- Mark, Minnesota

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michelletwo

2232 posts in 1647 days


#4 posted 639 days ago

Dusty..I got that experience by making hundreds of windsors & shaker rockers over the years. (many which were made on a homemade springpole lathe) . I do not doubt this will work, but if one can get within 1/16, why can’t one get to just perfect just as easily.?
I hope this works well for you. Each of us works differently & we learn over time what works for us. Have fun with your chair building, no matter the method you choose, as the joy of turning & woodworking is to enjoy the journey. (and to have cool tools!!)

-- We call the destruction of replaceable human made items vandalism, while the destruction of irreplaceable natural resources is called development.

View realcowtown_eric's profile

realcowtown_eric

295 posts in 568 days


#5 posted 219 days ago

This device seems to have disappeared off the market. Does anyone know of a transmogrified reaappearance of the mfgr? I often times have to match the tenons in overbored or worn out holes in chair repair, and to me, this looks like it would do the trick well, with the help of caliper.

Maybe shave a minute or two off each spindle end turning. maybe not, but who knows. I just want this task to go quicker and more accurate.

Eric in Calgary

-- Real_cowtown_eric

View sparky3x's profile

sparky3x

1 post in 834 days


#6 posted 193 days ago

Eric In Calgary
You can find this tool and it is still available at this URL http://midwestwoodart.com/tools He has apparently had some problems switching his web site to a different carrier He ask me to post this so that you would know the tools are still available To purchase any of these tools, email:ImLyndal@aol.com, or lyndal.anthony@gmail.com

-- John, South Central Ozarks

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realcowtown_eric

295 posts in 568 days


#7 posted 193 days ago

Thanks John!

Eric

-- Real_cowtown_eric

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realcowtown_eric

295 posts in 568 days


#8 posted 192 days ago

Dusty…I ain’t workin from new, rather repairing old chairs, and oftentime the female wood has shrunk…What was 9/16 hole is now 35/64, run a 9/16 forstner into the hole to clean out the old glue and you got a sloppy joint when you try to reassemble/.

Dowel replacement becomes the same….had to make my own dowel formers to get firm fitting dowels. Frig, even the high end tool suppliers who still make these things don’t make them in 64ths. 8ths if yer lucky and can afford them,

Needed appropriate size drill to fabricate. Got it. Made it- Works like a charm….anyone wanna see. really it is so plebian and simple, but what the heck, if you aint seen one in action you just might wanna see it.

It’s the turning tenons that had become a little bit of a bottle neck, but now I see a light at the end of the tunnel. maybe making it a tad faster to achieve some semblance of a competent repair,

in search of perfection.. maybe it’s just around the corner…

Eric in Calgary

-- Real_cowtown_eric

View DustyMark's profile

DustyMark

271 posts in 701 days


#9 posted 191 days ago

Eric,

I don’t find this tool real fast, since there is a lot of time spent messing with setting it to get that “perfect” fit. However, I still use it successfully to get a set of tenons that have the same fit. Definitely play with it on some scrap wood that is similar to your final product. I make reference pencil marks on the chisel and on the tenon tool adapter to keep track of my adjustments. Good luck…

-- Mark, Minnesota

View realcowtown_eric's profile

realcowtown_eric

295 posts in 568 days


#10 posted 191 days ago

Mark, thanks for the perspectives…

I’ve been cutting the tenons by hand, using the open end wrench size to get it a tad larger, then a few swipes with the rasp to fit by hand. which gives the tenons a bit of tooth for the (gorilla) glue to adhere to. sure but slow

It’s kinda funny, for years I’ve had an old beaver lathe sitting in the corner, generally doing nothing except collecting dust. Little or no requirement for lathe work in my work. Used to hate to dig it ou for the odd little job. still hate to dig it out

I used to think I had too many routers, now I think I have too many lathes…

Brother, I have no fear, as that feeling will eventually pass!

Eric

-- Real_cowtown_eric

View ImLyndal's profile

ImLyndal

1 post in 154 days


#11 posted 153 days ago

Dusty Mark. Thank you so much for your nice review. If I could use your review link on my web site, I will send you a free tenon tool.

Lyndal Anthony
anthonytools.com

-- Lyndal

View DustyMark's profile

DustyMark

271 posts in 701 days


#12 posted 153 days ago

Lyndal, you’re welcome. Go ahead and use the link. I’ve already got two of your sizing tools, so we’re good!

-- Mark, Minnesota

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