LumberJocks

Yes, you can buy an economical veneer hammer at the hardware store.

  • Advertise with us
Review by shipwright posted 745 days ago 2957 views 3 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Yes, you can buy an economical veneer hammer at the hardware store. Yes, you can buy an economical veneer hammer at the hardware store. Yes, you can buy an economical veneer hammer at the hardware store. Click the pictures to enlarge them

I’ve posted two home made veneer hammers in the past as projects. This one comes right off the shelf and it works better than either of my previous attempts. The only modification needed to transform it from the Clarke Kent of the paint scraper world to the Superman of the affordable, available veneer hammer world is that you need to spend a few moments at the bench grinder dulling it down and smoothing the edge.

The main requirements of a good veneer hammer:

1) It must allow you to put serious pressure on a small area. This tool is ergonomically designed to allow you to exert the serious pressure needed to scrape stubborn paint. It has a thin edge to get the force onto a small area and it comes in a variety of size for different veneering applications….... Check!

2) It must have angled edges at the ends of the blade to allow hammering in tight corners….. Check!

3) It should be easy to clean…...Check!

I’ve used this one on a few jobs now and find it a very good substitute for the much harder to find and expensive ones sold as veneer hammers

If you ever need a paint scraper, just loosen the screw and rotate the two sided blade!

I would like to have given it five stars, which it deserves as a pressing tool but real veneer hammers have some advantages in terms of holding heat and actually “hammering” veneer pins.

It comes in lots of sizes and shapes, all of which would work depending on the job at hand.

You can look at them all here.

Note: This company is unaware that they produce a veneer hammer.

IMHO, Paul

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/




View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4896 posts in 1422 days



18 comments so far

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1819 days


#1 posted 745 days ago

Shipwright;

What is a veneer hammer?

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View bunkie's profile

bunkie

411 posts in 1771 days


#2 posted 745 days ago

Shipwright,

Very cool. I especially like that it still works as a scraper.

Viking,

A veneer hammer is used to press veneer against the underlying substrate. Imagine a very dull blade set at 90 degrees to the handle. To use it, apply the glue to the veneer (it works best with hot hide glue), set the veneer in place and draw the blade of the veneer hammer on the surface of the veneer applying as much pressure are possible. You really don’t use to to “hammer” the veneer, just to apply pressure. The design allows a tremendous amount of pressure to be applied. It’s like using a J-roller, although one should never use that tool to apply veneer as it can damage the surface and it doesn’t apply nearly as much pressure.

-- Altruism is, ultimately, self-serving

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1493 posts in 2085 days


#3 posted 745 days ago

I’m of the opinion that there is really nothing new in the world just reapplications of the best of what works and a universal struggle to accomplish a required task. I’ve always been intrigued by how different cultures solve the same problem. At times I have felt guilty about using something that I already had and modifying it into a tool that would do what I needed as well or better and faster than if I had tried to make it. Not so much anymore. There are so many remarkably well designed tools available, that are relatively cheap compared to our time. None the less I always appreciate a fresh approach on things. I can see how this thing could work as well or better than “conventional” veneer hammers.

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1819 days


#4 posted 745 days ago

Thanks Bunkie!

I am a veneer sub-amateur!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4896 posts in 1422 days


#5 posted 745 days ago

Actually hammer veneering can be done only with hot animal glue as it is dependant on the seal created at the edges of the veneer by the quickly cooling glue. As the glue cools and gels, it seals the edges. No more air can get under the veneer. Therefore if you “hammer” the air out you have exactly the same effect as a 100% efficient vacuum bag…....................but way cheaper and easier.

Here’s an excellent video.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6906 posts in 1927 days


#6 posted 745 days ago

i always enjoy finding a tool in disguise…lol..there usually much cheaper, but as you say, they might not be designed to hold the heat as you mention, but some things can be worked with, thanks for the review here and showing a tool that can be used for this application…i love saturdays…finding a new tool makes them even better…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View bunkie's profile

bunkie

411 posts in 1771 days


#7 posted 745 days ago

Shipwright, I didn’t know that. I’ve yet to try using hot hide glue, but now I think I’d like to give it a try knowing that there’s a cheap, effective veneer hammer out there. Thanks for sharing this!

Can you melt hide glue in a double boiler? Or do you really need to have the hot pot? I seem to remember that we’re talking about a melting point somewhere between 140 and 200 degrees farenheit, is that right?

-- Altruism is, ultimately, self-serving

View Roger's profile

Roger

14311 posts in 1428 days


#8 posted 745 days ago

Very interesting, and thnx for the link/s

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4896 posts in 1422 days


#9 posted 745 days ago

bunkie, Yes you can get away with a water bath in a kettle with a thermostat.
The “Rival” available at Walmart in the USA (but not in Canada) is a classic. They are around $10.
200 degrees will kill your glue. 140 is optimum.

Keep an eye out. I’m preparing a “hide glue for beginners” blog.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6906 posts in 1927 days


#10 posted 745 days ago

oh goodie, i need that blog,i have two cans of hide glue and have used it one time, and need as much knowledge as i can get on it, i would rather get it from you Paul then say a book, practical experience is the best…ill watch for it…grizz

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View cathyb's profile

cathyb

757 posts in 1868 days


#11 posted 745 days ago

I agree with the Grizzman. Paul, it’s high time that you started that book. You know we would all want an autographed copy. With your skills, you could probably have it out by Christmas. Sign me up for a copy please….

-- cathyb, Hawaii, www.cathyswoodworking.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4896 posts in 1422 days


#12 posted 745 days ago

Thank you Cathy, but I’ll leave the book writing to the real experts.
I’m still a novice …. except maybe at building boats.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3962 posts in 2688 days


#13 posted 745 days ago

Glad you posted the Rival solution, what a great deal as opposed to using the 300 dollar model.
Do you have to heat the hammer blade at all?

BTW, I for one would be highly appreciative of that Hot Hide Glue 101 blog. Thank you so much for sharing your skills.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4896 posts in 1422 days


#14 posted 744 days ago

Douglas, No the blade doesn’t need to be heated.
The heavy metal hammers hold enough heat to re-soften and re-press little bits of marquetry that you want to adjust or repair.

The blog is here

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3962 posts in 2688 days


#15 posted 744 days ago

Thanks!
I have read another person’s bit about using the hot-pot for glue. On his iteration his glue jar is down in the pot so that humidity aids in keeping the glue from skinning over. But as I have veneered not one board with hide glue, and my hot-pot is still in it’s box, I will be the first to admit that I know not from which I speak…

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase