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Review and Testing of a G0440 Cyclone Dust Collector

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Review by djg posted 663 days ago 7490 views 0 times favorited 30 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Review and Testing of a G0440 Cyclone Dust Collector Review and Testing of a G0440 Cyclone Dust Collector Review and Testing of a G0440 Cyclone Dust Collector Click the pictures to enlarge them

I will start by saying that I am new to LumberJocks. This is my first post and my first tool review. Like many woodworkers, I have a well equipped shop. Also like many woodworkers, I left dust collection until last. This is an unfortunate. I now realize that dust collection should be one of the first things you should consider as soon as you purchase that first tool. As much as you would like to purchase more tools to do more things, a dust collector should be considered after purchasing that first tool. I will also say that a dust collector, no matter how efficient at collection dust, should not be considered the first plan of attack against sub micron dust. A good mask with appropriate filters should always be used.

After 10 years of woodworking my shop needed a change. As like many woodworkers, I did ALOT of research. I’m sure that I don’t need to mention who’s site to visit. However for those new woodworkers, Bill Pentz’s website is where you need to start your research. After reading his site I realized that dust collection is a daunting task. The main key is collection at the source of dust with as much air flow as possible. I am a capable guy, I have made many things in my years of woodworking including CNC machines and wooden gear clocks. I did not have the time to spend building my own cyclone from a plan, so I decided that a cyclone from one of many vendors would be my only option. I live in Torbay, Newfoundland (Canada). Shipping would be a problem and the cost for any of the vendors would be a fairly large chunk of the cost of a cyclone. After reading reviews, considering cost, and dynamics of my shop, I decided on the Grizzly G0440 2 HP Cyclone Dust Collector. I also added the muffler and the stand (H7499)

It was shipped from Pennsylvania by UPS freight to St. John’s, Newfoundland (Canada). It arrived after 2 weeks and the boxes were in pretty good condition. I will mention that I didn’t have to pay any duty and Grizzly paid the brokerage for importation into Canada. I opened the boxed and inspected the parts. There was absolutely no damage. This was probably my main concern about shipping such large crates over a long distance. I started assembly according to the manual. If you purchase the stand it helps to review both manuals before you start. I have read some review where people say that they had problems following the procedure. If you study the manuals before starting the build, there will be no problems. I was impressed by the finish on the machine. The powder coated finish is great and there were no issues with scratches and dents. I was impressed by the heavy rubber gaskets provided to seal the parts of the cyclone that could leak. Foam gaskets were provided for areas that needed to be sealed against flex hose. I was also impressed to see that the junctions of some preassembled parts had already been caulked at the factory. Overall the fit and finish of the machine was exceptional. All parts were accounted for but I did have one issue. I ordered the new model G0440 (post march 2012) which has a switch ganged along side a junction box. The mounting plate that came with my stand was for a pre march 2012 model. I have called Grizzly and I can say that their customer service has been great. The part will be replaced under warranty. International ordering was also a breeze. When I mounted my cyclone on the stand I decided to put the cyclone at the upper position just to get it closer to the ceiling where the duct would come in from the collection system. The 9” flex hose provided wasn’t long enough to attach the cyclone to the lid of the collection barrel. I didn’t have the extension for the collection barrel so I had to add a piece of 9” rigid duct to the bottom of the cyclone cone.

Being a physicist by trade, I naturally ask many questions. In this case: Is the manufacturers performance curve just hype? After reading Bill Pentz’s website I decided to measure it. Using a Dwyer Mark II Manometer equipped with a 166-6 Dwyer pitot tube, a clamp on ammeter, I carried out testing according to his prescription. I used 7” round duct. The tip of the pitot was about 16” from the cyclone inlet and the duct beyond was about 70” or 10x Duct Diameter. I made a needle valve using an old funnel and mounted it to the end of the duct I have carried out the experiment with the small mounting fixture and with a large plate as Bill Pentz describes to reduce the “vena contracta” with no noticeable difference in results. A nut on a threaded rod was turned to move the valve in and out of the duct. I started with the duct plugged and measured a static pressure of 12.25”. The amperage was 7.2 amperes. I should mention that this cyclone has a impeller that is 14.5”. I was a little concerned that the 2HP motor could burn up processing a lot of air. With the duct completely opened the amperage increased to 10.3 amperes. The motor plate says that the full load amps is 14 so I thought this was pretty good. That being said, the total HP works out to be something like 3 HP. I let it run for some time and didn’t notice any difference in drawn amperage and the motor didn’t seem to get really hot. I have carried out the experiment 3 times and verified that my results are reproducible with independent setups. The final result corrected for air density and the error bars are about 5%. I decided only to measure at the centre of the duct and multiply the CFM results by 0.9 as recommended by Dwyer. I have also provided the manufactures air flow in the diagram for reference.

I hope you find this review helpful. I tried to provide as much information as I could. People often talk about CFMs and Static Pressures and throw around a lot of jargon about dust collection with out really understanding the Dust collection problem or understanding that sometimes the manufactures provide us with numbers that we want to hear. I haven’t used my collector yet so I can’t talk about the efficiency of the fine dust collection and whether or not the filter area is sufficient for this collector. All I can say is that I am pleased so far…I’ll leave the rest for another review….

Update!!! July 25th 2012

I had called Grizzly several times concerning how to mount the switch to my isolation stand. They were very helpful each time. I was assured that they were going through the process of finding a mounting plate that would match my cyclone switch. Last week I obtained notification of shipment. I recieved it several days later and installed it a couple days ago. My cyclone is now complete thanks to Grizzly. Not sure if anybody else has dealt with Grizzly but my experience has been more than positive.

My dust collection is nearing completion and I have completed airflow, static pressure, and current measurements for the cyclone. I will post details soon. This thing moves some serious air!

1 year + update

I have had this DC for a little over a year now. I am quite pleased with the performance. After one year of use I started to notice a small difference in air flow. Nothing that I have measured but it seemed to be less than before. I have been cutting everything from hardwoods to softwoods and MDF. I decided to remove the air filter and inspect it. Overall it was in pretty good condition. The built in agitator appears to work well. I decided to blow out the filter with pressurized air and the performance is in tip top shape again. Overall, the collector was a good purchase. My shop is almost always clean except when I use hand tools! I feel that i would make the same decision again.

-- DJG




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djg

97 posts in 663 days



30 comments so far

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Brohymn62

120 posts in 757 days


#1 posted 663 days ago

Nicely Done, look forward to reading more!

-- Chris G. ; Los Angeles, CA

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Mainiac Matt

3481 posts in 830 days


#2 posted 663 days ago

Thanks for posting an objective technical review with testing and data to back up your conclusions. You certainly appear to have done as well as any of the WW mags, in terms of set up and data collection.

I’ve read most of BP’s web site and while I appreate him compiling a lot of good info., he sure seems to throw the accusations about manufacturers “cooking the data” to make their products look good….. around pretty freely (accept for the mamouth multi-thousand dollar, 5 HP clear view).... and seems to have an axe to grind. Maybe his greatest contribution will be detailing and promoting the use of this set up as a bench mark test set up…. and the woodworking community can get data from different sources that can then be compared on an apples to apples basis.

But shocker of shocker…. you tested a cyclone from an “importer of discount tools from Asia” and it sure looks to me like their published CFM curves give an accurate portrayal of the units capabilities.

Maybe I’m just getting tired of “fear” journalism accross the board.

PS… welcome to LJ’s …. please post some details of your CNC

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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PurpLev

8473 posts in 2150 days


#3 posted 663 days ago

thanks for the review, nice to see some options becoming available in the form of smaller cyclones.

I would be interested to hear how it actually performs at DC over time with machinery running and it pulling dust/fine-dust/shavings from them.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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b2rtch

4026 posts in 1549 days


#4 posted 662 days ago

it looks like the “protection” on the filter prevents a lot of air to come out.
Long time ago I had to make research on air flow trough holes of all kind (this was about cars, trucks and other radiator grills and vents in the engine hood in addition of the optimal fan design)).
I can tell you that this grill is very restrictive.
I think that it would be interesting to remove it to see what an improvement in air flow/suction you would get.

-- Bert

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djg

97 posts in 663 days


#5 posted 662 days ago

I tried to be as objective as possible. I am a physicist by trade so I have some knowledge in the area of fluid dynamics. I figured it would be a good opportunity to retune my skils. My wife had quite the chuckle watching me carry out experiments in my “Lab (workshop)”. Once the duct work is in place I will re measure the performance curve for the whole system. I have never seen data collected for a DC system under real world conditions. I am also interested in the DC performance over time and will post my experience.

Despite it’s look, I don’t think that the grill is that restrictive. In fact, the space between the outer edge of the pleat and the grill is about 3/8”. If the air was traveling at high speed, as in a fan application, then I think this would be the case. If we assume the air pressure is uniform within the filter, the air will exit uniformly through all the pleats, over an area of 96 sq. ft. As the air exits each pleat, it mixes with air exiting from adjacent pleats which significantly randomizes and therefore slows down the exit velocity of the air through the filter.

As for removing the filter, you will get a massive improvement in airflow. Filters always add static pressure to the system. If you have a performace curve for your actual system with recorded amperages, you can track your filter performance by looking at your amperage draw to a certain extent. When the filter clogs, static pressure increases and airflow decreases. For exactly this reason, I did not want to remove the filter for fear of processing too much air. Moving more air means doing more work. More work means more energy and more energy means more amperage. I believe that Bill Pentz recommends removing the filter for some of the testing. Amperage draw is probably one of them although i would have to check his site again. I see one problem with this collector may be adding some high volume large area Wynn filters. I am pretty sure that this will effectively decrease the static pressure in the DC system. If one ever decides to do so, they should monitor the amperage. You may run into a situation that Bill Pentz describes were a 2 HP motor running a 14” impeller would eventually burn up from over-amperage.

Dave

-- DJG

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GrandpaLen

1376 posts in 773 days


#6 posted 662 days ago

Welcome to LumberJocks , a world of advise, opinions, and experiences, all shared without judgement.

Thanks for sharing your stellar review.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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Alexandre

1417 posts in 692 days


#7 posted 662 days ago

Welcome! What filter does it come with?

-- My terrible signature...

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djg

97 posts in 663 days


#8 posted 662 days ago

It comes with a non-woven polyester, 96 sq ft, and is able to filter %99.9 of particles in the 0.2 to 2.0 micron range. This is better than the ASHRAE standard (I think) which is 0.5 microns. These filters are manufactured in Europe (according to Grizzly) by one of the worlds most respected filter manufacturers. The filters are BIA certified. I am unsure that the filter area is large enough. BP recommends 1 sq ft per every 2 cfm. This would mean that this dust collector would require a filter as large as 500 sq ft! Seems large. If the fine dust collection efficiency is high, you wouldn’t need 500 sq feet.

-- DJG

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Alexandre

1417 posts in 692 days


#9 posted 662 days ago

The nice thing about the onieda cyclones, Is that they come with Hepa filters.
I think Hepa is much better then the Merv 13 media.

-- My terrible signature...

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djg

97 posts in 663 days


#10 posted 662 days ago

There are many classes for HEPA but the onieda is up there. According to the MERV ratings, this filter would be > 16. Without the filters efficiency curve to compare apples to apples it’s hard to say which is better. Grizzly claims 99.9% greater than 0.2 microns rather than 0.3 at 99.97 for the HEPA standard…looks like either filters would function fine for wood dust.

-- DJG

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djg

97 posts in 663 days


#11 posted 661 days ago

I just noticed that the manometer I used was actually the Dwyer 475 Mark III digital manometer…

-- DJG

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Alexandre

1417 posts in 692 days


#12 posted 661 days ago

Thats actually good.
Enjoy your Dust collector!
I’m assuming that you are going to put permanent ductwork to your tools.
Since the G0440 has a 7” inlet, Are you going to have the 7” go on like this:

Example:
DC- = Dust collector
C = 7” ducting
O = 6” ducting
L= 5” ducting
T= 4” ducting

To tablesaw T To another tool For another tool 1….T…...T…......................3. T T T T O T DC-CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCOO 4.It could be for high CFM tools (Ex. CNC machines) O 2. O O L L T for 5” inlets.. To another tool
Each one is different
EDIT: Sorry about my diagram, I’ll draw it up on autocad.

And so on.
So, which style will you be using? Please specify if you are using the 1 or 2 or 3 or 4, or a combination of them, or are you reducing the inlet to 6”?

-- My terrible signature...

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djg

97 posts in 663 days


#13 posted 661 days ago

I will be running a 7” main. I was thinking of 6” but if I ever want to upgrade then the 7 would be more than sufficient for airflow. I will only be using one tool at a time. 6” drops to each machine should suffice. This will probably choke the air flow in the 7” main so the air speed may drop below 3800. I plan on using a barometric damper at the end of the 7” main to make up for lost air flow and increase the main air velocity. I believe that bill pentz mentions this on his site. It should work.

-- DJG

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Alexandre

1417 posts in 692 days


#14 posted 659 days ago

That should work…
Sorry, I’m on another computer.
My other one crashed and doesn’t seem like its working… wait… Hold on… I don’t know.

-- My terrible signature...

View Jeremy Greiner's profile

Jeremy Greiner

567 posts in 1273 days


#15 posted 627 days ago

@DJG
I appreciate the suggestion but it is a 220v dust collector which specifically falls outside of my range of usability. I’ve read a good deal of Bill Pentz information, besides being very overwhelming it’s difficult to judge because there really isn’t a good comparison between dust collectors.

I may not get perfect dust collection but I have to do the best I can with the situation I have.

-jeremy

-- Easy to use end grain cutting board designer: http://www.1024studios.com/cuttingboard.html

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