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Powermatics PM 2800 the ultimate Drill Press for the modern WoodWork Shop.

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Review by thedude50 posted 821 days ago 6411 views 0 times favorited 24 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Powermatics PM 2800 the ultimate Drill Press for the modern WoodWork Shop. Powermatics PM 2800 the ultimate Drill Press for the modern WoodWork Shop. Powermatics PM 2800 the ultimate Drill Press for the modern WoodWork Shop. Click the pictures to enlarge them

The beautiful, big black Powermatic 2800 Onyx variable speed 18” Drill press arrived well crated with sturdy wooden skids, a wood frame and heavy corrugated cardboard protecting all sides The crate was quite heavy, about 302 Lbs. so I recruited a helper to assist with the unpacking and assembly. We carefully unpackaged and inventoried all the component parts and hardware before proceeding with the assembly. The entire process took about 45 minutes including taking photographs while following the instruction manual throughout the entire We moved it to its permanent location in the shop with convenient power nearby. I was anxious to light up this beast and get the motor turning. Please click here to read the entire review and to see all the great photos

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech




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thedude50

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24 comments so far

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Joe Lyddon

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#1 posted 821 days ago

WOW!

Super COOL NEW drill press!

So, that’s why you’re selling planes! LOL

NICE!

Congratulations!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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Lenny

1235 posts in 2129 days


#2 posted 821 days ago

Congratulations on your purchase and for the review. It sounds like you purchased the Mercedes Benz of drill presses. In my opinion, you can’t go wrong with Powermatic. Whether a table saw, a jointer or a drill press, they do it right. Enjoy!

-- On the eighth day God was back in His woodworking shop! Lenny, East Providence, RI

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1080 days


#3 posted 821 days ago

thanks you guys I do love it and yes I agree Powermatic is the gold standard

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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Sarit

466 posts in 1742 days


#4 posted 821 days ago

Nice review.
Are you sure your run-out was 0.012” not 0.0012”? 12 thousandths actually sounds like a lot.

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ShipWreck

536 posts in 2355 days


#5 posted 821 days ago

Sweet drill press. I love the table setup. The larger crank is a nice feature as well.

Enjoy!

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1080 days


#6 posted 820 days ago

it does not say 12 thousandths it says .oo12 thousandths I am sorry if that is confusing i originally had it as .00012 which confused the editor and he said 12 thousandths it is actually 12 ten thousandths a tiny number it was the smallest run out of any drill press we have ever tested I hope this clears this up

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1080 days


#7 posted 820 days ago

ya know what kills me is I link this to my own site and 500 people opened this and only 147 of you read the whole review now that is sad that people wont even click through to get the whole story.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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Joe Lyddon

7622 posts in 2654 days


#8 posted 820 days ago

Lance… For $1,100, that is sure a lot of Drill Press!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1080 days


#9 posted 820 days ago

I think it would be a great drill press if they were asking 1500 for it I would still have chosen this press it is simply the best in its class.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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doordude

1085 posts in 1585 days


#10 posted 820 days ago

thanks dude50, for the great review. when i up grade from my 35 year old d.p. this is the i’ll buy.hopefuly this summer.

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1080 days


#11 posted 820 days ago

thanks for reading my review i do appreciate it my friend.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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Sarit

466 posts in 1742 days


#12 posted 819 days ago

Here is the quote cut and pasted from your article that confused me:
”I measured the Powermatic 2800 three times with a consistent run-out of less than 0.012 thousands of an inch which is beyond good.”

The issue is that you’re combining the decimal notation with the wording. You really only want one or the other.
Either say 0.0012 of an inch or 12 ten-thousandths or 1.2 thousandths.
Technically, 0.012 thousands means 0.012 * 0.001 = 0.000012”.

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1080 days


#13 posted 819 days ago

I am looking into this to change the article and this is the issue I am having the same as this guy below.

Coppied from the google forum.
How Do You Write Ten Thousands Of An Inch?

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Put very simply, you would write ten thousandth of an inch as 0.10. It can also be written as a fraction: 10/1000. There is often a great deal of confusion when it comes to dealing with ‘tenths’ of inches. The exact decimal length of all measurements tends to vary slightly depending on which context you are referring to. People often get confused because those who work in engineering and machinery have a slightly different way of saying one ten thousandth of an inch.
0.0100 is referred to as ten thousandth of an inch, however, machinists often refer to 0.0001 as a tenth. Another reason people get confused is because they refer to ten thousandth of an inch as one ten thousandth of an inch which is 0.0001. Traditionally a “tenth” of an inch is 0.1, which is correct for those of you who do not work in engineering. In manufacturing, a “tenth” is .0001” or one-ten thousandths of an inch which is shortened to a “tenth” for ease of referencing.
The American system of measurement, the Imperial system, often called the Standard English Measurement (SEM) is based on dividing any unit of measure in half instead of dividing a unit of measure by ten which is done in the metric system. The Imperial System commonly works with fractions but these can be converted into decimals but can only be broken down as small as sixty fourths.
If you hear ten thousandth of an inch being said and are confused as to what they are referring to, then put it into context and think about it logically. A newsreader who is quoting how much rain a State going through a drought has received is not going to mean one ‘tenth’ to be 0.0001 inches. It is all about switching the two slightly different meanings to suit the situation.
Was this community answer helpful? Blurtit is community driven Q&A, together we’re striving to continually improve this collective answer. So please help by rating this answer or adding your own answer.

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Anonymous Anonymous 96% helpful
There is always confusion when dealing with a “tenth” of an inch. In manufacturing and measurement where nearly all measurements are expressed in “thousandths” and sometimes mils (equal to .001” to confuse even more).

Traditionaly a “tenth” of an inch is 0.1”
In manufacturing a “tenth” is .0001” or one-ten thousandths of an inch. It is shortened to a “tenth”

Where as:
0.100 is one hundred thousandths (of an inch)
0.010 is ten thousandths (of an inch)
0.001 is one thousandths (of an inch)
0.0001 is one-tenth of a thousandths or what a machinists or mechanical engineer would say “one tenth” for short.

You need to understand who you are talking to and the context of the conversation. The weather man will say that “we received a “tenth” of an inch of rain last night”. He is saying we received 0.1” of rain not .0001” of rain.

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Anonymous Anonymous 90% helpful
Great answer! The previous answer trail has been pretty funny to read the mis-understanding of this topic. If I may expand more I’ll show how the naming convention changes as digits move to the left. Please follow the progression from the bottom-up on the list below:

1.0000
0.9000 is 900-thousandths
0.1000 is 100-thousandths (one hundred thousandths)
0.0900 is 90-thousandths (ninety thousandths)
0.0100 is 10-thousandths (ten thousandths)
0.0090 is 9-thousandths (nine thousandths)
0.0010 is 10-ten thousandths OR one thousandths
0.0009 is 9-ten thousandths
0.0001 is 1-ten thousandths OR one-tenth is your a machinist

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Anonymous Anonymous 64% helpful
Put simply without any explanation one ten-thousands of an inch is written as .010

The American system of measurement is the is based on dividing any unit of measure in half as opposed to dividing a unit of measure by ten as in the metric system. The American system of measurement was originally called the Imperial measurement system also known as Standard English Measure (SEM) now known as SAE after the Society of Automotive Engineers. The American system is fractional in nature and can be broken into as many decimal places as desired but is generally only broken down as far as sixty-fourths.

The American system can be defined by dividing the numerator in half as follows.

One inch = 1.000 or 1”
one half = .500 or 1/2”
one quarter =.250 or 1/4”
one eighth = .125 or 1/8”
one sixteenth = .0625 0r 1/16”
one thirtysecond = .03125 or 1/32”
one sixty fourth = .015625 or 1/64”

_
As you can see either way I write this people will be confused. This is not as simple as you would think I want to simply use the machinist number or .00012 this confused the editor and he called it 12 thousandths this would be a serious wobble in the press and that is simply not the case. I will be contacting a friend who writes technical manuals for dewalt and i will get the best way to notate 12 ten thousandths but people will still get confused as people don’t do well with fractions.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1077 days


#14 posted 819 days ago

I am looking into this to change the article and this is the issue I am having the same as this guy

Who is “this guy”? If you meant Sarit, don’t you think it would be nice to have a bit more respect for those who read your “reviews”?

and the sentence should read:

I am looking into this to change the article and this is the issue I am having, (comma) the same as this guy. (period)

Men, for 3 years of journalism you are pretty deficient in English.

As for how do you write ten thousands of an inch, I will explain as if you were a six year old:

1/1000= .001 this is one thousand of an inch.

.001×10= .01 this is 10 thousands of an inch or one hundred of an inch. Knowing the decimal system is useful.

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1080 days


#15 posted 819 days ago

Jgm, as you can see above it is not as simple as you think. Please re read the post. i copied buy the guy on Google as the guy I was talking about, sorry if you got lost. Also I am tired of telling people this but I am using dragon to type and often overlook saying comma or period, sorry if it screwed you up. But I was not referring to anyone who read the review. As you see the review was a work worthy of the effort to punctuate and edit.A chat room is simply that, if you cant read it please just pass on by. I don’t wish to be put down by a asshole like you .

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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