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Black Shellac

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Review by tenontim posted 01-06-2012 09:39 PM 5060 views 5 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Black Shellac Black Shellac No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I just made the picture frame in photo and decided to try the Black Shellac from shellac.net. Here’s the info from the distributor:
The BLACK is all natural from the raw materials.
No additional pigment or coloring is added.
• On Light toned woods, the First coat yields a rich
medium Cordovan (Bluish-Red) Mahogany.
• A second Coat is Deeper & Dark Cordovan toned Black.
• The third coat yields the BLACK
with a shadowed hint of DEEP Blackish-Purple.

This is not a de-waxed shellac, so if you will want to top coat it, apply a final coat of dewaxed shellac, so the final finish will adhere to it well.

I didn’t want a high gloss on this frame, so I mixed this in 1/2 lb cut, which would let me build the finish slowly.
Even at this thinner mix, the shellac was very black. It almost came out the way it was described on the web listing, which is for a 2 lb cut. I applied 6 coats on this frame and it came out darker than 2 feet up a stove pipe. I don’t see any purple at all, just black. This frame was made from western red cedar, by the way.

I talked to Ron (from shellac.net) on the phone and he said a lot of customers use the black to tint other shellac, in order to get the right color when color matching an older finish. Ron is always happy to talk about the uses of shellac and is very informative and helpful, so give him a call or drop an email if you have any questions.

I’m looking forward to coming up with a larger project to try this on. I would like to get some of the shellac retarder and use it as a spray on finish.

I’ve used the other shellacs from this company and have been very pleased with the freshness, and the black is no exception. I recommend you give it a try, if you have a project that you need to be very black.




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tenontim

2131 posts in 2402 days



18 comments so far

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6648 posts in 2637 days


#1 posted 01-06-2012 11:16 PM

Hi Tim,

I had no idea there was a black shellac!

It looks good.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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Dan'um Style

13003 posts in 2641 days


#2 posted 01-06-2012 11:58 PM

will have to try it myself someday

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View Tim Pursell's profile

Tim Pursell

494 posts in 2440 days


#3 posted 01-07-2012 01:07 AM

I can see some uses for this, never heard of it before. Thanks for posting about it.

-- http://www.etsy.com/shop/tpursell?ref=si_shop

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11659 posts in 2346 days


#4 posted 01-07-2012 01:45 AM

Who’dathunkit ? Black Shellac : )
Thanks for the info.
Any chance of getting a close-up of the finish on your frame project ?
Thanks.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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tenontim

2131 posts in 2402 days


#5 posted 01-07-2012 02:07 AM

I didn’t know it was out there either. Joe Lyddon posted asking if anyone had ever tried it, about a year ago. I just around to trying it now. I think it’ll open some interesting experimenting.

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Joe Lyddon

7732 posts in 2710 days


#6 posted 01-07-2012 02:57 AM

Very good, Tim!

Sounds good!

I like the idea of using it to darken other shellacs… cool…

Thank you for letting me know about your review.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Ole's profile

Ole

67 posts in 1735 days


#7 posted 01-07-2012 04:49 AM

You know, in the wild black shellac occurs as thin black discs… You can grind ‘em up and make your own black shellac ; )

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Joe Lyddon

7732 posts in 2710 days


#8 posted 01-07-2012 07:05 AM

Ole, all we have to is go out and find it… right?

Do you know where to look… Here in the USA??

Sounds like a nice way to get shellac!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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Ole

67 posts in 1735 days


#9 posted 01-08-2012 07:19 AM

It’s pretty easy if you have some old records to get rid of. I’m not kidding btw!

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7732 posts in 2710 days


#10 posted 01-08-2012 07:25 AM

Ole:

How OLD is OLD records?

78 rpm

45 rpm

33.3 rpm

... and what do you do with them to get Black Shellac?

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View derosa's profile

derosa

1556 posts in 1494 days


#11 posted 01-08-2012 07:33 AM

A quick search shows that 78s were made of about 1/3rd shellac up to the 50s.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7732 posts in 2710 days


#12 posted 01-08-2012 07:39 AM

Interesting!

Now, how do you get the shellac out?
Break-up (grind-up) into pieces and soak in denatured Alcohol?

Waxed or Dewaxed? LOL

I wonder where I put all of those records?!

Do any of the other record types use shellac… probably not… Plastic was invented… LOL

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

762 posts in 1906 days


#13 posted 01-08-2012 08:03 AM

www.shellac.net … great supplier we get raw flakes fro them all the time. Their garnet and button lac are also very nice. I like dewaxed garnet the best of all of them, use a thin cut of it as a base to build a richness in a lot of our finishes.

You can tung oil over it to waterproof it and protect it from alcohol spills too – especially dewaxed.

Everything we used from them has worked out very well. Everyone PLEASE keep supporting them – we need to maintain our supply chains!

Also think of it this way – if you keep shellac flakes in a dry dark place they keep almost indefinately. No more worrying about shelf life in cans just cut what you want about 2-3 days ahead of your finishing project and it will be ready to go.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2402 days


#14 posted 01-08-2012 01:20 PM

Thanks for the comments, Eric. I’ve been getting several different flavors of shellac from them for years also. I try to keep most of the colors on hand, and mix about 2 oz at a time. I use it mainly for repairs on antique furniture, but I’m starting to use it more on my new builds. We do need to support these suppliers.

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

762 posts in 1906 days


#15 posted 01-10-2012 10:33 AM

We usually mix at least a quart or gallon – just the volume w/ restorations and commissions always going on.

However it goes a long way -Two – three coats of thin cut shellac usually does it for us to get the color and and depth of the antique appeal in place.

I never got a chance to follow up – we were going to work with them on publishing some projects we’ve done over the years. One of these days i gotta follow up on that.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

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