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Review ToolSelect.com part #3 Jet Edge Sander

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Review by Kjuly posted 12-08-2011 02:03 PM 4281 views 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Review ToolSelect.com  part #3  Jet Edge Sander Review ToolSelect.com  part #3  Jet Edge Sander No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Part 2 concluded with links to two videos produced by ToolSelect.com. The reviews, Jet Drill Press -JDP-12 and the Jet Mortiser-JBM-5 were published shortly before I wrote part 1 & 2. The third tool review video, Jet Oscillating Edge Sander-JET 708447 OES-80CS, was not published at that time.

I found three issues with the operation of the edge sander. We, ToolSelect.com and I, felt it would be fair to share my findings with Jet and give them the opportunity to respond. Jet was contacted and they are sharing this information with their organization. I’ll keep you posted as new information develops.

http://www.toolselect.com/videos/video/JET-708447-OES-80CS-6-Inch-1-1-2-Horsepower-Oscillating-Edge-Sander

As you will see in the video, when a dust hose is attached to the edge sander’s dust hood, the added weight of the hose causes the hood to move away from the sander, reducing it’s efficiency. I replaced the locking knobs with a larger one to fix this problem.

In the contour sanding mode the dust hood has to be moved out of the way to allow the auxiliary table to be installed. The dust hood in this position reduces the dust collection to zero.

When changing from the horizontal to vertical sanding position, I found a problem with locking the sanding head at 90 degrees to the work platform. Without a positive stop to hold the head at 90 degrees, the user must look at the scale to determine if the sanding head is in the proper position. The scale is located where it can only be viewed from the end of the sander, which puts the locking mechanism out of reach.

In the video, I demonstrated how I fixed this issue by installing a indexing pin. The spring loaded pin locks into a hole drilled into the head, holding it at 90 degrees to the work surface.

On the positive side, I found the 1/2” oscillations to do good job reducing scratches left by the sanding belt. This and the graphite platen do a great job of reducing heat build up and the chance of burning your work. Heat reduction also extends the life of the sanding belt.

The 1.5 hp motor gives this machine plenty of power for the 6” belt. I quickly sanded several maple drawer boxes and enough parts to build six chairs.

I usually don’t give much consideration to storage space on a piece of equipment but this sander is the exception. The storage cabinet is large enough to store the auxiliary table and several sanding belts.

Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com




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Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days



9 comments so far

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1345 days


#1 posted 12-08-2011 03:01 PM

It is shameful for me to admit that I’ve never seen this machine; and I’m supposedly a JET guy. Ahhhhh, never mind! The top of the picture was cut off, lol. I thought it had some kind of shaper cutter and a indexing pin. This is a really nice machine; I’ve looked at it but it was a little too rich for my blood, given the type of projects I typically do. Thanks for the review!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Kjuly's profile

Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days


#2 posted 12-08-2011 03:19 PM

Hello AL,
I put a different picture in and it still cut the top off. I’ll have to find a different one.
Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com

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mondak

61 posts in 1052 days


#3 posted 12-08-2011 04:38 PM

I have seriously been looking at purchasing this sander, but now I think I will wait and see if jet (WMH) fixes the tilting and dust hood concerns. Thanks for the heads up.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1345 days


#4 posted 12-08-2011 05:08 PM

Very, very nice.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Kjuly's profile

Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days


#5 posted 12-08-2011 05:16 PM

Thanks Al,
Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

165 posts in 1342 days


#6 posted 12-08-2011 06:48 PM

Keith, I have one of these which I was able to purchase at a very good price about a year ago. I completely agree with the issues that you brought up in the review, particularly with the lack of positive stops. However I did not understand why you rated performance and quality as only 2 stars (you said that the motor was powerful and the machine would sand all day) but for the design you gave it a 3. Are you able to provide more details on the locking pin positive stop mechanism that you installed please?

-- Stuart

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Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days


#7 posted 12-08-2011 08:27 PM

Hello Stuart,
I gave the design a 3 star because I liked the ability to use the sander on edge or in the horizontal position. Most edge sanders are set up do only the one basic function, sanding at a right angle to the work platen. This machine will sand at different angles both by pivoting the head and/or using the miter gauge.
In regards to the quality and performance, you are right I have used it extensively and it sands well. I think I muddied the waters between quality/performance and design. To me, they are so closely related it’s hard to separate. For example… Design, the machine runs smooth and does it’s job but has an issue with the lack of positive stops. I see it as a design issue but it could also be looked at as a quality issue. I tried to be fair and honest in my rating but I can see where it could be confusing.
The stop mechanism was made from with a small corner bracket and a pull ring plunger. I didn’t know the proper name until I found it here.
http://innovative-components.knobsource.com/Asset/Short-Pull-Ring-Plunger.jpg
I purchased it at a local hardware.
The pull ring plunger was mounted on the corner bracket and the bracket was bolted to the sander base. I took the belt off and locked the head in the square position. I marked the location where the plunger pin contacted the head. I unlocked the head and pivoted it about an inch to see my mark and locked it. After marking the center, I drilled an 1/8” hole about 1/8” deep. Then I took a 1/4” drill bit (the diameter of the pin) and enlarged the first hole.
I hope that helps.
Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com

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Sanity

165 posts in 1342 days


#8 posted 12-09-2011 02:12 PM

Keith, thanks for the details. I will certainly try this, because today it is a 2 man job to correctly adjust the head. For my sander I am planning to construct a jig similar to the ones used by luthiers to create fretboards, i.e. for creating a convex radius.

-- Stuart

View Kjuly's profile

Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days


#9 posted 12-09-2011 02:32 PM

Hello Stuart,
I would love to see pictures of you jig.
Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com

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