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Review by burt posted 10-25-2011 04:05 PM 4658 views 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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This is a note to DynaBlue from the inventor: I read your review of the General Tools Mortise and Tenon Jig and wish to thank you for your expert review and analysis. If possible, I would like to be able to call DB and speak to him privately on some of the details, if you would please give me a way to call him.
I am particularly interested because I am the inventor and patent holder of this tool, so I want you to know that your criticism is completely fair and accurate and, as the designer, but not the manufacturer, I agree with you. However, as you found out, there are some limitations to the jig as it is, but it will, with a little care, make good mortise and tenon joints. I have made hundreds of them along the way and would be pleased to share some of them with you. As with any new technically advanced tool there may well be a learning curve, which, after some practice and experience, will do all that is asked of it.
Every problem you noted in your report is actively being attended to, with thanks to your diligence.




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burt

8 posts in 1100 days



7 comments so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3446 posts in 1502 days


#1 posted 10-26-2011 08:53 PM

Hello Burt,
Is there a way to avoid the flanging problem, with excess stock being left around a tenon? If you use the appropriate bit and bushing, is this still an issue with larger tenons?
I do not own one yet, but plan to take a close look at the woodworking show in November.
Also, any plans for a version that can handle angled mortise and tenons?
Thanks

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View burt's profile

burt

8 posts in 1100 days


#2 posted 10-27-2011 03:59 AM

Thank you for your question Pintodeluxe,
Yes, the “flanging” itself can be avoided by making sure your stock is within the “quarter dimension” tolerances for the thickness you wish. For example, if you’re working with 3/4” thick stock try to make sure it is actually no thicker than 3/4” and exactly centered in the jig, however, you will find in practice that if you do get a slight flange, or fence it simply snaps off cleanly with a push of your thumb inward against it. Even the corners will usually snap off cleanly and easily as well. After, you may only need to swipe the broken edge with a piece of sandpaper and it will be ready to join. As with any new jig, it will be good to make a few practice joints and you will soon find your own techniques and methods as well.

Re the angled version, there are no plans for that yet.

View wedgetail's profile

wedgetail

2 posts in 971 days


#3 posted 02-25-2012 11:13 PM

Have just bought this jig from Rockler very poor quality control on General tools part.
Centering Marks and Template Positioning Indicator marks have not been stamped on the Jig rendering it almost useless.

View burt's profile

burt

8 posts in 1100 days


#4 posted 02-26-2012 02:35 AM

Hello wedgetail, I can’t imagine your receiving a jig without centering marks and template positioning marks on it. It is obviously a serious factory error. I am going to contact the people at General Tools on Monday and you will hear from them right away as I’m sure they will solve this right away.
The EZ Mortise and Tenon Jig is a good one and will make perfect joints every time so please don’t give up on it.

Burt

View woodmaker's profile

woodmaker

266 posts in 1380 days


#5 posted 10-18-2012 05:31 PM

What does it take to center the lumber in the jig? I can’t seem to get a centered cut on the mortise or the tennon.
Also, what do you recommend to get the mortise centered? When I lower the router bit into the wood it wanders off.
I’ve only made a few practice cuts, got frustrated and quit.

-- Mike

View burt's profile

burt

8 posts in 1100 days


#6 posted 10-19-2012 06:59 PM

Mike, I’m sorry that you are having problems with our mortise and tenon jig. Let me see if I can help because I know that we have made thousands of joints and have examples of many users making successful projects using this jig.

In regard to centering the stock, the instructions #2 on page 7 of the user’s manual illustrate clearly how to adjust the centering wall (4) for the nominal center of the stock you are using. If your stock is not exactly centering it may be slightly off (thicker or thinner) from the standard quarter size indicated on the end of the centering wall (4A). If this is the case and you wish it to be exact you may put a thin shim between the wall and your stock such as a layer or two of masking tape or the like to bring it to where you like. However, Please note the “Hint” at the bottom of the page suggesting that you always keep matching surfaces to the same side of the jig so their faces will always match.

In regard to your question about centering the mortise I cannot understand why the wood would “wander off” when you lower the bit into it except that it may not have been securely clamped enough. As we have noted in instruction #7 on page 12 of the manual, we recommend cutting the mortise with successive overlapping plunges to depth and then moving the router back and forth through the template to clean the mortise slot.

I hope this helps and that you begin to enjoy the many advantages of our mortise and tenon jig. There is an instruction film available on line at www.generaltools.com if you would like to see it.

Burt

View woodmaker's profile

woodmaker

266 posts in 1380 days


#7 posted 10-26-2012 04:28 PM

Sorry I didn’t mean to say that the wood wanders off. it’s the spiral bit; when I go to insert it into the jig. I may have the wood in the jig too low and the guide is too far away and causes the wander (maybe)?
I’ve gotten some pretty good tennons, but the mortise not so much.

I’ll check those directions again, plus the bit size might be my issue after I thought about it. If I’m using 3/4” stock then I should use the same size bit right, and vice-a-versa 1/2” for 1/2 ” stock?

-- Mike

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