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Amazing lathe for amazing price

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Review by ChadR posted 08-28-2011 07:27 AM 5700 views 4 times favorited 33 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Amazing lathe for amazing price Amazing lathe for amazing price Amazing lathe for amazing price Click the pictures to enlarge them

I was looking for a starter lathe, and found the website http://www.edmwi.com/home/edm/page_1225_164/new_electric_wood_lathe__table_top_40_industrial_4.html
I was surprised with the price. Only $89. I thought it was too good to be true but figured I would give it a try. I thought if the thing ends up being fake or plastic I can always try and sell it on craigslist.

When it arrived in the mail I was amazing by the size of the box. After opening I was again shocked. The thing is huge, over 4’. I found it was made out of steel and it has a 4 speed adjustment. I am very happy with my purchase and cant believe this was so cheap. Compared to a name brand lathe, such as Jet, I save over $300. If you need a easy lathe and can do large projects I suggest you look at this.

UPDATE for usnadad.

usnadad requsted that I post a photo of explain how the speed changers looks and works. It’s rather easy. just moving the belt manually from one wheel to another. Much like you would a bike chain. Here is a photo.

Also here are some photos of the lathe in action. It worked great for my first turning project.



-- Some people have a way with words... some people... not... have way.




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ChadR

80 posts in 1232 days



33 comments so far

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1394 days


#1 posted 08-28-2011 09:16 AM

@ChadR, Please update after you have used this for a few spins around the block. I commend your bravery to post a cheap tool and with 5 stars to boot. There are some real gems out there, though few and far between. This could be one. Thanks.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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ChadR

80 posts in 1232 days


#2 posted 08-28-2011 09:46 AM

Yes you are correct. I will make sure to give a proper review of the full working quality of this product after a few, turns. I did give it my first attempt with improper tools, as I do not have them yet. And its worked great. I will have to give a full review after I have made my first turned wood project.

-- Some people have a way with words... some people... not... have way.

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usnadad

6 posts in 1220 days


#3 posted 08-28-2011 02:17 PM

It would be nice to know “What’s in the box”.

Also, I note in the web site’s product description the speed changes are performed “internally”. It would be great to know how this is done and how well the user manual explained the process.

TIA!

Looks like a potential benefit for entry level turners…

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

719 posts in 1257 days


#4 posted 08-28-2011 04:14 PM

I’m interested too. It looks similar to a lathe sold in Australia branded as “GMC”. Now GMC equipment doesn’t necessarily have the best reputation in Oz, but there may be gems in their range so I’m keen to see how you go.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

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AUBrian

85 posts in 1426 days


#5 posted 08-29-2011 01:26 AM

Looks just like the one I bought made by Central Machinery several years back. Some things to be aware of:
1) The locking nut on the tail does tend to loosen itself up as you turn, be ready to retighten periodically.

2)You have to but a adapter, or else one particular mount to change head. Mine came with an additional head, howeverI wanted one with 4 moveable fingers instead. The only one I could find was at Harbor Freight for their 40” lathe.

3) The bed can flex rather easily, so I have actually flexed it when trying to secure a piece and tightening the tail too much.

Other than that, I’ve never had any problems from it, and it has done all I’ve ever asked.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1987 days


#6 posted 08-29-2011 04:33 AM

Yep, like others have said, that is the same lathe as the Harbor Freight 40” lathe. The stamped steel bed can be somewhat flexible. I saw someone on one of the forums had reinforced it by filling the bed with wood stiffeners epoxied in I believe. Good enough as a starter, and probably better than tube type lathes. Please post a in depth review of this lathe after say a year or so of use and let us know how you like it then. I know a couple of occasional turners that have these (with the Harbor Freight, or Rand labels) and they have been using them for the last 5 or so years for an occasional project with great success.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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rance

4149 posts in 1915 days


#7 posted 08-29-2011 04:51 AM

MT2 or MT3 in the headstock and tailstock?

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View crank49's profile

crank49

3524 posts in 1726 days


#8 posted 08-29-2011 05:08 AM

If it’s the same as HF its MT1.
Also, 3/4×16 TPI I think.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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DamnYankee

3240 posts in 1317 days


#9 posted 08-29-2011 05:13 AM

Thanks for the post. A lathe is a bit further down my wish list, but as I would most deffinately be a entry level turner, it is nice to get these kinds of reviews.

-- Shameless - Winner of two Stumpy Nubs Awards

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1394 days


#10 posted 08-29-2011 05:33 AM

It may very well be from the same manufacturer, etc. but there are some differences:

The four speeds are not the same.
This reviewed lathe has a metal base plate from end to end that HF does not. More sturdy ?
The reviewed lathe ad says that the color will now be gray.
The price … The rated lathe = $118.21 shipped no tax req’d HF = $244.96 shipped and tax.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1394 days


#11 posted 08-29-2011 06:04 AM

The riding crops are on aisle 69, smith2. and they don’t take no stinking coupons.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View ChadR's profile

ChadR

80 posts in 1232 days


#12 posted 08-29-2011 07:12 AM

Usnada, I posted pictures of the speed change.

As for 3/4×16 TPI, I am not sure what the means at all. sorry. =(

-- Some people have a way with words... some people... not... have way.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1394 days


#13 posted 08-29-2011 07:27 AM

Sorry about post #11 as it was to a spammer post. Now they took it away and it seems I’ve lost my mind. lol

I believe that’s the chuck shaft size: 3/4” diameter and 16 threads per inch. Very common size and useful to know if you are getting an aftermarket self-centering 4 jaw chuck, for example.

The speed changes as shown are like many lathes and drill presses. Really easy and the motor gets to run at one speed regardless.

About how much does it weigh ?

Thank you so much for the additional pics. I’m ordering one tonight. Great post and review.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View ChadR's profile

ChadR

80 posts in 1232 days


#14 posted 08-29-2011 08:31 AM

Oh make, That is good to know. The weight of the lathe is 70lbs. Most of that in the motor end. It was rather fun to watch the FedEx delivery guy try and carry the box over his shoulder.

I am excited to see someone else buying this lathe from my review.

-- Some people have a way with words... some people... not... have way.

View SafferinOz's profile

SafferinOz

151 posts in 1629 days


#15 posted 08-29-2011 10:46 AM

I have a “GMC” lathe, the same one that Tootles describes in post #4.
They aren’t the best lathes on the market and never will be, however they are good value for money and great for learning on (as I currently am).
To get the most out of this lathe an aftermarket self-centering 4 jaw chuck is almost a must. It allows for better control of the work piece, reduces the risk of injury (safety benefits) and improves the quality of the finished product.
It also helps to mount the lathe on a sturdy table or stand, thereby reducing vibration and increasing the enjoyment of your new toy.
All the bowls in my projects have been done on one of these budget lathes.

-- Stephen, Perth Western Australia, My inspiration – the Carpenter from Nazareth!

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