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The Portamate PM7000 Miter Saw Stand and Power Tool Work Center

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Review by David Grimes posted 1203 days ago 6692 views 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
The Portamate PM7000 Miter Saw Stand and Power Tool Work Center No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I just received this glorified miter saw stand. It was well packaged and delivered undamaged. Assembly was very simple and straightforward as were the instructions.

I have been looking at this and the Craftsman version for quite some time. The only differences in the two are paint color (Portamate orange, Sear red), the Sears only has one wheel whereas the Portamate has two… and the Sears is about $50 higher in price. I got mine for $199, no tax and free shipping.

This item comes with a “free” vise and worklight. Both appear to be useful items that perform their intended function.

There are three (3) fully adjustable roller supports with flip stops (one each at the ends of the support arms and the third on the light mount that can be positioned anywhere on the sturdy extruded aluminum main rail). I had them all level and aligned with my 10” sliding miter saw table height in a very few minutes.

The telescoping support arms allow a whopping 114” of spread when both sides are fully extended. Fully retracted results in a minimum spread of 65 1/2”.

There is a built-in switched and lighted power strip with four (4) grounded 120 volt receptacles. There are hinged cover flaps for each to keep dust out when not in use.

There is a built-in storage compartment with hinges plastic cover that measures 1 1/2” deep x 2 1/4 high x 10 1/2” wide. I would put this lid at the top of the list of “most easily breakable”. However, I can probably use this for many years without tearing it off its hinges.

Extra pairs of machine mounts are readily available for about $25 each. They can be mounted beneath miter saws, sanders, scroll saws, drill presses, etc. etc. and remain on the machines (they have flat bottoms and hard rubber feet) for very simple and quick attachment to the work station, then easy removal after use. I will use this for my miter saw mainly, but I will also use my scroll saw and belt/disc sander here as well.

I read many reviews at several sites while deciding on whether or not to purchase this item. One complained of being unable to get a replacement bulb from Sears. I will cross that bridge when I come to it. Several others complained about the Sears one-wheel version being difficult to transport and maneuver. I am not even going to assemble my two wheels since mine will not be transported. Other complaints (or in some cases worries) had to do with the plastic handles used throughout the unit and including on the machine mounts. My take on those concerns: I believe I can personally use this station and all the plastic adjustment handles for many years without damaging them from over-torquing. However, I don’t see anything on this unit that could not be easily repaired or even upgraded with new handles, carriage bolts, even a spot weld if ever needed. I don’t expect that to be necessary. it seems sturdy enough for my purposes.

This work center is loaded with useful features that are not even available on the run-of-the-mill miter saw stands at any price. At $199 this is a steal. It would be a great addition for most home shops and even the serious craftsman if used as a shop fixture. Park it. Use it. Drag it around the shop. it will be fine.

On the other hand, if i were to take this fine product out of my shop and deliver it to my crew (where it would get shop usage and job-site usage), I would say that two months tops and most of the peripheral accessories would be rendered MIA or FUBAR. We have the Dewalt stands for the rough piling onto and transport. They don’t have much to fall off except the stop and the feet cups (gone long ago).

I gave four stars for features, value, and basic sturdiness. It probably should be 5 stars because of the value to price. If this same design were beefed up in just a few ways, it would then cost significantly more and would still be fragile for rough abuse and transport just due to all the appendaged peripherals it is covered in.

I’m glad I bought it. I would recommend it to a friend.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia




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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1238 days



4 comments so far

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1238 days


#1 posted 1201 days ago

Deke,

That is exactly how I am already using it. We used it all weekend working on both the home shop project and a quick play-swings-for-the-grandkids project that took about 2 hours to complete (except concrete drying). BTW, the work light came in really handy helping to see the pencil marks on the wet treated 4×4 lumber. No regrets.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1238 days


#2 posted 1200 days ago

Deke,

The three rollers have flip tops to use as stops and are adjustable anywhere along the main rail (except where the saw itself is located). The saw is easily moved anywhere on the rail as well.

Two of my three stops are solid for repetitive cuts. The third wobbles a little, but I see why: The bottom plate has a small bow in it that lets it rock a tiny bit. I could probably tighten it more to flat, but I will permanently fix it easily the next time I think about it. I’ll put it on a flat surface and mallet the face where needed with a brass rod. I mean it is barely out.

Another thing: The paint job is powder coated orange and is the same color orange as the Ridgid tools. It looks like it was neant to set across from my Ridgid table saw.

Regards,

David Grimes

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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David Grimes

2072 posts in 1238 days


#3 posted 1176 days ago

Update: I am still really liking this work station. I have purchased several more pairs of the machine mounts and now have the following tools mounted and ready for quick on and off of the work station beam: miter saw, 11 inch bandsaw, table top drill press, vise, combination belt/disk sander, scroll saw, and bench grinder.

Each of the mounts have feet so that they can be left on the tool permanently and sit on the floor, a shelf, or on a table top when not mounted on the work station.

Finally, I have found out that the beam is available all by itself for about $100 US shipped. I am seriously considering getting that second beam and using it to make a second “fixed” station to mount the bandsaw, the drill press, the belt/disk sander, and scroll saw all at once since they don’t require the wide material support that a miter saw almost always does. I’ll leave the miter saw on the full work station almost all the time.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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