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Awesome product, exactly as advertised

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Review by JasonD posted 12-07-2010 07:55 AM 3187 views 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Awesome product, exactly as advertised Awesome product, exactly as advertised Awesome product, exactly as advertised Click the pictures to enlarge them

My jointer plane is a vintage Stanley #7 SweetHeart that I bought off of eBay for $60. I spent a day truing up the sole and frog, along with another 3 or so days working on the blade and chipbreaker. I’ve used it like that for a few months, sharpening the blade about once a week as needed. It always worked “okay”, but I felt like it could be better.

This was the first and only jointer plane I’ve ever owned. So I didn’t really have anything to compare it to as far as premium planes like Lie-Nielsen and Veritas were concerned. About a week ago, I decided to spend a bit one one of IBC’s matched plane / chipbreaker sets as an early Christmas present to myself. During the week long wait for it to arrive, I began dimensioning the boards for my new bench’s top using the old blade / chipbreaker.

The new blade / chipbreaker arrived today and I spent some time tonight planing up the next board to add to the top laminations. I can’t begin to describe how smooth and effortless the IBC blade cuts compared to the original Sweetheart blade. I glided through shaving after shaving, leaving the board glass smooth and ready for glue-up.

Before tonight, hand planing felt a lot like work. Now, it’s total bliss.

Before I bought this blade set, I was seriously considering dropping the money to buy a Veritas bevel-up jointer plane. I have no doubt that I would have been 100% happy with a Veritas plane, I am so thankful that I was able to get what I imagine is the same (or at least close) kind of quality / experience for less than half the price.

The pictures above include 2 side by side shots to compare the size of the original blade to the IBC replacement blade. As you can see in the 2nd picture, the IBC blade / chipbreaker are at least twice as thick as the original. The third picture shows the new blade set in my jointer plane.




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JasonD

180 posts in 1585 days



17 comments so far

View dfdye's profile

dfdye

372 posts in 1760 days


#1 posted 12-07-2010 12:42 PM

I have an IBC A2-Cryo blade in my No 7 and No 4, and I’ll absolutely agree that they are wonderful blades. I have been using mine for a while now, and I can say with certainty that they hold up to a lot of work before needing sharpening. They came fairly well sharpened out of the box, but they still needed touch-up honing. The backs were nice and flat, and I didn’t have to spend much time to get them in “easy shaving” shape.

I’ll definitely keep them near the top of my list for replacement blades, though with the durability of the A2-cryo, I am not sure if I will ever come close to wearing a blade out in my lifetime!

-- David from Indiana --

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Marc5

304 posts in 2065 days


#2 posted 12-07-2010 01:01 PM

I may try this set up on a #4 iI am getting ready to tune. On question, did you have to modify the throat due to the additional thickness of the blade and ship breaker?

-- Marc

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JasonD

180 posts in 1585 days


#3 posted 12-07-2010 03:20 PM

@David, after my experience with this blade, I’m definitely going to get the IBC 2” blade for my #4 Stanley.

@Marc, I was expected to need to modify the throat, but I didn’t have to. When I first got the plane, I filed the throat a little to square it up when I was first tuning it, but I’m guessing the original owner opened the throat a bit when they had it.

The blade set comes with paperwork that tells you to expect to widen it along with simple how-to instructions. It also comes with a free DVD that shows you how to completely tune up an old plane and modify it to use the IBC blades. The DVD had a handful of tips I’d never seen before.

View Rick Boyett's profile

Rick Boyett

167 posts in 1936 days


#4 posted 12-07-2010 04:27 PM

Just a counter point here:

The Rob Cosman IBC Pinnacle blade that is featured here cost $106.00

Jason’s #7 was $60.

That’s $166 for the tool and blade. That doesn’t cover the cost of his time refurbishing the blade.

Now for comparison is the Veritas Bevel-Up Jointer at $275.00.

The Veritas is $109 more but you get a plane made of ductile iron instead of gray iron. It has an adjustable throat and the option to put a fence ($35 option) on it without any modification. As with any Veritas tool you don’t have to do ANY fine tuning. It comes sharp and square, right out of the box. The same goes for any LN tool.

So if you want a tool with more features and durability, you should consider the Veritas (or an LN). This should also be the case if you don’t want to spend your time refurbishing an old plane. Some folks (like myself) like taking a 75 to 100+ year old plane and returning it to its usable glory. Others want to spend more of their time actually working on projects. Neither direction is wrong, I’m just offering differing points of view.

As for the Pinnacle blade itself. I have found that they are usable right out of the box but they will really shine if you give them a good lapping before use. What really impresses me about the Rob Cosman Pinnacle blade is the very innovative method they came up with to let you use a thick blade with a new chip maker and still be able to fully utilize the blade depth adjuster. That was truly a “why didn’t I think of that” kind of creation.

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JasonD

180 posts in 1585 days


#5 posted 12-07-2010 05:57 PM

Good points, Rick. I was telling my wife the other day that I’d still like to get a Veritas eventually.

For one thing, I’d like to have a modern premium plane just for the sake of the tool collector in me. Secondly, for the reasons you mentioned: mainly, the newer innovative features.

In the meantime, though, I’m more than happy with the quality that I’m able to get out of a vintage Stanley with the IBC blade.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3936 posts in 2386 days


#6 posted 12-07-2010 10:49 PM

Anybody have any sense about how these compare with Ron Hock’s blades?

The IBC Pinnacle blades are a little higher in price … are they better than Hock blades?

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View yuri's profile

yuri

135 posts in 2326 days


#7 posted 12-07-2010 11:54 PM

Interesting, how is this blade set different from Hock’s similar set?
Cheapbraker
A2 Iron
Together they come to $78

View JasonD's profile

JasonD

180 posts in 1585 days


#8 posted 12-08-2010 02:34 AM

@Gerry, I can’t comment since I haven’t had a chance to try the Hock blades yet. I would love to know if anyone has used them both.

@Yuri, actually, it would be a little cheaper. The A2 blade you linked is a block plane blade for $45. The blade to compare to my IBC would be a 2-3/8” blade which is surprisingly cheaper ($40) than the smaller 1-3/8” block plane blade.

Btw, I forgot to mention it above, but the success I had with the IBC blade was directly out of the package. I didn’t tune the new blade up at all.

View yuri's profile

yuri

135 posts in 2326 days


#9 posted 12-08-2010 02:59 AM

Oops, I got corrected, I messed up the link. It should be Corrected link to A2 Iron 2-3/8 which is $49 instead of $45, so total will be $82, still better than $106

View dfdye's profile

dfdye

372 posts in 1760 days


#10 posted 12-08-2010 03:56 AM

I have not personally witnessed this, but I have heard a couple of reports of Hock blades being received a little out of flat. I was going back through post to see if I could find where I read this, but no luck. Obviously with the “ruler trick” this isn’t too big of a deal, but both of my IBC blades were spot on out of the package.

For what it is worth, the blade I am buying for my “new” type 13 No 4 Bailey will be a Hock blade, just so I can compare the two brands. I seriously doubt I’ll notice any difference between them once they are set up, but I’ll most definitely be posting observations!

-- David from Indiana --

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3936 posts in 2386 days


#11 posted 12-08-2010 04:42 AM

David—I’d be interested in your reactions once you have a chance to compare. I have a #4 with a pretty marginal blade that I was thinking of fitting out with either a Hock or a Pinnacle (both the blade and the chip breaker).

FWIW, I have Hock blades in my #4, one of my #5’s, and in my #7. When I first got them (about 18 months ago) I did lap the backs on them and run through the sharpening regimen with my Work Sharp 3000. I have used them quite a bit, and do not recall having to re-sharpen (the Hock blades do hold an edge) ... just an occasional touch-up with 3000-grit in the WS. Tonight I did some work with my #7, and that old war horse fairly glides through maple stock, throwing off thin, full width shavings. I love that plane!

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View JasonD's profile

JasonD

180 posts in 1585 days


#12 posted 12-08-2010 06:01 AM

Yuri, Curious to see the 2nd link you posted. The one I was talking about is here which is only $40. Unless I’m missing something they’re selling the same blade at two different prices. Both blades are 7” long 3/32” thick A2 hardened to RC62.

View yuri's profile

yuri

135 posts in 2326 days


#13 posted 12-08-2010 06:35 AM

Jason,

The link I posted leads to A2 blade. Your link is for O1 (high carbon, not A2) blade.
Hocks A2 is also cryogenicaly treated like Pinnacle one. Usually A2 stays sharp longer, but more difficult to sharpen. O1 sharpens pretty easy to very fine edge, but requires a little bit more frequent trips to a waterstone. A lot of people do not mind extra trip and just love high carbon blades.

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JasonD

180 posts in 1585 days


#14 posted 12-08-2010 06:59 AM

Yuri, thanks for the clarification. It looked like both descriptions read the same to me. I didn’t see where they said A2 or O1.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1955 days


#15 posted 12-08-2010 06:19 PM

I am looking to add a #6 and a #7 to my plane collection. I am wanting to go with old iron Stanleys this time around and figure I will need to modernize the iron and chipbreaker. I am on the fence between IBC and Hock. Has anyone done a side by side comparison between the two? Depending on the sales they are close enough in cost to not matter much…

I may upgrade my Groz #5 first though. I have done everything I can for the OE blade and it just cuts lousy. I can swap over the blade from the #4 and its fine, but that blade from the #5 stinks…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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