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A bit on the pricey side, but extremely well made, and solves a huge problem.

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Review by dbhost posted 06-16-2010 02:32 AM 2974 views 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
A bit on the pricey side, but extremely well made, and solves a huge problem. No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

A few months ago, I added Norton white oxide wheels to my 8” grinder that I use for sharpening only to be rewarded with a grinder that tried dancing across the shop…

The pitiful bushings that Norton includes with their grinder wheels, well… Norton should be ashamed of themselves for including them. These things are a waste of money for Norton to include, and a waste of shipping space. SHAME ON YOUR NORTON!!!! These things have TONS of slop in them, and allow the wheel to basically rotate around the grinder shaft more like an eccentric shaft. Whoever thought of those stupid plastic inserts needs to look for a new line of work. Obviously they stink as engineers…

I was pointed to McMaster Carr for nice machined steel bushings. Yes they were a little spendy for such a simply chunk of metal, but they were a dead on fit…

Now to get them installed right, considering my coastal, salty air climate, I opted to insure I would be able to remove them when I needed to without getting a gear puller out, by treading the grinder shaft with some Anti Seize compound. Slip the bushing on, then work the wheel on to the bushing. Install outer flange and nut, tighten, and test spin…. Reinstall shrouding and test spin.

Then… The Geiger’s Dressing and Truing Solution was FINALLY put to work. (I have been hammering back and forth since, oh… February on getting and using this…. Sorry Don, but life has been odd this spring… Anyway, I had resisted buying this thing due to the price tag, especially since the Wolverine dresser was at least $10.00 cheaper. After seeing how this thing is put together, and using it though, I understand where the extra money goes… And this is a dresser worth its price for sure!

Anyway, after it is all said and done, I now have a grinder that is smooth running. I had a roughing gouge that was left unsharpened for a couple of months, that I got a quick grind on, beautiful and sharp!

All and all, I couldn’t be happier. Yes there is a touch of vibration left, but I have been around bench grinders a LONG time, and I have never used one anywhere nearly as smooth as this one. I’m as pleased as punch…

Pros: Easy to use, extremely well machined, made in the U.S.A., works EXACTLY like it is supposed to, very good results.

Cons: The price tag is a bit steep for something that shouldn’t get used all that heavily. However, it IS made well enough that I wouldn’t hesitate for a second using it in a production shop…

Overall impression. Money well spent, but you may have to do some serious convincing of yourself to spend the kind of money they want for these…

If you are interested in them, check out his web site....

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com




View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1985 days



9 comments so far

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1801 days


#1 posted 06-16-2010 06:22 PM

“The pitiful bushings that Norton includes with their grinder wheels, well… Norton should be ashamed of themselves for including them. These things are a waste of money for Norton to include, and a waste of shipping space. SHAME ON YOUR NORTON!!!! These things have TONS of slop in them, and allow the wheel to basically rotate around the grinder shaft more like an eccentric shaft. Whoever thought of those stupid plastic inserts needs to look for a new line of work. Obviously they stink as engineers…”

I fully agree with you.

I too bought one of this white wheel and I experienced the same exact problem, the wheel is out of balance and out of round.
Shame on Norton for selling such a poor product.

-- Bert

View Jack Barnhill's profile

Jack Barnhill

366 posts in 2119 days


#2 posted 06-18-2010 12:49 AM

Thanks for you review of the Norton wheels and The Geiger’s Dressing and Truing Solution. Are there better wheels out there for a reasonable price? That is considering the additional cost of the 3rd party bushings.

The Geiger’s Dressing and Truing Solution looks like a great tool but the price is more than a little steep for my budget. I probably won’t see one of these in my shop until I can sell something I make in the price range of an original Maloof rocker.

Great review.

-- Best regards, Jack -- I may not be good, but I'm slow -- www.BarnhillWoodworks.com

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1985 days


#3 posted 06-18-2010 01:41 AM

It is a pricey item for sure. And just look at my workshop page… I am not the kind to spend top dollar on anything… But I also don’t want to end up with tools that don’t do what they are supposed to…

As far as other white oxide wheels are concerned, there is CGW Abrasives, and you don’t want to know what they cost…

My issue with the Norton wheels is primarily the bushings are total junk. The wheel itself is okay. It would have been better for them to make the wheels and offer the bushings separately so that the customer can get the right fit the first time instead of having a violently vibrating grinder… It was pretty obviously a cost reduction issue, and one that is easily fixable, but falls under the category of rude surprises…

FWIW, the Norton Wheels were something like $20.00 each. So what did I expect right? The bushings came from McMaster Carr, and ran me $9.20 each + S&H, and will outlast a series of wheels… And most likely the grinder itself.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15089 posts in 2429 days


#4 posted 06-18-2010 09:16 AM

That looks like what I need. The old diamond wheels were always a bit of a joke, they just break the glaze :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1985 days


#5 posted 06-20-2010 07:38 AM

Alternatives to Norton in the area of the Aluminum Oxide grinder wheels are hard to come by. Any suggestions?

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View velo_tom's profile

velo_tom

118 posts in 1769 days


#6 posted 06-20-2010 06:26 PM

I’ve had the same problem with the white Norton wheel. When I turned on the grinder the first time the wheel wobbled so bad I expected it to fly off at any moment. I pulled out the crappy stack of plastic bushings pushed on the stack to make a very slight slope for better grip. Then I epoxied the stack on both sides to stiffen it up. The wheel is running true now but I’ve not used it much and don’t know how long it will last.

-- There's no such thing as mistakes, just design changes.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1985 days


#7 posted 06-20-2010 08:35 PM

I’ve heard of the epoxy trick, and I guess I could have gone that route, but I wanted a more secure / permanent solution to the problem… Have you dressed / trued up the wheels yet? The bushings made 75% of the difference the dresser made up the other 25%...

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View velo_tom's profile

velo_tom

118 posts in 1769 days


#8 posted 06-20-2010 09:39 PM

I’m not saying the epoxy is a good solution. I’m pretty nervous whenever the wheel is running. If I would have known I could order something for a proper fix I likely would have gone that route. I’ve book marked the link you have provided and am seriously considering the purchase. I’m certainly not to happy with Norton for sending such junk along with the wheel.

We use epoxy to hold test instrumentation in place here at work and it holds up pretty well. But, my hands are not hovering next to these pieces while the parts are spinning. Seems in my old age I’m getting to be a wimp about the idea of injuries.

-- There's no such thing as mistakes, just design changes.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15089 posts in 2429 days


#9 posted 06-21-2010 01:21 AM

That is because they take so much more time to heal :=)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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