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Hitachi Cordless Drill

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Review by Kjuly posted 02-06-2010 07:01 PM 5785 views 0 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Hitachi Cordless Drill No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

My old Delta cordless drill, drilled it’s last hole after four plus years of service. It was a 14 volt drill that served me well. The drill is in decent shape but the batteries would not hold a charge long enough to drive a 2? drywall screw. To replace the two batteries would cost over $75.00. I do not want to put that kind of money in to batteries with the life of the drill motor uncertain. Time to go shopping for a new cordless drill.

First, lets look at what I need in a drill and how it will be used. I build custom cabinets and furniture so most of my work is accomplished in the shop. The fewer cords under foot the better so a cordless works well. Many times I use two drills, a corded one for drilling holes and the cordless to drive the screw. I do the installations myself, so a long battery life is important, as is a quick charge, but the most critical features are the weight and overall size. I prefer a smaller drill for working in tight spaces and one that is on the lighter side to reduce fatigue.

I chose the Hitachi DS 10Fl, that I found on Amazon http://bit.ly/aqDWCs for $99.00 and free shipping. It weighted in at 2.2 pounds which had me concerned that it would lack enough power to drive larger screws. The advertisement read Hitachi DS10DFL 12-Volt Peak Li-Ion 2 Speed Drill/Driver but it has a 10.8 volt Lithium-ion battery. I don’t know what they mean by “12 volt peak” and really don’t care.

After installing a complete set of kitchen cabinets, including installing door hinges and drawer slides, I can say that this little drill really packs a punch.

It has plenty of power and the 40 minute (or less) charger meant there was no waiting for a fresh battery. The clutch worked as advertised and the keyless chuck held the bit firmly. The forward/reverse switch is in an excellent location, located just above the trigger. One can easily change direction using your thumb or forefinger, allowing for a convenient one handed operation. This function was used frequently when installing drawer slides and adjusting door hinges.

A couple of notable items:

The LED light located between the trigger and forward/reverse switch is a good idea but it is positioned so that the chuck casts a shadow on the drill point rendering the light useless.

The high/low switch is located on the top of the drill. It is in a convenient location but I found the sliding switch a little stiffer than it should be. Maybe it will loosen with use.

I found this drill to be a good value and the two year guarantee on the batteries an added bonus.
Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com




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Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days



22 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112080 posts in 2229 days


#1 posted 02-06-2010 07:39 PM

Thanks for the review

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View chewbuddy13's profile

chewbuddy13

150 posts in 1937 days


#2 posted 02-06-2010 07:46 PM

I have this same drill and also really like it. It is very light compared to my last DeWault 14.4 drill. Very handy at getting into tight spaces.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1726 days


#3 posted 02-06-2010 07:51 PM

I have a collection of five 18 volt Dewalt cordless tools and 4 batteries that I can use in any of them. However, every one of these tools is heavy when they have a battery in them. I wanted a light weight cordless drill and I choose the same Hitachi that you reviewed above. I agree completely with everything you say, including the comment about the speed changer being hard to slide.

However, I made my decision based more on how the drill felt in my hand than the features. This drill is light and well balanced and it just feels right in my hand. It is also surprisingly powerful.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Wolffarmer's profile

Wolffarmer

393 posts in 1890 days


#4 posted 02-06-2010 09:56 PM

Ditto on every thing. A real nice little drill, enough power for me, 2 batteries and yes the two speed slide is stiff. won’t move by itself. I got it last spring at Home D for about 75-80 bucks. Over the past few years i have gotten 3 Hitachi power tools and like them all. The first one i got is a 9 inch angle grinder for metal work. That bugger is heavy and it sure takes metal off with the proper disk on it. I also got a orbital sander that I really like. As it is the only one I have ever used all I can say is, It works as I expected it to and no problems with it.

-- That was not wormy wood when I started working on it.

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richgreer

4524 posts in 1726 days


#5 posted 02-06-2010 10:21 PM

I honestly believe there would be more Hitachi tools in my shop if they had not started making some of the ugliest tools on the market. I think they are getting away from that ugly, athletic shoe look and that is a good thing. For example, I really liked their sliding miter saw but I just wasn’t going to put something that ugly in my shop.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Kjuly's profile

Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days


#6 posted 02-07-2010 01:46 AM

Rich,
You are right, it does have that athletic shoe look,I laughed when I read that. After a short time in the shop and it will be unrecognizable.
Thanks for posting.
Keith
Wolffarmer,
Good point, I did not consider that is should be that way to prevent me from bumping it out of gear.
Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com

View Steve's profile

Steve

15 posts in 1733 days


#7 posted 02-07-2010 03:12 PM

Getting a bit off topic, but I have to post about the “spaceship”. That is what we have named out Hitachi 12” sliding mitre saw. As Kjuly said, after a bit, it tends to blend in. I like the athetic shoe comparison though. “Looks” aside though, they make a great saw. I may have to give the cardless drills a shot too. Thanks for the review.

View Enthalpy's profile

Enthalpy

44 posts in 1693 days


#8 posted 02-07-2010 03:23 PM

Bravo Richgreer….their exterior design is a real turn off for me. Kinda like air-jordans with a battery.

View Kjuly's profile

Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days


#9 posted 02-09-2010 04:15 AM

If my air-jordans had a super jumbo battery, then I might be able to touch the rim without a ladder.

Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com

View glassyeyes's profile

glassyeyes

136 posts in 1981 days


#10 posted 02-09-2010 07:24 PM

I’ve got a Ryobi lithium 18v drill and driver set; like it. Got a Panasonic 15.6v drill; love it. Got the Hitachi 12v—and they are my go-to tools. Light weight, strong, good touch on the trigger, good life on the battery. Can’t imagine living without them. I wonder about anybody with large hands liking them as much, though; they’re rather small.

-- Now, where did I put those bandaids?

View PocketHole69's profile

PocketHole69

79 posts in 1689 days


#11 posted 09-15-2010 08:17 PM

Thanks for the review- This one is on sale at Lowes right now for $79.99 and I just picked it up based on your review- I can’t wait to get home and drill and drive the crap out of something.

-- Jason, Atlanta, GA

View Kjuly's profile

Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days


#12 posted 09-15-2010 09:25 PM

Hi Jason,
They say…when you are a drill, everything needs a hole. Or something like that.
$79.99 Wow, I think I could use a second one.
Drill the crap out of everything and let us know what you think.
Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com

View glassyeyes's profile

glassyeyes

136 posts in 1981 days


#13 posted 09-19-2010 07:24 AM

I’ve got the impact driver and the hex-bit drill driver in th series. They’re not meant to drive 1/2” by 13” lag bolts through wet wood. They may not someone with very large hands. But for other tasks with a more ordinary scope of materials, I get a great deal of use out of them. They fit my smaller had quite well. They appear robust, the variable speed is smooth enough. Tha smaller dimensions make it easier touse in confined spaces. The LED light is aimed at a somewhat iseful spot, but doesn’t provide full coverage of all you would wish. The batteries are Lithium—both light and powerful, with good shelf life after charging. I couldn’t fing the standard drill configuration when – bought the set; I’m eager to try it out. It’s either that, or get the right-angle drill head for thr Ridgid JOBMAX.

-- Now, where did I put those bandaids?

View noknot's profile

noknot

548 posts in 2093 days


#14 posted 09-20-2010 01:34 AM

pockethole loves this thing and I grew fond of it also nice weight and plenty of power Glasseye I agree I have ape man like hands but this dril fits nice as opposed to my milwalkee

-- GO DAWGS!

View Kjuly's profile

Kjuly

302 posts in 1937 days


#15 posted 09-20-2010 04:50 PM

Glassyeyes,
Man, that’s a lot of power. I own a corded drill that will not drive a 1/2” x 13” lag.
Keith

-- Keith, Charlotte, MI www.julyswoodworks.com

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