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Deck demolition tool

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Review by LesB posted 11-01-2018 04:45 PM 1081 views 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Deck demolition tool Deck demolition tool No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I recently decided to replace my 1200 square foot, 22 year old, cedar deck with low maintenance composition decking so I searched for a tool to remove the old deck. I found several tools of similar design but I chose this particular tool because of the nail pulling cleats on the end of each pry lever. The tool straddles the deck joists (up to 3.5” wide) and the 44 inch handle makes prying the deck boards almost effortless. If you have ever tried to extract 3” galvanized nails from pressure treated wood you will understand how much work it can be. The nail cleats made extracting the occasional nail that pulled through the soft cedar a snap. Hooking the nail with one of the cleats and pulling sideways popped them right out. Because I wanted to save as much of the old cedar as possible for other projects like planter boxes I worked up and down the boards at each nail point to loosening them a little at a time and being able to do this standing up was a great asset and really saved my back and knees.
I can see using this tool in other applications like lifting heavy objects such as doors during installation, leveling cabinets, and for other demolition projects.

-- Les B, Oregon




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LesB

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7 comments so far

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Mainiac Matt

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#1 posted 11-02-2018 03:06 PM

Looks like quite the beast…

I like it.

-- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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Tennessee

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#2 posted 11-04-2018 01:21 PM

I love this tool. Wish I had one of these years ago when I had a 12X24 foot deck that I rebuilt! Any chance of it breaking where the working part meets the handle? It looks pretty secure. Is that welded around or just crimped?

Do you mind telling us how much that cost? Looks like a great back-saver! Not a back-breaker.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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LesB

1924 posts in 3684 days


#3 posted 11-04-2018 05:24 PM

The tool is welded and so far shows no sign of weakness. You can’t see the weld in the picture because there is a strip of metal wrapped around the weld to make a smooth rocker action during the levering process.I guess there is always a chance of breaking. The price was in the neighborhood of $70.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Dubbs

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#4 posted 11-05-2018 05:47 AM

I need one of those for taking apart pallets! Where’d you buy it ?

-- —— Bruce Hicks ——-

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LesB

1924 posts in 3684 days


#5 posted 11-05-2018 05:29 PM



I need one of those for taking apart pallets! Where’d you buy it ?

- Dubbs


Check Amazon, they have it.

-- Les B, Oregon

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LesB

1924 posts in 3684 days


#6 posted 12-02-2018 06:33 PM

Well, after prying up about 1000 lineal feet of 2X6 cedar deck from pressure treated fir framing the tool developed a crack in the weld holding the pry tongs to the handle. For about 1/3 of that cedar deck material I only lifted the board enough to get a saws all blade in to cut off the nails. The nails were sticking so firmly in the pressure treated wood that they pulled right through the soft cedar damaging the boards. I wanted to reuse the boards so cutting the nails was the best way to keep them undamaged.

I sent a a message to the manufacturer about the damage and I’m awaiting their response. The break appears to be repairable but I’m disappointed it broke so soon.

If you look at the picture you will see that there is a piece of flat metal wrapped around the joint there the tongs are joined to the handle. It is only welded to the handle and serves as a fulcrum for the levering action. I think if it was also welded to the pry tongs as one piece the breakage would be prevented.
If I don’t get some satisfaction from the manufacturer (you know how that usually goes now days). I will have a welding shop make the repair and continue on.

-- Les B, Oregon

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LesB

1924 posts in 3684 days


#7 posted 12-18-2018 10:02 PM

I called the manufacturer and they quickly sent me a replacement All they asked for was pictures of the damage to the old tool. The replacement has the same weld which I doubt is any stronger than the one that broke. I probably won’t test is soon because my deck is done. I’m going to give the broken one to a neighbor who knows a welder who can repair it for him.

-- Les B, Oregon

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