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took lots of abuse, then died, amazon replaced

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Review by steffen707 posted 10-02-2018 01:45 AM 1952 views 0 times favorited 41 comments Add to Favorites Watch
took lots of abuse, then died, amazon replaced No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I wish i could review multiple products in one review, but i’ll post several.

I bought a dewalt dw735x off Amazon for $499, plus the stand for $141 more, both shipped with prime.

I’ve never used a planer before and had a huge pile of old rough sawn pine and oak. I don’t have a jointer, so i was feeding the boards in and might have been cuped, warped, twisted, ect.

I would plane one side, then the other and alternate back and forth. I installed a Wixey WR510 off amazon for $47 shipped. Two weeks later the WR510 is $63…..

I was paying attention to the gauge and only tried planing the appropriate amount for the width of the board based on the planers depth of cut gauge.

That being said, i think the lack of having a flat side from a jointer, I think the dewalt was struggling to roll the boards through and often I had to assist the boards coming through. I also had the planer hooked up to my clearview dust deputy cyclone, BUT to stop it from blowing chips all over when it got full, i also had it hooked up to the shop vac, But with the shopvac off. I think by doing this i created backpressure that made it harder for the planer discharge van to shoot the chips out. I had read that the planer was often too powerful for a shopvac hooked up to the cyclone, so that’s why i didn’t turn it on, but i think it made it worse.

So after making hundreds of passes and filling up my 5 gallon bucket many many times, it stopped pulling a board through, and started making a hellacious noise, i shut it off, and then smoke started pouring out from a vent hold above the motor.

I took the top off, the motor was EXTREMELY hot. unplugged it, and set it outside, came back a few hours later and it was still EXTREMELY hot. Motor was toast. Not sure if it was lack of jointed boards, taking too much material off per pass, or the cyclone setup with shopvac. I contacted Amazon, and they sent me a new one in 2-3 days.

With the second one I took a friends advice and only turned the handle 1/2 turn per pass, which is 1/32” for 6” or 12” boards. Probably took a lot longer, but i made 120 gallons of planer fluff and no issues with the planer. I also turned the shopvac on downline of the cyclone. Seemed to work better.

I’m not sure what to think. Was the motor burn up my fault? Maybe…..but i figured these things should be designed to take abuse…...i’ll stick to the 1/2 turn and hopefully have a jointer in my near future.

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.




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steffen707

149 posts in 2493 days



41 comments so far

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Craftsman on the lake

2832 posts in 3637 days


#1 posted 10-02-2018 02:03 AM

I have the 734 so a bit different but I turn mine about a 1/2 turn. If the wood has an uneven top to it then I start out turning it about a 1/4 turn. If you don’t have a jointer and the bottom is twisted or warped, well you won’t flatten it using the planer this way and a slight turn down could cause it much distress. My guess is that you might have stressed it. The breaker in the motor should have stopped it before it heated up to much though.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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TheFridge

10718 posts in 1686 days


#2 posted 10-02-2018 02:28 AM

Your fault

No. It’s not designed to take abuse. Quite the opposite.

DC might had contributed.

I turn mine 1/4-3/8

It if sounds like the motor is working too hard then it is.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View playingwithmywood's profile

playingwithmywood

432 posts in 1797 days


#3 posted 10-02-2018 04:04 AM

yea seems like a duty cycle issue I wonder is Dewalt has a Duty cycle listed for this machine

I have one and it has been great but I have treated it gentle

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3663 posts in 2188 days


#4 posted 10-02-2018 10:54 AM

+1 about over working it. It is a good planer but probably not for they way you used it. Nice that Amazon replaced it.

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

489 posts in 3394 days


#5 posted 10-02-2018 12:49 PM

100% your fault. Amazon ate that one.

View woodmiser404's profile

woodmiser404

4 posts in 1746 days


#6 posted 10-02-2018 01:19 PM

Definitely your fault. I’ve had my planer for years and have never cut deeper then a 32nd. In fact, I made a plastic wheel that only takes off about a 64th and that reduced the snipe to almost nothing. Personally, Amazon was extreme generous in replacing your unit.

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lew

12428 posts in 3955 days


#7 posted 10-02-2018 01:22 PM

half turn MAXIMUM!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View steffen707's profile

steffen707

149 posts in 2493 days


#8 posted 10-02-2018 01:48 PM

Its funny all of you say 1/32 maximum, even though the planer itself shows a depth gauge of 1/8” for 3” boards, 3/32 for 6” boards, 1/16” for 9” boards and 1/32 for 13” boards. I stayed under those limits. I guess it does say MAXIMUM. Oh well. Thanks Amazon/Dewalt!

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

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Mainiac Matt

8553 posts in 2528 days


#9 posted 10-02-2018 02:13 PM

My policy in general is that I should never force a machine.

When the planer wouldn’t feed the boards, it was telling you that something was wrong. Either the cut was too heavy, the feed rollers were gummed up with pitch, the wood was dragging, the knives were dull… whatever the case, don’t force feed machines.

I don’t have the 735, but there are many, many reviews claiming that the knives dull quickly. Dull knives can’t cut clean with little force back on the lumber. The feed rollers can only apply so much force to the board before they slip…. and then when you force feed it, all will go down hill quickly.

WRT the DC issue…. the high flow of air serves not only to evacuate the chips, but also to cool the machine. Shop vacs provide high static presser differential (suck) but low air flow. DCs provide lower static pressure differential, but move a LOT more air.

-- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

View steffen707's profile

steffen707

149 posts in 2493 days


#10 posted 10-02-2018 02:17 PM



My policy in general is that I should never force a machine.

When the planer wouldn t feed the boards, it was telling you that something was wrong. Either the cut was too heavy, the feed rollers were gummed up with pitch, the wood was dragging, the knives were dull… whatever the case, don t force feed machines.

I don t have the 735, but there are many, many reviews claiming that the knives dull quickly. Dull knives can t cut clean with little force back on the lumber. The feed rollers can only apply so much force to the board before they slip…. and then when you force feed it, all will go down hill quickly.

- Mainiac Matt


Thanks for the suggestions Matt. Next time i’ll try to take less material off when its struggling. I’m thinking lack of jointing the boards to begin with was also a big culprit. I was hoping to be able to do this job without needing a jointer, but perhaps that’s just not going to happen.

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

View christherookie's profile

christherookie

107 posts in 3246 days


#11 posted 10-02-2018 02:38 PM

For the number of people who said it was you’re fault, I’m happy….because usually things are MY fault. ;)

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3663 posts in 2188 days


#12 posted 10-02-2018 02:58 PM

Yes, you can take the maximum cuts in t h e manual. But taking max cuts on hundreds of boards is too much. I also think that your bad dust collection was a big factor. But having too much back pressroom limited the air flow which also provides cooling. Your dust collection setup is really strange. I think you would be better off just running a dryer duct or 4” flex hose into a trash can. I ran mine for years that way.

When you run equipment you have to listen to it and watch it. I can tell on my DW735 when the cut depth is too much.

Unfortunately, you killed the machine and I think Amazon is going beyond what they should do.

View HankLP's profile

HankLP

81 posts in 702 days


#13 posted 10-02-2018 03:30 PM

Doesn’t this thing have an overload shutoff and a reset switch (or button)?

View Rich's profile

Rich

3879 posts in 789 days


#14 posted 10-02-2018 04:28 PM

+1 for Matt’s comment on dull knives. First, the 735 knives are embarrassingly cheap and get dull quicker than my old 733 knives by a long shot. With the cutting you did, they were probably dull about a quarter of the way into your job.

I found out quickly how badly dull knives slow down the feed rate. I had made a few dozen very light passes with new knives through some end grain mesquite. Even as I did the last couple of pieces I noticed it was dragging a little. When I started planing the regular boards long grain, it would barely feed them. I had to push the board. This is all over the course of about 20 minutes. I flipped the blades and it fed like a champ. I’ve since upgraded to a shelix and never looked back.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View steffen707's profile

steffen707

149 posts in 2493 days


#15 posted 10-02-2018 04:49 PM



+1 for Matt s comment on dull knives. First, the 735 knives are embarrassingly cheap and get dull quicker than my old 733 knives by a long shot. With the cutting you did, they were probably dull about a quarter of the way into your job.

I found out quickly how badly dull knives slow down the feed rate. I had made a few dozen very light passes with new knives through some end grain mesquite. Even as I did the last couple of pieces I noticed it was dragging a little. When I started planing the regular boards long grain, it would barely feed them. I had to push the board. This is all over the course of about 20 minutes. I flipped the blades and it fed like a champ. I ve since upgraded to a shelix and never looked back.

- Rich


Thanks for the input Rich.

-- If you think it will take a week and cost $100, it will take a month and cost $400.

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