LumberJocks

Wood River #62 Low Angle Jack

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Review by Dimensions posted 07-03-2018 09:48 PM 813 views 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Wood River #62 Low Angle Jack Wood River #62 Low Angle Jack Wood River #62 Low Angle Jack Click the pictures to enlarge them

So i decided to add another Wood River Plane by woodcraft to my collection. This is only my second hand plane purchase, so bear with me on terminology. Overall the plane has a nice weight. It is comfortable in the hand and it really feels like you’re holding onto a nice piece of metal. The Bubinga handles are shaped well and have a beautiful finish! I have a few older planes in my collection, and compared to my older Stanley planes, my wood River feel more substantial to hold. The Stanley i have, (#5) feels much lighter by comparison to either my WR #5 1/2 or the #62. I always make a point to make a few shavings with the tool before sharpening, just to see how well the plane iron cuts from the factory. Obviously it would benefit from some fine tuning but the tool cut well out of the box, although it didn’t produce quite as fine a shaving as id like. The cuts were consistent, just a little too thick for my taste. I feel that these planes are a good value at just the right price point, and i will continue to add WR planes to my collection. At the time of this writing the competitor’s pricing is as follows:

Wood River: $184USD Stanley SH $123USD Lee Nielsen $245USD LV Veritas $245USD

The WR falls in the middle ground and for the money i believe i made a wise choice. I may change that opinion one day if i’m able to add either a LN, or LV plane to my arsenal, but for now, as a moderate hand tool user, the WR is just right for me!

If you’d like to see the product and my genuine, first time reactions to this beautiful tool, check out my unboxing video here…

I labeled this video “unboxing” rather than “review” because i don’t feel that i possess adequate knowledge or experience to give a full, proper, review. Especially when i don’t really have anything to compare it to….

Thanks for taking the time!
https://youtu.be/OTF3k_VnBQk

-- Get better every day!




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Dimensions

47 posts in 520 days



7 comments so far

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Rich

3203 posts in 645 days


#1 posted 07-04-2018 01:47 AM

Were you able to assess the flatness of the sole? I like to take a Sharpie and put a criss-cross pattern on it and then rub it on a piece of 1000 grit sandpaper (with the blade removed) attached to a known flat surface. You can tell by the marks removed whether you have hollows and then decide if you want to work to flatten it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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mdhills

6 posts in 2688 days


#2 posted 07-04-2018 03:29 PM

What will this plane be used for (I was interested to see your earlier woodriver purchase was a 5 1/2)

I use my (LV) LAJ for a few specific roles. I keep the blade flat (no camber) for edge jointing moderate length pieces (and I used to use for shooting). I also have a toothed blade that was outstanding for scrubbing my doug fir workbench and dealing with some of the grain/knots in that. Any idea what other blade series this plane is compatible with? (could you get a LV or LN toothed blade?).

Matt

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Dimensions

47 posts in 520 days


#3 posted 07-04-2018 08:21 PM

Bob, I’m familiar with the technique you’re talking about, but i don’t have any “true flat” surface in my shop to do this. I need to grab a piece of float glass for my sharpening setup.

-- Get better every day!

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Dimensions

47 posts in 520 days


#4 posted 07-04-2018 08:26 PM

Matt, this plane came with suggestions on the packing for other WR blades but I’m not sure about it’s compatibility with irons from other brands. I’ve never seen serrated blades for planes (newb) but it seems they’d be effective for a scrub plane…

-- Get better every day!

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Rich

3203 posts in 645 days


#5 posted 07-04-2018 09:55 PM


Bob, I’m familiar with the technique you’re talking about, but i don’t have any “true flat” surface in my shop to do this. I need to grab a piece of float glass for my sharpening setup.

- Dimensions

My name is Rich. The quote in my signature is attributed to Bob Flexner, a noted finishing expert.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Dimensions

47 posts in 520 days


#6 posted 07-15-2018 09:24 PM

Thanks, glad you enjoyed!

-- Get better every day!

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DBDesigns

85 posts in 53 days


#7 posted 07-17-2018 08:19 PM

Rich,
Good call on checking the flatness of the sole but I like to do it with the iron in the plane and retracted back. That way if there is any flex in the plane body you get a true understanding of how it performs when it is under pressure from the cap. (Yeah I know. I’m a plane nerd!)

Dimensions,
Tablesaw or jointer is a good flat surface. Also, you can use a thick piece of glass. you will need to come up with some flat surface if you want to true your planes. Flat planes equal flat boards. I was lucky enough to be given a granite counter top sink cutout which is “righteous”.

Check out Blood and Gore to learn all there is to know about old school Stanley planes.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

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