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Fuji IS the way to go...

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Review by AlaskaJohn posted 05-17-2018 11:25 AM 1275 views 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Fuji IS the way to go... No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Received my new MM4 and was super impressed with the packaging and instructions. Put it together and quickly became familiar with the set up. By all means, use the 6’ whip! Makes a huge difference. ALso, I loved the accessory cleaning kit. Really helped. I also got the small containers to use and seal various materials….this will be so much nicer than the cup!

Wishing there are more videos on spraying latex/alkyd paint for painting cabinets. It would help to know more about settings/tips/thinners/extenders.

So, don’t do what I did…buy the wrong thing and then have to buy the right thing the second time!

John

-- John, North Carolina




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AlaskaJohn

2 posts in 4113 days



8 comments so far

View Breeze73's profile

Breeze73

76 posts in 707 days


#1 posted 05-18-2018 04:35 AM

I have one too. I really like it. But, as you point out spraying latex is tough. You have to really thin it out with Floetrol. probably like 15%. Just the nature of straying latex with a Turbine. I like spraying Acrylics with it.

-- Breeze

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AlaskaJohn

2 posts in 4113 days


#2 posted 05-18-2018 10:19 AM

Breeze – thanks for the comment and suggestions. Floetrol is an extender…slows the paint drying time. You may want to also thin with water. My buddy and I learned this tip and it works like a charm.

Again, thanks for the comment!

-- John, North Carolina

View kocgolf's profile

kocgolf

322 posts in 2204 days


#3 posted 05-18-2018 12:24 PM

Does anyone know the difference/advantages of a gravity fed versus “bottom cup” design? I see both styles for the Fuji sprayer and I don’t know much about them. I do think I will want one in the near future, and if I am going to do it, I want to do it right. If I’m spending this amount of money I want the best bang for the buck. I’d likely be spraying a fair amount of latex, too.

View Breeze73's profile

Breeze73

76 posts in 707 days


#4 posted 05-18-2018 07:27 PM

True that Floetrol is an extender, but it does help to thin out the paint as well. Maybe I could use a little less Floetrol and use some water to aid in the thinning. Definitely cheaper that way. I will say, spraying General Finishes “Chalk Paints” (which are really just acrylic paints AFAIK) shoot very nicely.

WRT to the bottom cup question, it just comes down to what you will be doing. If you need a smaller gun to get into a cabinet, then a small cup up top is what you will want to use. But if you are spraying out in the open on a big project, a large bottom feeding cup is what will you will want. The Fuji XPC gun is a great gun in that you can use either cup depending on your application. They mount to the side of the gun and is great for the times when you have to shoot the underside of a horizontal surface. Being able to shoot straight up and not have any issues with the cup/product is really nice.

-- Breeze

View playingwithmywood's profile

playingwithmywood

418 posts in 1623 days


#5 posted 05-19-2018 04:35 AM



I have one too. I really like it. But, as you point out spraying latex is tough. You have to really thin it out with Floetrol. probably like 15%. Just the nature of straying latex with a Turbine. I like spraying Acrylics with it.

- Breeze73

what needle are you using I use the 2mm #6 no problem with just a little distilled water no more than 10%

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Breeze73

76 posts in 707 days


#6 posted 05-19-2018 11:02 AM

That may be the problem them. I was using a 1.8mm. I’ll have to pick up a 2mm and give that a shot.

-- Breeze

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

801 posts in 1610 days


#7 posted 05-20-2018 01:13 PM



... If you need a smaller gun to get into a cabinet, then a small cup up top is what you will want to use. But if you are spraying out in the open on a big project, a large bottom feeding cup is what will you will want. The Fuji XPC gun is a great gun in that you can use either cup depending on your application. ...
- Breeze73

Thanks to all for writing about these guns. I’m new to these things, and have not made a purchase. I have wanted to figure out how they work first, and thus I am asking a question here to try to reduce my own confusion (which is a challenge at times):

When you say a “bottom feeding cup”, does that mean a cup that is hanging under the gun? Is the setup in AlaskaJohn’s opening review photo thus showing a “bottom feeding cup”?

I am asking because I previously had in one that the coating material was taken from the bottom of every cup whether it was standing on top of the gun, or hanging under it.

.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View PaulRFL's profile

PaulRFL

1 post in 29 days


#8 posted 05-23-2018 05:13 PM

So I just bought at Fuji Mini-Mite 4 T-70 system which is the “bottom cup” design mentioned above. I am now looking for all kinds of projects to do around my home. I am new to spraying, but based on the reviews on line, I bought this unit. It is quieter than I expected, based on what I read on line. Spraying with the Fuji is forgiving, and I learned within five minutes proper settings of the gun for the material I was spraying.
The Cup is stainless, so in using the material I sprayed which was a xylene based teak gloss finish sealer, the clean up was wiping the remaining material out of the cup with a clean rag, pour the solvent in the cup, shake it around a bit to clean the lid and gaskets, and the spray the solvent until the cup is empty and the spray is clean. One more wipe of the cup with the rag and it was as good as new. Much easier than I thought.

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