LumberJocks

Great replacement for Dremel

  • Advertise with us
Review by reggiek posted 1693 days ago 6098 views 2 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Great replacement for Dremel No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Santa was a bit late this year….but he came through with this Proxxon Rotary Tool. My 1-1/2 year old dremel passed away and even new brushes would not revive it. I did some research on these tools and found that this one was made to be used continuously and had a brushless motor. The dremel had a tendency to get really hot and cut out after any continuous use over 20 minutes or so – so it did not get serious use. I always worried that it would catch on fire or cease working…which it did die and of course this happened after the warranty expired.

The research paid off as I immediately found a good use of this tool by carving some nice decorative patterns into some moulding that I had used for finishing a couple jewelry boxes I have in progress (I should have taken pics of this but had to get them in the mails so they would arrive before the New Year)....I will be trying it out on some small turnings to add a bit of eye candy and will post some pics then.

This tool feels much more solid then the dremel I had…and when I looked at the new dremels in Loews…I found them to feel more like a toy then a tool. This one has an aluminum head and will accept all the burrs and bits that the dremel used. It comes with a couple of diamond bits and some sanding wheels…and 6 collets (1/32” to 1/8”). It has a foot pedal addition that I did not ask for as I already have a Wecheer Woodcarve using this accessory. My present included the flexible shaft and the keyless chuck. There are several great accessories for this sold under the “Micromot” system and they make great additional presents that folks can get for the lucky recipient.

I have several new Saburr Tooth burrs (really great burrs…I plan to review them now that I can use them the way they were made for) and they now go through wood with this tool very quickly for the course versions and very smooth for the fine version. When I used them on the dremel they were not as efficient and caused the dremel slow under the load (and heat up dramatically)...I had resorted to using them on my Wecheer…but it is not as portable as this tool. This tool has a variable speed that is really smooth – it is advertised as “full wave electronics” and has a speed adjustment of 5k to 20k..I used it continuously for over an hour and the tool was only slightly warm – it also did not seem to feel the load like the dremel did…So far I am very satisfied with this tool. It is slightly more expensive then the dremels…but well worth the extra in my opinion. This tool is manufactured in Germany and really reflects the extra craftsmanship.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!




View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1895 days



20 comments so far

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1396 posts in 2089 days


#1 posted 1693 days ago

good review – i always thought the dremel was a bit delicate – at anything above half speed it gets hot and sparks fly! good to know there’s an alternative…if i need one -

which brings me to my main question: what do you use this thing for? i thought i’d use mine and hardly ever do!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112008 posts in 2202 days


#2 posted 1693 days ago

super review thanks

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Karson's profile

Karson

34869 posts in 3025 days


#3 posted 1693 days ago

Thanks for the review. I’ve got the Foredom. But use it very little. Ov course I’ve got a couple of older Dremels.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5347 posts in 2210 days


#4 posted 1693 days ago

I got 2 new dremel 300’s with cases etc this Christmas. why 2 ? Well I have 2 workshops one for woodworking and one for machining.In any case happy new year it’s just gone 12 here in Scotland Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1895 days


#5 posted 1693 days ago

Aaron – I have several uses for my rotary…I use the brass brushes to clean pitch and crud off saw blades…and get rust off of metals, I use it to clean tools and clear off rusted nuts and bolts. I use the buffer on small turnings and to get into small areas on furniture. I use it alot for precision trimming on joints….its great for triming dove tails, box joints…flattening mitres. I use the diamond cutters for cleaning out inlay slots…and for triming the inserts….I have several router type bits for it and use the flush trimmer bit quite alot on small boxes…it has a round over…a chamfer, a channel and a v cutter (great for cleaning up dados)....I use the small sanding wheels for sprucing up curves and edges…..I use the grinding wheels on lots of stuff…to sharpen, shine and to remove burs…..I use the wood bits alot to make decorative lines and shapes in mouldings and trim pieces….needless to say I use mine alot….I keep my rotary on my workbench on a hanger ready to go….I guess its just what you get used to grabbing when you want to do certain things…..there are a lot of different tools that you can use to do the same things…....I usually have two of them – a Wecheer heavy duty one and a dremel portable….but then was down to only one when my dremel was ailing…I was able to still get the stuff done….but with the new rotary I will be back to using it alot really quick.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1740 days


#6 posted 1692 days ago

I have some of the proxxon tool´s and have used them abuot 30 year´s now when I´m making R/c airoplane´s
and I allso have two sets of there socket wrenches (they have been qiet abused) and they continuring work for several aurs whitaut any complain and I now they have severel different sizes of there machine´s and they are from the start of the compani´s history said that only the best for the user and then they just have to pay for it and that is maybee why I´m so happy for my proxxon´s they just work and work for aur´s and if you are awere of there limitation´s they just make the job done withaut any complain at all
proxxon is made in germany. they have an exstreem bunch of extra´s for the machine´s from tiny drillbits to sawblades and so on and they make all the electric machine´s you already now from grinders to tablesaw´s just in microsize so you can all of them on the same table at the same time

Dennis from Denmark

View BigFoot Products Canada's profile

BigFoot Products Canada

620 posts in 2018 days


#7 posted 1692 days ago

Proxxon makes EXCELLENT tools. You won’t be dissapointed for sure.

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1396 posts in 2089 days


#8 posted 1692 days ago

wow im impressed – i cant seem to wield mine with any precision at all!

View John Gray's profile

John Gray

2370 posts in 2510 days


#9 posted 1692 days ago

Thanks for the review!!!!
I’ve never had much luck with Dremel’s having gone thru several 110V models none of which lasted long enough to justify their cost. I will be studying the Proxxon Professional Rotary Tool – Micromot System for purchase when my last Dremel dies.

-- Only the Shadow knows....................

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2518 days


#10 posted 1691 days ago

I bought/went through 3 dremels, they all either blew up or burnt out.

I bought 2 foredoms…...............one of the foot controls died….the other still works.

I also bought a Gesswien high speed grinder (normally used by jewellers)..................and love it. Somewhat different then the dremel or above as the motor id in the handpiece so it doesnt need a flexable shaft, almost like holding a pencil. Quick release chuck, reversable, from 1000 rpm to 65,000 rpm.

Good luck with your new toy

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1740 days


#11 posted 1691 days ago

Roman
I have looked at the picture and it seems to me it´s one of the big one´s proxxon has several smaller
machine that you can use directly with your hand the one you see here is as I remember the one they
developed for the production linie in the big compani´s

Dennis

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2518 days


#12 posted 1691 days ago

I never blew the pic up…............it looks plenty powerful.

I love to carve and am a tad obcessed with carving. Power carving is a must unless your retired.

The handpiece on the Geisswein is about 1,300 buckaroos plus the station…..............ouchy. If they had a model out there, that can run endlessly, for less money and do a better job, I’ld be on it like a cougar onto a crippled chicken.

Cheers

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1396 posts in 2089 days


#13 posted 1691 days ago

what bits do you guys use to do carving?

I imagine it must be a hell of a lot easier with the flex shaft… and that high speed motor out of your hand!

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1895 days


#14 posted 1691 days ago

This unit is the pro version – there is a smaller one called the detail rotary tool. The pro is a bit more heavy duty from the press…and made to run continuously…the biggest difference. The difference in price is about $30. The pro goes around $100 to $110…the detail goes for $79 to $89.

The pro is actually not bad as far as heft and balance. I have the flex shaft…but using the motor with just a bit is not bad….I keep the flex shaft on though as I have mine hung over my bench.

I just used the tool to finish off making a few handles for the new diamond sharpeners I got…(credit card sized). It ripped through the oak I used like it was balsa wood….and made it easy to put finger grips on the handle….I am also making a couple bench holders for a friend that I got started diamond sharpening.

AaronK – I recently switched to Saburr Tooth burrs they are a bit expensive but are fantastic cutters and are easy to clean (they advertise them as non-clogging)...I use the xtra course and course for rough out and getting down to size – the fines for clean up and detail that is not extra fine….I switch to diamond or small carbon cutters for fine detail work)...you have to watch out when buying the burrs to make sure you get the proper grit….all bits come in course to fine grits….yet some “kits” don’t tell you the grit or type of material removal (xtra course, course, fine, super fine)...If you plan on using a rotary tool for power carving…I recommend getting the foot pedal attachment….it is nice to have the option of speeding up/slowing down whithout having to move your hand away from the work. Proxxon’s is inexpensive.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View bill4123's profile

bill4123

24 posts in 1213 days


#15 posted 826 days ago

I ruined 5 110v Dremels within a 3 year period. The one thing I did like was the remanufacturing program where I sent them my burned up tool and received a completely rebuilt (not just repaired) tool for $35 per tool. It was cool at first but then after I realized I was going to keep burning up the things I decided to move on to something more substantial. I almost ended up with the Proxxon and likely will thanks to your review if my other tools ever wear out.

showing 1 through 15 of 20 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase