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Whiteside Router Bit UDFT5152 Flush Trim Up/Down Spiral Bit

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Review by Rich posted 10-29-2017 05:00 AM 2437 views 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Whiteside Router Bit UDFT5152 Flush Trim Up/Down Spiral Bit No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

First, pardon the commercial web site photo. I usually prefer to post my own photos, but in this case, the image from the web site shows it best.

This router bit is such a great performer. I’ve used two-flute flush trim bits for years with mixed success. If you can manage to run with the grain, they work beautifully. Using a combination bit with bearings on the top and bottom helps with that because you can flip the piece with the template attached and adjust the bit height so that you can deal with the grain better. The problem comes when the wood has wild, fluctuating grain. There’s no way to work with the grain when it’s changing every few inches.

That’s where this Whiteside bit shines. The spiral up/down design provides a compression cut, so that the shear for the top and bottom of the board is towards the center, eliminating any fuzzy edges. It also is as sharp as it can be, and the large shear angle allows it to cut down or up the grain with ease. (Even with that, going around a curve and into the grain should be handled with caution).

The shear angle also completely eliminates any washboard effect on the trimmed surface. It’s clean and ready with no need to sand it smooth.

At $110+, this bit is not cheap, but like all Whiteside bits, its quality is as good as it gets, and if you have a need to do lots of trim cuts cleanly, it’s a flawless performer.

My need for it not only involves expensive exotic hardwoods, but the trim step is several steps into the process, so if I have to toss the piece due to tear out, I’m wasting not only money, but time. So far this bit has caused zero defects that required scrapping the piece.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.




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Rich

1889 posts in 406 days



8 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

570 posts in 2165 days


#1 posted 10-29-2017 12:23 PM

Do they make this with the bearings on the bottom? Most of the time when I’m using the router to make multiple pieces the pattern is the sled portion of the jig with the piece being cut clamped on top of the pattern.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View tool49's profile

tool49

7 posts in 567 days


#2 posted 10-29-2017 01:09 PM

No affiliation with Whiteside, but your question prompted my curiosity. Yes they do but in a different format.

https://www.whitesiderouterbits.com/collections/ultimate-flush-trim-bits

Hope this helps.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1651 posts in 1039 days


#3 posted 10-29-2017 02:12 PM

I do a lot of template work and have lusted after these bits, but the cost oy!

I have been using Whiteside’s straight flute top/bottom bearing bits in the manner you mention to keep the grain going “downhill” during the cut. It works excellent, but there still is some minor sanding and occasional burning.

You may have convinced me to pry open my wallet 8^)

View Rich's profile

Rich

1889 posts in 406 days


#4 posted 10-29-2017 02:26 PM


No affiliation with Whiteside, but your question prompted my curiosity. Yes they do but in a different format.

https://www.whitesiderouterbits.com/collections/ultimate-flush-trim-bits

Hope this helps.

- tool49

There’s a review for that bit here. I’m sure the larger cut diameter helps, but I struggled with the cost of this one, and spending another $55 was too much. Also the 1-1/2” cut length on this one will make it useful in more situations for me.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1699 posts in 2830 days


#5 posted 10-29-2017 04:13 PM

Thanks for the review.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

7401 posts in 2145 days


#6 posted 10-31-2017 01:14 PM

Any time you have the spiral up/down combination, it’s refered to as a compression bit. They are usually used for cutting plywood on CNC routers, where the work piece is securely fixed and the cutting head is firmly controlled.

I’ve never seen one with a guide bearing before. That’s really going to make compression bits much more usable for router tables and hand routers.

Thanks for sharing.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5422 posts in 2630 days


#7 posted 10-31-2017 05:34 PM

I’m sure that is a great bit. For those woodworkers that need a clean cutting spiral bit, but don’t want to spend that much, the RFT2100 1/4-Inch Diameter Spiral Flush Trim Up Cut bit is available. I think I paid about $37 and performance has been flawless. It looks almost identical, it’s just a down shear rather than a compression bit.

https://www.amazon.com/Whiteside-Router-Bits-RFT2100-Diameter/dp/B000HPYOJ6/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1509470966&sr=8-3-fkmr1&keywords=WHITESIDE+ROUTER+BIT+SPIRAL+1%2F4%22+BEARING

Larger diameter spiral bits are available too, but the price jumps significantly. Sometimes the 1/4” diameter can be an advantage because it creates a smaller radius and follows a pattern more closely (I especially notice this on inside corners).

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1651 posts in 1039 days


#8 posted 10-31-2017 06:13 PM

I use milling bits as “cheap” spiral router bits. The high speed steel versions are sharper than carbide (don’t last as long however). They tend to be much cheaper than bits labeled as “router bit” and can be found on sale frequently. Carbide milling bits tend to cost the same as the equivalent router bit.
Typically the shank size matches the diameter, for a 3/8” bit I use a 3/8” adapter in my 1/2” collet.

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