LumberJocks

Amana PR1040C Exceeds All Expectations

  • Advertise with us
Review by GraceAndDrew posted 10-26-2017 03:50 PM 3065 views 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Amana PR1040C Exceeds All Expectations Amana PR1040C Exceeds All Expectations Amana PR1040C Exceeds All Expectations Click the pictures to enlarge them

I have to ask for forgiveness…when I opened the package for my new Amana PR1040C saw blade I took the Lord’s name in vain and said several curse words. To the best of my memory I said something like, “Je$%^ H. Chr#$! Look at this big mo&$r fu#%r!”

You need a little back story for this review. I hate to admit it in public but I use a jobsite table saw. There, I said it. But, with all sorts of jigs and a few Incra products I make it work for me and I usually don’t have any problems. By the way, I use a Delta 6022. And yes, I an insanely jealous of all the great table saws you guys have as well as your expertise.

Since I am running an under-powered saw, I though I should use thin-kerf blades. Therefore, I have a collection of high-quality Freud Industrial thin-kerf models. I change blades constantly to fit the situation which is a productivity killer. I have a Freud thin-kerf combination blade but it has trouble with hard wood…probably my saw and technique rather than the blade. By the way, remember when you were young and thought it was cool to change saw blades? I think back to that time and think “what an idiot!” Changing blades is not cool!

After scorching all sorts of perfectly good wood and constant blade changing, I thought I would give this Amana blade a try. I have never used Amana; all of my blades are red. I was concerned about a full kerf blade and the product info describes it as being “beefy”.

After the initial expletives when I opened the package, I got busy trying it out. This beast seems to act like a fly wheel and spins fast and smooth. Construction lumber is a joke for this blade. It cruises through about as fast as you want to go. Hard Maple, the nemesis of my other blades was no problem either! With a nice smooth feed rate I had no scorch marks and baby smooth edges…no more planing off saw marks! What a time saver. Cross cuts were also excellent. I use an Incra Miter Express so it is basically a zero clearance situation. No tear out.

The only negative is that the kerf is 50% larger than the thin-kerf models. My thin-kerfs are 1/8” and this blade is 3/16”. So, more money turns into saw dust. For me, I think the increase efficiency (not changing blades, glue-ready cuts) makes it worth it.

If you have an under-powered saw like me, don’t hesitate to get this full-kerf beast. I can only imagine how great this blade is with cabinet saws. And, next time I order a great woodworking product, I’ll try to watch my language!

Mark
Grace & Drew Woodworking

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com




View GraceAndDrew's profile

GraceAndDrew

34 posts in 418 days



13 comments so far

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5192 posts in 3443 days


#1 posted 10-26-2017 05:42 PM

Quote: The only negative is that the kerf is 50% larger than the thin-kerf models. My thin-kerfs are 1/8” and this blade is 3/16”. So, more money turns into saw dust. For me, I think the increase efficiency (not changing blades, glue-ready cuts) makes it worth it.

Thin kerf blades are less than 1/8” thick. Full kerf blades are 1/8” not 3/16”.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5798 posts in 3013 days


#2 posted 10-26-2017 06:06 PM

Looks like this one is .134”

That would give my riving knife fits.
I do generally like Amana products, they seem to be high quality.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View GraceAndDrew's profile

GraceAndDrew

34 posts in 418 days


#3 posted 10-26-2017 07:38 PM

Good point! I was just eyeballing with a tape measure. With my calipers I got .135 which is a little bigger than 1/8 but certainly not 3/32. To me, after using thin kerf blades, it looks to be the size of a snow plow.

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com

View cmmyakman's profile

cmmyakman

206 posts in 2856 days


#4 posted 10-27-2017 05:50 PM

“By the way, remember when you were young and thought it was cool to change saw blades? I think back to that time and think “what an idiot!” Changing blades is not cool!”

That made me laugh out loud.

I agree with Pintodeluxe, anything greater than 1/8” will cause issues with the riving knife. Like you, most of my blades are Freud, but I will be on the lookout for other products from Amana.

-- You can't fail if you don't give up.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2892 posts in 2225 days


#5 posted 10-28-2017 01:29 AM

The only time you should have troubles with the riving knife is when the kerf is thinner than the knife. The knife being thinner than the kerf should not be a problem.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View REL's profile

REL

76 posts in 3856 days


#6 posted 10-31-2017 06:26 PM

Aren’t Forest thin kerf blades 3/32”? Their full kelf are 1/8” which means .125. I never heard of a blade .134-.135 thick. I am confused. I prefer full kerf; 1/8”easier math when measuring.

Woodworking = waste and sawdust anyway.

-- REL, North Jersey

View Redsoxfan's profile

Redsoxfan

34 posts in 1826 days


#7 posted 10-31-2017 07:35 PM

I like all things amana. Router Bits, Shaper cutters, Dado Stacks, and saw blades.

-- Brian, Western MA

View Kuryakin's profile

Kuryakin

6 posts in 1113 days


#8 posted 10-31-2017 08:38 PM

I also use a jobsite table saw (Bosch 4000) and have been using Freud thin kerf Fusion blades with good success. But I need a flat tooth blade for cutting smoother rabbets and dados (without a dado set) in drawer ends in a cross cut fashion. I believe the Amana here is an ATB type. Any suggestions?

View Kuryakin's profile

Kuryakin

6 posts in 1113 days


#9 posted 10-31-2017 08:46 PM

After further research, Amana Tool 610504 Combination 10-Inch x 50 Tooth 4ATB+1 Raker 5/8-Inch Bore Saw Blade does have a 5 tooth pattern where the 5th tooth only is flat. I’m just not sure if that is enough for smooth bottomed cuts. Any experience out there with it?

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2125 posts in 3144 days


#10 posted 02-19-2018 06:08 PM

I agree a thinner kerf would cause drag on the splitter/riving knife, but a wider kerf pulling back together could put pressure on the back of the blade (slight pinching), the starting point for disasters, no?


The only time you should have troubles with the riving knife is when the kerf is thinner than the knife. The knife being thinner than the kerf should not be a problem.

- runswithscissors


View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2892 posts in 2225 days


#11 posted 02-19-2018 10:55 PM

When I first installed my RK on my Unisaw, I started to rip a rough-cut plank of oak, only to have the wood clamp up tight on the knife. It was so tight that it couldn’t be forced. That was with a thin kerf blade, however. But the difference in thickness is so small (1/32”) that I think it highly unlikely that a kickback would occur. The tighter the board gripping the knife, the less likely the kickback, I think. But you would probably get scoring on one or both board edges.

Grizzly seems to supply their saws with only one knife, and I assume that must be a thin knife. I have looked at them in the showroom, and they all do look thinner than a full kerf. I see nothing in their catalog that even mentions optional knife thicknesses. I asked the show room guys (who have worked there for decades) about it, and they couldn’t answer the question.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2125 posts in 3144 days


#12 posted 02-19-2018 11:49 PM

“They” do say the right side of your knife should be dead on with the right side of your blade. That must fit in here somewhere.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2892 posts in 2225 days


#13 posted 02-20-2018 12:39 AM

I agree, at least for right tilt saws. Not sure about left tilt. I adjust mine to the right side, which is also the side toward the fence. Probably true for most.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com