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View MrRon's profile

How safe is Sawstop?

by MrRon
posted 08-17-2017 05:27 PM


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174 replies

174 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7687 posts in 2057 days


#1 posted 08-17-2017 05:40 PM

Either way, it’s still safer than a normal table saw. I don’t own one, but I wish I did.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View gargey's profile

gargey

917 posts in 682 days


#2 posted 08-17-2017 05:44 PM

It’s 83.725% safe, compared to 71.11375% safe for a Unisaw, and 98.1435% safe for a handsaw.

Routers are only 64.11355725% safe.

View doubleG469's profile

doubleG469

438 posts in 351 days


#3 posted 08-17-2017 05:46 PM

always that one guy….

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1121 posts in 1902 days


#4 posted 08-17-2017 05:57 PM

It’s reliable enough that most people on the Internet are worried about false positives/inadvertent trips.

The circuit itself probably has been tested to one failure in 10,000 or 100,000 , which would be 99.9999 or 99.99999% reliable. I don’t know this for a fact, but that is typical for things like airbags and explosion prevention systems which use similar curcuitry.

My thoughts are that Gass did not sell out over this fear. The saw has been on the market a long time now, and cut hundreds of thousands of hot dogs. If it didn’t work, the haters would have made sure we know about it. The sale to Festool parent was probably about cashing in, free capital to grow the business, and access to international markets.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4421 posts in 3649 days


#5 posted 08-17-2017 06:22 PM

Like Brians point at the end…
If there were videos of hotdogs getting cut in half, at a woodcraft or woodworking show, it would be all over the internet/youtube… showing the ‘1 time it failed’ to be trumpeted by everyone that didn’t like Gass, to say SEE SEE SEE!!!! it is crap and doesn’t work!!

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1265 posts in 1131 days


#6 posted 08-17-2017 06:26 PM

I doubt he sold in fear of a lawsuit. He would not be able to even go to market if he did not have some sort of liability insurance. I’m sure it’s very expensive but he would be covered. He’s an attorney, he would have made sure his bases are covered.

I seriously considered a Sawstop but my needs were better met with a format table saw. It has it’s own safety features in that the hands go nowhere near the blade and you are off to the side of the blade in event of kickback.

I have my reservations about his methods of trying to get a law passed and that does turn me off, but in the end, it is a safer product. It’s like dust collection. There’s a cost vs safety ratio that everyone has to consider for themselves.

View Dwain's profile

Dwain

509 posts in 3766 days


#7 posted 08-17-2017 06:36 PM

Listen. It works. The safety in a SawStop is there. That has been proven. ALSO the saw is of fantastic quality. It is an excellent unit. I believe most woodworkers if given the option would replace their own table saw with a SawStop. I can’t afford one, and I don’t believe I will ever spend what it costs to buy one. I am happy with the cabinet saw I have; so I just pay more attention when I use it. I don’t have that safety net. Ideally, you would have the safest saw and be as safe a woodworker as possible. How important is it to you? Again, it’s out there and it works. IF you want the safest table saw, get a SawStop. If you want to be a SAFE woodworker, a SawStop isn’t needed, but it helps.

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

View doubleG469's profile

doubleG469

438 posts in 351 days


#8 posted 08-17-2017 06:41 PM

Oh and as for costs as I inadvertently posted in another forum that I thought was about table saws…


As of today, i will only buy a sawstop.

Massive jagged fracture, 15 stitches (Not enough meat for the rest), so I d say price the sawstop. Imho

- doubleG469

The ER bill will be more than the table saw guaranteed. So take it for what it’s worth. IMHO

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3912 posts in 2216 days


#9 posted 08-17-2017 06:44 PM



always that one guy….

- doubleG469

Always that one guy without a sense of humor and has a need to chastise other for their sense. Just saying.

A good sense of humor is a sign of psychological health.

https://qz.com/768622/a-good-sense-of-humor-is-a-sign-of-psychological-health/

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View TaySC's profile

TaySC

270 posts in 240 days


#10 posted 08-17-2017 07:13 PM

My personal thoughts are that some people with sawstop will start to become more careless relying too much on the saw to not cut them, rather than using common sense.

We all know that sawstop works and is a solid product.

What we don’t need, however, is for people to start becoming careless.

Remember, just because gun safeties work doesn’t mean we point a loaded gun at someone with the safety on and pull the trigger.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4881 posts in 2400 days


#11 posted 08-17-2017 07:43 PM

Someone above mentioned…you can bet that when a SS fails the news will spread like wildfire through forums and other social media. I’m sure there’s a chance, but it’s extremely small. One other thing, I always wondered about the “shelf life” of the cartridges…apparently there is none; good to the day they are tripped. I know a fellow on another forum tripped his. It was the original in the saw; purchased in 2006.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View dmo0430's profile

dmo0430

61 posts in 909 days


#12 posted 08-17-2017 08:01 PM

I read a post about someone who turned the sensor off for a cut. Didn’t turn it on and next time he was in the shop made a couple of mistakes and lost a bunch of fingers. I’m sure the tech is pretty good or like people have said someone would have pointed it out. You can’t count on the human aspect of the “tech” though and we’ll still make mistakes like thinking the safety is on when it isn’t. (Just to add to Tay’s point)

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3912 posts in 2216 days


#13 posted 08-17-2017 08:12 PM


I read a post about someone who turned the sensor off for a cut. Didn t turn it on and next time he was in the shop made a couple of mistakes and lost a bunch of fingers. I m sure the tech is pretty good or like people have said someone would have pointed it out. You can t count on the human aspect of the “tech” though and we ll still make mistakes like thinking the safety is on when it isn t. (Just to add to Tay s point)

- dmo0430

As safe as the operator.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View richimage's profile

richimage

39 posts in 1637 days


#14 posted 08-17-2017 08:49 PM

DMO0430, as I read your post, something jangled my (limited) memory, so I checked, and SawStop says:
“When you have completed your cut, push the Start/Stop paddle in to turn off the motor. The safety system
will remain in Bypass Mode until the blade comes to a complete stop. Once the blade has stopped, the
safety system returns to normal Standby Mode. The next time you start the motor, the safety system will be
active unless you repeat the procedure described above to start the motor in Bypass Mode.” I recall that because I had the same question in my mind about using the bypass…

richimage

-- "Women are like modern paintings. You can't enjoy them if you try to understand them." Farrokh Bulsara (Freddie Mercury)

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4881 posts in 2400 days


#15 posted 08-17-2017 08:51 PM

Yep, the accident as described isn’t possible unless there was a major malfunction with the saw. It (the safety system) resets after it’s switched off.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View HarveyM's profile

HarveyM

99 posts in 1929 days


#16 posted 08-17-2017 11:18 PM

I spend more time worrying that my airbag will fail.

-- Just a Duffer

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

126 posts in 1151 days


#17 posted 08-18-2017 03:42 AM

I am a SS owner/user and former salesman for a local business that was dealer at the time. I am very fortunate that my boss gave me one when I retired because it saved my left index finger. I have also performed the hot dog test quite a few times in trade shows. Guys, it works! Period!
As far as becoming careless I find it actually serves as reminder to be more careful but, yes I still made a mistake.
And I assure you the scenario described by TaySC is not possible.

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

126 posts in 1151 days


#18 posted 08-18-2017 03:42 AM

I am a SS owner/user and former salesman for a local business that was dealer at the time. I am very fortunate that my boss gave me one when I retired because it saved my left index finger. I have also performed the hot dog test quite a few times in trade shows. Guys, it works! Period!
As far as becoming careless I find it actually serves as reminder to be more careful but, yes I still made a mistake.
And I assure you the scenario described by TaySC is not possible.

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

126 posts in 1151 days


#19 posted 08-18-2017 03:45 AM

Dang! how do I delete that second post?

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2655 posts in 1932 days


#20 posted 08-18-2017 03:46 AM

SawStop technology will not prevent kickback, which is probably encountered more often than run-ins with the blade. That’s what a riving knife is for. And yes, I’m aware that SS has a riving knife.

Without faulting the safety of Sawstop, I still say I like the Bosch technology (Reax) better. If you can simply drop the blade below the table, why slam it into an aluminum block to stop it, likely damaging the blade, and (I can’t help wondering), maybe other components too, such as arbor or bearings?

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3912 posts in 2216 days


#21 posted 08-18-2017 03:56 AM

I’m not against anyone buying SawStop. I’m not against anyone not buying SawStop. It’s you decision, your money. I didn’t care for Grass’s tactics.

How safe is SawStop? I don’t know. I have read/heard many times that anything electronic will fail sooner or later.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1265 posts in 1131 days


#22 posted 08-18-2017 04:19 AM



SawStop technology will not prevent kickback, which is probably encountered more often than run-ins with the blade. That s what a riving knife is for. And yes, I m aware that SS has a riving knife.

- runswithscissors

You are correct but kickback is one of the leading ways that a hand gets sucked into the blade so, besides the riving knife, it does have added protection for kickback.

View Bohaiboy's profile

Bohaiboy

76 posts in 1701 days


#23 posted 08-18-2017 04:23 AM

I have a SS cabinet saw. Luckily I haven’t experienced an incident with flesh. However, I was cutting a tricky angle with a tenoning jig and wasn’t paying attention on setup. The blade touched the jig (dado insert and blades) and disappeared abruptly as soon as the metal made contact with the blade. I could not see even a paint chip on the tenoning jig. The brake slammed up and the inertia retracted the blade before I knew what happened. $89 for a new aluminum brake, blade was salvageable. Fingers, I still have 10. If a high quality saw sells for the same price as other high quality saws, and throws in tis safety feature, why not buy it. As someone mentioned earlier, your ER bill will be far more expensive than the saw, not to mention the embarrassment of having to explain that your circumvented safety because you thought it was a gimmick. Why risk it. If the saw were an inferior saw, well maybe a case. But this saw is fantastic and will work one to one with any saw out there.

-- Tim, Houston, TX area

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6355 posts in 2106 days


#24 posted 08-18-2017 04:37 AM

If a high quality saw sells for the same price as other high quality saws, and throws in tis safety feature, why not buy it.

Absolutely… unfortunately, there isn’t one on the market at this time.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View playingwithmywood's profile

playingwithmywood

379 posts in 1504 days


#25 posted 08-18-2017 05:14 AM

I hate their business practices and how they sued to keep other manufactures out of the market place with similar technology

I also will never own a Apple product for how the run their business and how they have negatively effected the technology sector and Apple fighting against #RightToRepair

I try to avoid Evil Companies but it is getting harder and harder to do at this country is in failure mode

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

894 posts in 2494 days


#26 posted 08-18-2017 06:22 AM

It is safe. I own a Unisaw use the guard, riving knife and push sticks. Would I buy a Sawstop yes but I doubt I will because I love my Unisaw and disliked the Sawstop pcs 1.75 that the school had were I taught. The 3hp would have been better but the Unisaw has features I like. The front controls on a Unisaw are great and the 5hp motor cuts anything without bogging down.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

11121 posts in 2287 days


#27 posted 08-18-2017 06:40 AM

I find it’s simpler and cheaper to follow the rules of tablesaw operation and not have to worry about paying extra to save me from my own stupidity.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3076 posts in 1895 days


#28 posted 08-18-2017 11:07 AM

It is amazing that this same topic with the same responses comes up about once a month. The same people have the same things to say.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2741 posts in 3344 days


#29 posted 08-18-2017 11:52 AM



Someone above mentioned…you can bet that when a SS fails the news will spread like wildfire through forums and other social media. I m sure there s a chance, but it s extremely small. One other thing, I always wondered about the “shelf life” of the cartridges…apparently there is none; good to the day they are tripped. I know a fellow on another forum tripped his. It was the original in the saw; purchased in 2006.

- Fred Hargis

Each time you turn the main switch on it does a system check of the mechanism for that session and verifies it’s viable. Little blinking light stops and that’s your cue to go ahead and start it up.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View edapp's profile

edapp

64 posts in 1336 days


#30 posted 08-18-2017 12:11 PM

One point about the kickback/riving knife. Before I got my sawstop i never used the riving knife in my old Hitachi. I didnt use it because it was a pain in the neck to install, align, and remove. When i needed to remove it the first time, it never went back in. And yes, I have had a kickback on that saw.

The sawstop on the other hand, and some of the other modern cabinet saws, has a simple, easy lever to install and remove the riving knife. Also the table insert is easy to remove and reinstall with no fasteners (my old saw needed a screwdriver). These simple, non electronic things make my operation of the sawstop safer, and encourage the use of safety features.

Similarly the fact that you can use the saw in bybass mode, but have to turn the key every time you turn the saw on (cannot “leave it” in bypass mode) is a safety feature i like. Again encouraging safe habits.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 498 days


#31 posted 08-18-2017 12:32 PM

You will find that most people who do not have it tell you how bad it is and how a Unisaw is better. People who do not own Mercedes will tell you that their Honda does everything a Mercedes can and some more. A frog in a puddle will croak you that it is better than a lake…

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1494 posts in 2974 days


#32 posted 08-18-2017 01:27 PM

I did not read all the replies, so if I duplicate sorry. I do own one, and would not want to cut without it. In an early article on the sawstop the inventor shopped it around to all the big guys on the block, and story goes, they did not buy for that very reason. However he did not give up and built one heck of a TS around it. They regret not taking the offer now.

As to will it work, lt will. Worst case its just a TS and would be no worse than without. It will work. Great investment. Had mine a good amount of time now and love it.

Cheers.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Markmh1's profile

Markmh1

67 posts in 350 days


#33 posted 08-18-2017 01:53 PM

I own a Sawstop PCS. I look at the safety feature as I would the safety on a firearm, that is, no replacement for proper handling.

My wife, doctor, and insurance guy are all happy I have a Sawstop. I really don’t think about the safety feature. When I bought the saw, I thought the safety feature was a gimmick. I bought the saw for the saw’s construction. It is a nice saw.

As far as growing complacent because the safety feature will protect me, the thing I think about most is, it’s about a $150 excursion to trip the brake. I don’t need that expense, or the delay to get a new cartridge and blade.

When I use the saw, the second thing I’m thinking is how nice it is and why did I wait so long to buy one.

Mark

View doubleG469's profile

doubleG469

438 posts in 351 days


#34 posted 08-18-2017 02:51 PM

always that one guy…. * :-) * ( for Alaskaguy so he recognizes sarcasm)

- doubleG469
Always that one guy without a sense of humor and has a need to chastise other for their sense. Just saying.

A good sense of humor is a sign of psychological health.

https://qz.com/768622/a-good-sense-of-humor-is-a-sign-of-psychological-health/

- AlaskaGuy

Exactly, look in a mirror. it’s funny but i see you trolling a lot of comments in different forum posts. I guess it’s how you get your jollies.

Edit: maybe I should have put a smiley face behind it so you would understand sarcasm.. :-)

-- Gary, Texas "That’s just my $.02 and I have no personal experience so take it with a grain of salt ;-P, HokieKen"

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1102 posts in 2668 days


#35 posted 08-18-2017 03:12 PM

Apparently SawStop does the job. However, good sense and proper precautions also do the job. I began using a table saw about 1967 and today after 50 years I still have all of my fingers. The use of proper jigs and fixtures to handle unusual cutting situations, well designed push sticks, and the ingrained use of exaggerated hand motions to be sure the hands are clear of the blade at all times have served me well.

On the other hand, if you are a shop beer drinker, an alcoholic, or just generally incompetent, the Saw Stop is for you! : )

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2389 posts in 1752 days


#36 posted 08-18-2017 03:17 PM



Apparently SawStop does the job. However, good sense and proper precautions also do the job. I began using a table saw about 1967 and today after 50 years I still have all of my fingers. The use of proper jigs and fixtures to handle unusual cutting situations, well designed push sticks, and the ingrained use of exaggerated hand motions to be sure the hands are clear of the blade at all times have served me well.

On the other hand, if you are a shop beer drinker, an alcoholic, or just generally incompetent, the Saw Stop is for you! : )

- Planeman40


...or don’t have 50 years experience and only get to spent 10 hours at most in the shop per week, or need your fingers for you day job with a keyboard.

You guys remind me of life long smokers that haven’t gotten cancer yet.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1102 posts in 2668 days


#37 posted 08-18-2017 03:42 PM

I didn’t start out with “50 years of experience” and I am a home type woodworker. But I was very careful to train myself in shop safety in the beginning and I use good sense and care when working. And I do value my fingers as I use them all day and every day. Accidents most often happen when someone is trying to make a cut without proper jigs or fixtures or “just getting this one cut” without using a proper way of holding the work.

I am not against a Saw Stop. But most of us home-type woodworkers can’t throw that kind of money into a table saw. But safety can be achieved without a Saw Stop by good sense and good practice. To me Saw Stop makes sense for schools and manufacturing businesses where the users are all types. And if you have the cash, by all means, buy one!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2389 posts in 1752 days


#38 posted 08-18-2017 03:46 PM



I didn t start out with “50 years of experience” and I am a home type woodworker. But I was very careful to train myself in shop safety in the beginning and I use good sense and care when working. And I do value my fingers as I use them all day and every day. Accidents most often happen when someone is trying to make a cut without proper jigs or fixtures or “just getting this one cut” without using a proper way of holding the work.

I am not against a Saw Stop. But most of us home-type woodworkers can t throw that kind of money into a table saw. But safety can be achieved without a Saw Stop by good sense and good practice. To me Saw Stop makes sense for schools and manufacturing businesses where the users are all types. And if you have the cash, by all means, buy one!

- Planeman40


Thanks, I did.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

11121 posts in 2287 days


#39 posted 08-18-2017 03:59 PM



...or don t have 50 years experience and only get to spent 10 hours at most in the shop per week, or need your fingers for you day job with a keyboard.

You guys remind me of life long smokers that haven t gotten cancer yet.

- RobS888

Using a saw safely is a choice, not experience. But there are people who want the safety feature and I have nothing against it. Just don’t pretend like it’s necessary and we all should have it.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1102 posts in 2668 days


#40 posted 08-18-2017 04:04 PM

Lets leave Rob alone. He is just trying to justify his spending $3,000 on a table saw. Its only natural. : )

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6550 posts in 3275 days


#41 posted 08-18-2017 06:25 PM

Any technology, mechanical/electronic can fail!
What is MTBF, mean time between failure, of the technology employed may provide some insight as to how safe it is!

I have to agree runswithscissors that the Bosch Reax is just as effective and cheaper when it becomes time to “reboot” the Table Saw.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2389 posts in 1752 days


#42 posted 08-18-2017 06:33 PM


...or don t have 50 years experience and only get to spent 10 hours at most in the shop per week, or need your fingers for you day job with a keyboard.

You guys remind me of life long smokers that haven t gotten cancer yet.

- RobS888

Using a saw safely is a choice, not experience. But there are people who want the safety feature and I have nothing against it. Just don t pretend like it s necessary and we all should have it.

- Rick M


He touted his experience as a factor in not needing one.

Who said you should have one? Who said it was necessary? Are you sure you are answering the proper thread?

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2389 posts in 1752 days


#43 posted 08-18-2017 06:34 PM



Lets leave Rob alone. He is just trying to justify his spending $3,000 on a table saw. Its only natural. : )

- Planeman40


If only you knew what you were talking about. It is a great saw and was only $1,800.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4633 posts in 3150 days


#44 posted 08-18-2017 07:04 PM

Any time the word Sawstop is mentioned, regardless of the context, the pro and con followers have at it. To bring up another related topic; instruction manuals! How many people actually read the instruction manual of any tool before using it? I would venture a guess that maybe 70% give it a casual glance then go directly to use the tool. I’m sure many accidents have happened because the user failed to read the manual and may have been prevented had the user read the manual first. For example; every manual starts out with a list of cautions, dangers, do’s and dont’s. It is boring reading and most think they already know the dangers involved and skip over it. This creates in the user’s mind a state of false composure, a recipe for a possible accident. I personally have been guilty of such a state when a seemingly safe tool like a sander turned around and bit me. Damage was not great, but it reminded me to be more vigilant.

View clin's profile

clin

798 posts in 903 days


#45 posted 08-18-2017 08:31 PM

There are ways to design equipment so that errors will tend to cause false triggers rather than NOT triggering when it should. I strongly suspect they have designed it this way.

Of course, nothing is ever perfect, so I’m sure there is some possibility, and perhaps it has actually happened. But I doubt it is high enough to even consider it a factor in a purchasing decision.

As a SawStop owner, even if the brake were only going to be effective 90% of the time, I like those odd way better than the 0% of the time other saws provide. And I’m sure the reliability is 99.9+%.

Keep in mind there is some type of electronics, probably a microprocessor that performs systems checks every time the saw is turned on. So it has some ability to detect problems before the blade even turns.

And of course, there are others dangers besides putting your finger into the blade to be concerned with, so a SawStop isn’t going to ensure you never hurt yourself. But ti does make it really hard to cut off your fingers.

-- Clin

View brtech's profile

brtech

1019 posts in 2829 days


#46 posted 08-18-2017 08:50 PM

My next door neighbor, who I generally think of as an extremely competent and careful mechanic/technician, just showed me his bandaged hand and hopes today’s surgery will save his four fingers. He was cutting a small piece of ply and did something stupid.

We’re all humans, and we all make mistakes. You can’t declare you will always be safe. No human can do that. You can improve your odds, but the reality of the number of table saw incidents is a really big issue. It tells us that it’s pretty darn easy to make mistakes around table saws.

I don’t know about you, but I make plenty of mistakes even when I’m trying really hard not to. Mistakes around table saws tend to be unforgiving – both the “can’t make a board bigger with another cut” and the “cut your finger off” ones. The large number of incidents makes “improving the odds” a difficult to win calculation. .0001×10000 is 1

My wife, who knows me pretty well, happened to be with me on a trip to the local Rockler and I was drooling over the SawStop. When I told her what it did, she insisted I buy it. Who was I to argue? But the point is that she knows, as everyone knows, that careless mistakes happen to us all. So, please don’t tell me that you decided that you won’t make mistakes around your TS. You can insist you will ALWAYS operate it safely. I claim you can’t do that. No human can.

I am VERY careful around my SS. I treat it as if the safety feature wasn’t there. I’ve never tripped it. I plan to never trip it. I try really hard to be safe. But I’m not at all willing to trust that I will actually always be safe.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

11121 posts in 2287 days


#47 posted 08-18-2017 09:13 PM



...or don t have 50 years experience and only get to spent 10 hours at most in the shop per week, or need your fingers for you day job with a keyboard.

You guys remind me of life long smokers that haven t gotten cancer yet.

- RobS888

Using a saw safely is a choice, not experience. But there are people who want the safety feature and I have nothing against it. Just don t pretend like it s necessary and we all should have it.

- Rick M

He touted his experience as a factor in not needing one.

Who said you should have one? Who said it was necessary? Are you sure you are answering the proper thread?

- RobS888


You also brought up experience as a reason for having one. And then compared it to cancer as if injury were an inevitable consequence. I disagree with both those opinions. But you did not say we should all have one, my mistake for bringing it up. But I recently read an article in non woodworking magazine that flesh sending tech should be made law on all table saws so I guess it was on my mind.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TaySC's profile

TaySC

270 posts in 240 days


#48 posted 08-18-2017 09:18 PM

Personally I have nothing against sawstop and don’t really get the defensive mentality of some of its owners. I think it’s great that technology is advancing to make us safer in our daily lives. What I don’t really get is why some people have to make out like it’s their job to defend SS at every turn.

If others prefer another brand, then who cares?

You don’t hear people get all up in arms arguing because woodworker 1 bought a powermatic and woodworker 2 bought a grizzly…..

Just curious, for those that are casual woodworkers / hobbyist, which model of the SS do you own? Some of the contractor saws are fairly reasonable in price. The professional series is where they seem to get pretty crazy, but I’m also sure that has to do with what you re getting. The contractor series all seem to have a 1.75 HP motor. Is that large enough for everything that you guys do or do a lot of you have the professional series SS’s?

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DS

2855 posts in 2327 days


#49 posted 08-18-2017 09:25 PM

I know people who refuse to wear seat belts in their car because 5% of the time it causes worse injuries.
Of course, they conveniently ignore the 95% of times that it minimizes, or prevents injury altogether.

For me, I will take the better odds.

I’ve used a Sawstop. Don’t currently have access to one.
If I were in the market, I would definitely buy one.

Even taking care, accidents will happen.
How well you are prepared by proper use of your saw will have a very large influence on the outcome of the accident.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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robscastle

4787 posts in 2111 days


#50 posted 08-18-2017 09:35 PM

My thoughts are without any objective background knowledge the TTS company has Robert Bosch in there somewhere.

Whats next Airbags on saws and even then there is a risk of secondary injury involved.

Saws no matter what type are designed to cut, in fact any turning device will cut, just check out the youtube videos.

In fact a scroll saw will sever a finger, it might take you a little longer time but I am sure somebody (fool) has done it!

The seat belt is a good example, you cannot show off a massive bruise in person dead.

-- Regards Robert

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