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View Huds's profile

Changing the angle of already angled piece

by Huds
posted 08-14-2017 07:21 PM


6 replies so far

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5089 posts in 3392 days


#1 posted 08-14-2017 07:27 PM

A jig on a table saw is the way to go. It will take many trial cuts on scrap to get the 15° angle needed.

View Huds's profile

Huds

24 posts in 1755 days


#2 posted 08-14-2017 07:29 PM

Thank you sir. Would you envision essentially a custom taper cut jig tailored for this? I’ll probably make 3 clocks, maybe more over time, seems like it would be worth it to come up with something very specific to this job.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3796 days


#3 posted 08-14-2017 09:36 PM

Disk sanders excel at fudging angles. The
table saw jig is a good idea too. You’ll
find it very challenging to cut all your
parts so they fit together in a 360 degree
form. In order to avoid gaps I would glue
each half up and true the edge on a flat
surface with coarse sandpaper taped
to it, a “sanding board”. This can be done
on the disk sander as well if the sander is
large enough.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

398 posts in 768 days


#4 posted 08-14-2017 09:40 PM

If you cut your wedges at 14 degrees, you won’t need to cut the originals.
Perhaps if you glue your wedge material to the original and then cut the assembly to 30 degrees you’ll compensate for any variations in the originals. Should be relatively easy to set up a taper jig for 30 degrees. Fewer cuts means less error compounding.

Just a thought.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Huds's profile

Huds

24 posts in 1755 days


#5 posted 08-14-2017 09:41 PM

Ah, doing one half at a time is a great idea, hadn’t thought of that. I have used my table saw as a flat surface for a sanding board, granite top, it’s a good flat reference surface. I could potentially do 1/4 of it at a time, and work to a 90-degree angle, that way I spread any variance out over more joints than just 2 where it could potentially be more noticeable. Hopefully I can get it close enough to where doing one half at a time will work. Thanks!

View Huds's profile

Huds

24 posts in 1755 days


#6 posted 08-14-2017 09:42 PM



If you cut your wedges at 14 degrees, you won t need to cut the originals.
Perhaps if you glue your wedge material to the original and then cut the assembly to 30 degrees you ll compensate for any variations in the originals. Should be relatively easy to set up a taper jig for 30 degrees. Fewer cuts means less error compounding.

Just a thought.

- LittleShaver

Ah, more great ideas, thanks. I hadn’t thought about the different angle wedges, or trying to put a pin and a wedge together first and work from those as a unit. Thanks very much!

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