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View CharlesA's profile

Help with lathe live center, chuck, etc.

by CharlesA
posted 08-12-2017 10:01 PM


18 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7004 posts in 2371 days


#1 posted 08-12-2017 11:37 PM

That is a spur center on the spindle… and I believe (but not 100% sure) that it’s threaded on. Hard to tell from the picture. Does the hole in the pulley go all the way through? If so, it may be a taper fit and needs to be banged out with a knockout rod.

IIRC, those machines were sold under several different names. I’d hunt for a manual – maybe an older HF lathe is the same?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1414 posts in 1902 days


#2 posted 08-13-2017 02:39 AM

Charles, you are showing in the circle a spindle and spur. It’s threaded onto the spindle. The picture also shows a wrench flat which tells me there is another at 180 degrees. Problem is, can’t tell whether the wrench flat is on the spur or the spindle. If it’s on the spindle, just get a wrench that fits the flats, and a wrench to fit the spur. It will come off by holding the spindle from turning, and pulling on the wrench you have on the spur. Might take a bit of creative holding, but it should come off…........ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#3 posted 08-13-2017 02:40 AM

Thanks, ,Brad. I meant to write spur center. That hole in the pulley looked so small I thought it couldn’t operate that way. Guess I’ll try both ways.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#4 posted 08-13-2017 02:42 AM

Thanks,Jerry. I’ll give it a try.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2448 posts in 2307 days


#5 posted 08-13-2017 04:38 PM

Those lathes came with wrenches to remove the drive center, put one on spindle and other on drive center. Unless I am wrong cannot remove the live center in the tailstock. That style lathe did come with diferent size spindles and threads, so just measure to see what you actually have. Just from looking at your picture spindle looks like is 1” x 8 TPI which makes buying a chuck or additional faceplates little easier. The spindle is solid on those lathes so don’t worry about Morse tapers.

Good luck with it.

-- Bill

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#6 posted 08-13-2017 05:04 PM

Thanks everyone. Yes, 3/4” on flats, 7/8” on spur and it’s off. Does look like a 1” x 8 tpi.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#7 posted 08-13-2017 05:52 PM

so, the cheap way to expand any use of my lathe would be a faceplate, right? The more expensive being a 4 jaw chuck?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

610 posts in 1474 days


#8 posted 08-13-2017 06:23 PM



Yes, 3/4” on flats, 7/8” on spur and it s off. Does look like a 1” x 8 tpi.

I’m confused (not something new). 3/4” on the flats on the spindle and 7/8” on the spur?
If the exterior of the spur is 7/8” then the spindle can’t be 1”.
One which I started with had a 3/4” X 16 tpi spindle.

Faceplate or chuck is up to you but a chuck is more versatile.
Faceplate probably about $20 or chuck about $100.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#9 posted 08-13-2017 06:27 PM

As you should be. 3/4”.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7004 posts in 2371 days


#10 posted 08-13-2017 07:12 PM

so, the cheap way to expand any use of my lathe would be a faceplate, right?

Cheapest (and far more versatile) would be to get a thread tap... but you gotta make sure what your spindle thread is first :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2448 posts in 2307 days


#11 posted 08-13-2017 07:40 PM

If remember right can find either 1” x 8 TPI or 3/4” x 16 TPI on that lathe if you are measuring the drive center at 7/8” of an inch have my doubts about spindle being 1” x 8 TPI. They were sold by many different companies.

Very iImportant for you to count the number of threads per inch using a sharp pencil and ruler to make sure what the thread count actually is before buing faceplates or chucks.

If having trouble figuring it out take lathe to a local Machine shop and ask if they can use their threads per inch gauge. You can also buy a gauge bu might only have a one time use.

If get it wrong will end up buying a spindle adapter to get accessories to fit.

-- Bill

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#12 posted 08-13-2017 08:21 PM

I’ll go back and count the threads again, but it sure looks to me like a 3/4×8 (I’m sure of the 3/4”—measured with caliper). That’s not a very popular size.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7004 posts in 2371 days


#13 posted 08-13-2017 08:37 PM

According to several owners accounts I’ve been able to find, that lathe is similar or the same as the older Harbor Freight 14×40 lathe (although some also had an outboard sanding disc). Buffalo Tool company was just an importer, and the Buffalo brand was a trademark of the TAB Merchandise Corp (now defunct), so it’s very possible they were identical with just different colors. Those had a 3/4” X 10tpi spindle.

That is the same spindle size as on my old Delta… which I used (and still do) without the need of a chuck or faceplate and turned some really nice stuff. If you have a reasonably complete tap and die set, you might already have the tap for it. My old Craftsman set had one, which saved me the $10 or so to buy one :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#14 posted 08-13-2017 08:44 PM

Thanks, Brad. You’re probably right about the threading. I knew it wasn’t 16, but I haven’t gone back out to the shop to confirm. I don’t necessarily need a faceplate or chuck, I was just thinking through what I might need someday. I’m not going to be a big bowl or vase guy, but I should probably turn at least one bowl just to say I did it!

If it is 3/4×10, that will make my decision making a bit easier since there aren’t lots of faceplates and chucks made with that threading!

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#15 posted 08-13-2017 08:59 PM

Here you go. 3/4” diameter, about 3/4” in length. Looks to me like 5 threads in the 1/2” section.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7004 posts in 2371 days


#16 posted 08-13-2017 09:03 PM

If it is 3/4×10, that will make my decision making a bit easier since there aren’t lots of faceplates and chucks made with that threading!

Yeah, that was one of my reasons for not getting a chuck for mine. Although, PennState does sell a spindle adapter that will convert it to a more standard 1×8. Unfortunately, it places the chuck out further from the headstock bearings, which isn’t really ideal. I believe some insert type chucks have an adapter, which would be better. But honestly, making my own wooden faceplates/glue blocks, mandrels, jam chucks, etc… worked great. I’ve turned everything from small diameter wheels and rotors to fairly large bowls (limited to the lathe swing) with them. Click on the linkey thing in my post above (or just click here) for examples :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

610 posts in 1474 days


#17 posted 08-13-2017 11:31 PM

I wasn’t sure this guy was still around but it appears he is.,
He list a 3/4X10 faceplate for $8 but could probably make a 3” as well. It is not relieved but it appears that your spindle does not need a relief.
http://cc.bingj.com/cache.aspx?q=lathe+faceplate+3%2f4+x+10+tpi&d=4664770005566164&mkt=en-US&setlang=en-US&w=7wgCtEpOaRFJSqDDaRT8YgK9_8YV3K3z

If you decide to go with a chuck, and if that chuck is a Nova, you will need insert “H”.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3342 posts in 1970 days


#18 posted 08-30-2017 05:49 PM

BTW, I was wrong. The spur was 15/16”, not 7/8” not sure how I made that mistake.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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