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Wood Identification...again

by Chris Cook
posted 08-11-2017 12:59 AM


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76 replies

76 replies so far

View jbay's profile

jbay

2487 posts in 980 days


#1 posted 08-11-2017 01:02 AM

Looks like Poplar to me.
Poplar doesn’t have to have the green streaks, I’ve seen a lot without it.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1577 posts in 1878 days


#2 posted 08-11-2017 01:19 AM

It kinda looks like something that’s been treated or heated to alter its color .
Very ugly to me.
I’m not playing on this one.

-- Aj

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1361 posts in 1304 days


#3 posted 08-11-2017 01:24 AM

Looks like poplar to me

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#4 posted 08-11-2017 01:44 AM



It kinda looks like something that s been treated or heated to alter its color .
Very ugly to me.
I m not playing on this one.

- Aj2

Well, I resawed this straight from a raw board. No crazy treatment here. Probably just the photo catches the light strange.

I guess we’re at poplar here.

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

8652 posts in 2923 days


#5 posted 08-11-2017 01:56 AM

Wondering if it has the same mass? eg. pine and walnut share similar pattern and stringiness. But then the walnut produces fine dust and the pine does not. Sooo is there similar density, weight and such to the poplar on hand?

Where did the wood come from, how did you acquire it?

I have walnut that does not look like walnut should. LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2705 posts in 1729 days


#6 posted 08-11-2017 02:09 AM

My vote would be Hickory, we have Hickory flooring, here is a picture of Hickory with finish on it

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View bobkberg's profile

bobkberg

439 posts in 3154 days


#7 posted 08-11-2017 05:36 AM

My first thought was poplar just looking at the grain. Color-wise poplar ranges from almost white to a dark greenish black. Given what Jerry just posted though, I’d be inclined to agree with him, since the grain patterns are similar, but the color of his floor is closer to your original photo.

Regards,
Bob

-- Bob www.singularengineering.com - A sideline, not how I earn a living

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

896 posts in 3163 days


#8 posted 08-11-2017 09:31 AM

Looks like Poplar to me.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 728 days


#9 posted 08-11-2017 10:43 AM

Perhaps check here ...
 

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2202 posts in 1303 days


#10 posted 08-11-2017 02:43 PM

First guess would be poplar. Jerry’s suggestion for hickory could be correct, hickory is very heavy though.

Ambrosia maple is also possible.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 728 days


#11 posted 08-11-2017 02:59 PM


Ambrosia maple is also possible.
- splintergroup

Definitely not Ambrosia maple!
 

 

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

590 posts in 1701 days


#12 posted 08-11-2017 03:39 PM

How hard is it? Poplar is a pretty soft wood and I bet you could dent it slightly with your fingernail.

My first thought was unsteamed walnut, but that would be much harder and heavier. I vote Poplar for now. Can you weigh and accurately measure one of the boards?

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#13 posted 08-11-2017 04:02 PM

Thanks for all y our responses.
Thank you Ron, but I am not going to buy a book when I have all these smart folks here.
There is a great lumber supplier in Kennesaw, Ga (Peachstate lumber) and I get their scrap barrel every now and then. 3 to 4 foot pieces of all types of wood. This was in there.

Here’s another look at it (top boards only):

It is very pale in color and even this picture doesn’t show it that well.
It is a light weight wood.

I am leaning towards Poplar or maybe Aspen? Is it aspen or Ash that fuzzes up? This definitely doesn’t fuzz up.

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1522 posts in 1295 days


#14 posted 08-11-2017 04:52 PM

Popular – not all poplar has greenish character.

-- Desert_Woodworker

View DS's profile

DS

2966 posts in 2501 days


#15 posted 08-11-2017 05:06 PM

just looking…

no comment

(Munches a handful of popcorn)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View DS's profile

DS

2966 posts in 2501 days


#16 posted 08-11-2017 05:07 PM

And yes, Aspen fuzzies up a lot.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 856 days


#17 posted 08-11-2017 05:56 PM

Looks like Magnolia to me. Where are you located?

http://www.wood-database.com/southern-magnolia/

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#18 posted 08-11-2017 06:34 PM

Magnolia! Hmmmm… it does have that look. I am in Georgia, the wood comes from all over though. Had Bubinga in the same batch.

Somebody tell me this; if it is poplar and I finish it with tung or danish oil, will it go green at any point? Or does that only happen when you see some green start with?

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1522 posts in 1295 days


#19 posted 08-11-2017 07:50 PM

This may of some help to you-
Here is a link to a 2012 Fine Woodworking article on staining Poplar. At the end of the article it described on how remove the “green” before you stain it.
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/american-woodworker-blog/make-poplar-look-pretty

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 728 days


#20 posted 08-11-2017 08:00 PM

Looking at the hobbithouseinc.com wood database ... it just might be magnolia … hmmm! What’s the chance of an end-grain photo?

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

590 posts in 1701 days


#21 posted 08-11-2017 08:16 PM

New pictures are definitely NOT unsteamed walnut, which I mentioned before. I think Poplar if it is a common wood.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

917 posts in 2063 days


#22 posted 08-11-2017 08:29 PM



Magnolia! Hmmmm… it does have that look. I am in Georgia, the wood comes from all over though. Had Bubinga in the same batch.

Somebody tell me this; if it is poplar and I finish it with tung or danish oil, will it go green at any point? Or does that only happen when you see some green start with?

- Chris Cook

The green will actually turn a nice brown if you put it out in the sun for a few hours. You can always sand down and it will be green again too, if you wanted anyway.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#23 posted 08-11-2017 08:37 PM

LOL! this thread goes on and on. It’s not all that important, but I am enjoying it anyway and appreciate the comments:

Here are end-grain and edge photos:

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1522 posts in 1295 days


#24 posted 08-11-2017 11:24 PM

I thank you for posting this-
For me, I refreshed my experience with Poplar, matured from other LJ species forums, learned how to remove the green….

Also, while doing some research, on how to identify wood species. I came across this YTube- vid, which is quite interesting, especially when it comes to, examining the end grain, with a ….
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xl8ambb7kL8&t=222s&ab_channel=WoodFloorBusiness

Finally, unscientifically, I believe that if I were to cut some sample pieces; the aroma or smell, would trigger a reaction; for example, cut pine, smell pine; cut oak, smell oak… If you are used to poplar; you will remember the smell.

-- Desert_Woodworker

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9852 posts in 1566 days


#25 posted 08-11-2017 11:32 PM

I’m sure it’s alder…

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1522 posts in 1295 days


#26 posted 08-11-2017 11:54 PM



I m sure it s alder…

- TheFridge


I was sure that you would be here- and I would have bet that you would say what you said :)

-- Desert_Woodworker

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TheFridge

9852 posts in 1566 days


#27 posted 08-12-2017 12:08 AM

I am the all seeing god of wood. Unfortunately, all the wood I see is alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#28 posted 08-12-2017 12:26 AM

I do have another board in my shop that I KNOW is poplar. I’ve compared them with no confidence.

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#29 posted 08-12-2017 12:30 AM

closer look. This poplar board has green in it. Not from the same original batch

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

364 posts in 965 days


#30 posted 08-12-2017 12:55 AM

Looks like Willow—light tan to brown, light weight, streaks of brown and tan.

Now that I see the edge of the boards, I’ll change that guess to sycamore. The chatoyance in the edge grain is a dead give away.

Haven’t seen or used Willow since I was in high school shop class where it was a favorite secondary wood for cabinets. That’s been over 40 years.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#31 posted 08-12-2017 12:59 AM



Looks like Willow—light tan to brown, light weight, streaks of brown and tan.

- sawdustdad

We may have a winner here. Looking at the weight and images of willow, this does match up. The magnolia matches well too!

I guess I should just finish a piece with tung oil and see what it looks like.

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View jbay's profile

jbay

2487 posts in 980 days


#32 posted 08-12-2017 01:50 AM

I’m sticking with Poplar.
I’ve seen way too much of it.
(although the side grain is throwing me off a little)

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

896 posts in 3163 days


#33 posted 08-12-2017 10:36 AM


I m sticking with Poplar.
I ve seen way too much of it.
(although the side grain is throwing me off a little)

- jbay


Me too…...all photo’s look like poplar EXCEPT the edge/Qsawn one.
Better end grain pic’s would help…..clean cut, finely sanded, close up.


I do have another board in my shop that I KNOW is poplar. I ve compared them with no confidence.
- Chris Cook

Looking at the side by side photo’s of the known poplar vs. mystery wood…the mystery wood still looks like Poplar to me.
What in particular leads you to think it isn’t? (there are a LOT of subtleties you can see personally that we can’t see on our monitors)

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#34 posted 08-12-2017 01:19 PM


What in particular leads you to think it isn t? (there are a LOT of subtleties you can see personally that we can t see on our monitors)

- Tony_S

Don’t misunderstand me, I was willing to believe poplar, but there have been many conflicting opinions here. I sanded it next to the “known poplar” and it does powder up exactly the same.

One thing is for sure, matching wood samples to database pictures is as subjective as anything.

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2202 posts in 1303 days


#35 posted 08-12-2017 02:05 PM

IDing wood through pictures is truly a pain.
When all else fails, you can always narrow the search by measuring the density and getting a clear, well sanded end grain to compare with wood database tables/images.

Poplar is a real bugger since the grain/color can vary so much. I’m working with some “mild” Ambrosia maple that looks very much like your first picture (reason why I mentioned it). Of course the more common species is probably the correct answer 8^)

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1522 posts in 1295 days


#36 posted 08-12-2017 04:02 PM

Here are two methods to determine density of wood, that can be done in a workshop-
http://www.idahoforests.org/img/pdf/lessons/density.pdf
http://sciencing.com/measure-wood-density-7767463.html

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2019 posts in 2719 days


#37 posted 08-12-2017 04:13 PM

Bass?

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#38 posted 08-12-2017 05:36 PM



Bass?

- Ocelot

LOL! I’m not laughing at you, I’m laughing because you could be right! Bass, just like 7 other woods, that looks just like this! Has about the same density too!

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9852 posts in 1566 days


#39 posted 08-12-2017 06:28 PM

The qtr sawn edges showing the tiny rays looks consistent with poplar I’ve used.

But still. It’s probably alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#40 posted 08-12-2017 08:03 PM



The qtr sawn edges showing the tiny rays looks consistent with poplar I ve used.

But still. It s probably alder.

- TheFridge

LOL!

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4265 posts in 2390 days


#41 posted 08-13-2017 12:52 AM


Here are two methods to determine density of wood, that can be done in a workshop-
http://www.idahoforests.org/img/pdf/lessons/density.pdf
http://sciencing.com/measure-wood-density-7767463.html

- Desert_Woodworker


Which one do you like to use?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1522 posts in 1295 days


#42 posted 08-13-2017 12:58 AM

Both will achieve the answer- What about you, how do you determine “density”?

-- Desert_Woodworker

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9852 posts in 1566 days


#43 posted 08-13-2017 01:15 AM

Take a block plane to the endgrain. Need a good slicing action. Sanding it to 1000+ will work too.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

323 posts in 2361 days


#44 posted 08-13-2017 03:25 AM



Take a block plane to the endgrain. Need a good slicing action. Sanding it to 1000+ will work too.

- TheFridge

All I have is some 8 grit paper I use for roughing corners.

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9852 posts in 1566 days


#45 posted 08-13-2017 05:42 AM

Use a block plane or razor knife even though it’ll probably just prove it’s alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4265 posts in 2390 days


#46 posted 08-13-2017 05:57 AM



Both will achieve the answer- What about you, how do you determine “density”?

- Desert_Woodworker

I don’t, I don’t get that anal.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9852 posts in 1566 days


#47 posted 08-13-2017 06:03 AM

Yeah I try to avoid it but DW makes me pitch sometimes :)

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1522 posts in 1295 days


#48 posted 08-13-2017 05:16 PM

AGuy- You don’t have to get that anal. Try learning some history of density, here I will help.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMNwXUCXLdk&ab_channel=TylerDeWitt

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1522 posts in 1295 days


#49 posted 08-13-2017 05:21 PM

Fridge pitches but beware of his “curve ball” :)

-- Desert_Woodworker

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4265 posts in 2390 days


#50 posted 08-13-2017 07:35 PM



AGuy- You don t have to get that anal. Try learning some history of density, here I will help.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMNwXUCXLdk&ab_channel=TylerDeWitt

- Desert_Woodworker


If I want to know the the density of a particular specie wood I can look it up (this is the information age after all). Or, I can pick up a piece of wood and feel the weight and dig my finger nail in to and pretty tell if it is what I want to use in a project. Not being anal that’s all I need.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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