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laminate on furniture questions

by plasma800
posted 08-09-2017 03:14 PM


16 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

267 posts in 527 days


#1 posted 08-09-2017 05:40 PM

I have never done anything like this but…
Faced with this and the fact that you’re using sheet goods, I’d consider applying the Formica to the sheet goods as the first step. Then cut your pieces and joints. To assemble, use an epoxy glue to hold it all together.

I Hope someone with experience chimes in.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9970 posts in 3555 days


#2 posted 08-09-2017 06:19 PM

If you use rabbets and dados, you should
be able to apply the laminate after and
trim flush using a bearing-guided trim
bit. Be sure to account for laminate thickness
when sizing the rabbets and dados.

You could consider Mod-Eez fasteners. They
can be used for butt joinery and are totally
concealed when assembled. http://www.mod-eez.com

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

261 posts in 1639 days


#3 posted 08-09-2017 06:32 PM

I’m not a pro at this either—that being said—I would rank solid wood as the last choice for a substrate—I think the others would be “flatter” and less susceptible to dimensional change based on humidity fluctuations.

I would try to wait until all the joinery and glue-up was completed before applying laminate (assuming that the shape of laminate pieces is square or rectangular). This is where the design would be important to know. I don’t know what those pieces of laminate would have to look like in order to fit or if there would be issues placing/gluing/trimming them after everything is glued up.

Perhaps applying laminate first and using loose tenons or some other type of “knock-down” fasteners (e.g. connector bolts/cap nuts) is the best strategy.

FWIW: I’ve applied laminate to only one side of some projects and so far (knock on wood) have not had warping issues because of it.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2053 posts in 807 days


#4 posted 08-09-2017 07:10 PM

I would use shop grade maple or birch plywood for the substrate.

Laminate all your interiors first, cut your rabbets or dado’s and screw everything together from the out side.
After everything is built cover the exterior.
Cover the sides first, then the face, then top last.
If the back has to be laminated, cover it first, then the sides, face and top.

If you post a picture of what your doing we will be able to help better.
I’m just assuming seeing that I have no idea of your design.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 266 days


#5 posted 08-09-2017 08:31 PM



If you use rabbets and dados, you should
be able to apply the laminate after and
trim flush using a bearing-guided trim
bit. Be sure to account for laminate thickness
when sizing the rabbets and dados.

You could consider Mod-Eez fasteners. They
can be used for butt joinery and are totally
concealed when assembled. http://www.mod-eez.com

- Loren

I had considered this, even though it complicates the build a little and I wasn’t exactly going for the lines of a rabbet at the corners, however, with full overlay doors and drawers, they would be hidden anyway.

I’ve located a company here in town that sells TFL Panels, HPL panels in like.. a gazzillion different colors and textures. I’m considering buying the panels with the laminate already on them, then cut and assemble.. that might produce a much better result.. also this opens up a whole world of possibilities in modern furniture design for a small shop.

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 266 days


#6 posted 08-09-2017 08:35 PM

It’s a really straight forward design… but the devil is in the details..

and likely I’ll go full 32mm on this thing, that will change the dimensions a little, but that’s ok.

the back would just be 1/2 or 1/4 ply

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 266 days


#7 posted 08-09-2017 08:38 PM

oops post

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 266 days


#8 posted 08-09-2017 08:42 PM

And Hittech makes these super cool VB connectors.. I might give them a try in a project like this or two..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQJHY9sTo8E

This video is boring as can be, but these guys look solid and don’t look bad after installation. I’m still really concerned with racking though on such a long carcass.

View jimbrown's profile

jimbrown

20 posts in 203 days


#9 posted 08-09-2017 09:19 PM

I’d use “pre-laminated” panels, you’ll live longer and you can control the joints.

-- JimBrown

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9970 posts in 3555 days


#10 posted 08-09-2017 10:03 PM

As long as the back is securely installed
I don’t think it is likely to rack with KD
connectors, especially with that divider
and (I’m guessing) fixed shelf. Of course
the joints on thing like IKEA pieces fail
because the material is low grade, tears
out, and the cases just have the backs
affixed with a few screws.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

388 posts in 867 days


#11 posted 08-09-2017 10:19 PM

Why not laminate the interior pieces and screw together and laminate the outside..

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 266 days


#12 posted 08-10-2017 01:51 AM


Why not laminate the interior pieces and screw together and laminate the outside..

- JackDuren

I have no issue doing this, just trying to think through the details.

When you say screw together.. are you talking pocket screws… straight through butt screws… ?

Where’d you find those legs? I really like those.

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 266 days


#13 posted 08-10-2017 01:53 AM


As long as the back is securely installed
I don t think it is likely to rack with KD
connectors, especially with that divider
and (I m guessing) fixed shelf. Of course
the joints on thing like IKEA pieces fail
because the material is low grade, tears
out, and the cases just have the backs
affixed with a few screws.

- Loren

I could, as stated, laminate the interior side, assemble with KD or rastex from the outside, the laminate the outsides.

This is where i get stuck.. there’s 50 ways to peel this onion …

Further, I’d like to make this repeatable. I live in an area where I think I could sell a few of these with a few options of color choices. And laminate makes so much sense for a dining room serving table.

I’ve been toying with the idea of changing the design to have a full length pull out tray just under to the top, and above the drawers for extra serving space. I know in our own dining area, we’d use it a lot to set out food for serving.

So the idea of tea jugs sweating on it, hot plates, hot pans.. laminate makes so much sense.

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 266 days


#14 posted 08-10-2017 03:02 AM


Why not laminate the interior pieces and screw together and laminate the outside..

- JackDuren

How are the corners on this case done? It looks like the corners might be mitered? ..

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9970 posts in 3555 days


#15 posted 08-10-2017 03:03 AM

Confirmat screws are awesome for casework.
For what you’re doing the whole case could
be drilled for them in a few minutes using a
construction boring machine, but lacking that
the holes can be carefully be drilled by hand.

https://www.amazon.com/Confirmat-Screw-Two-Piece-Drill-50mm/dp/B003ASBBSE

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 266 days


#16 posted 08-10-2017 03:16 AM

I also consi


Confirmat screws are awesome for casework.
For what you re doing the whole case could
be drilled for them in a few minutes using a
construction boring machine, but lacking that
the holes can be carefully be drilled by hand.

https://www.amazon.com/Confirmat-Screw-Two-Piece-Drill-50mm/dp/B003ASBBSE

- Loren

I also considered particle board and Confirmat screws. I lot of these techniques are new to me.

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