LumberJocks

All Replies on Leaving Batteries on Charger

  • Advertise with us
View DMiller's profile

Leaving Batteries on Charger

by DMiller
posted 08-08-2017 06:46 PM


25 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3818 days


#1 posted 08-08-2017 06:52 PM

I doubt there’s harm in it with lithium
batteries. Modern chargers have circuitry
in them to prevent over-charging.

One of the worst things you can do it
put a hot battery straight from a tool
you’ve been using onto the charger.
That really cooks them.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1149 posts in 1079 days


#2 posted 08-08-2017 07:11 PM

It may depend on the charger/battery combo you’re using. Some of the PC chargers have overcharge protection to prevent the kind of damage that you’re concerned about. Check your models number and do a Google search to get the specifics.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7001 posts in 2369 days


#3 posted 08-08-2017 07:31 PM

Yup. Depends on the charger. One of my Makita chargers has a “T” at the end of the model #, indicating that its got a trickle charge function so you can leave them in after a full charge. The manual for my other one recommends removing the battery after charging. It’s all up to the charger and how smart it is.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2338 posts in 1393 days


#4 posted 08-08-2017 07:50 PM

I place my chargers on an old mechanical type light timer set to only run for 1 hour per day. This keeps the batteries topped up, but prevents any possibility of long-term overcharging. It also saves a small amount of power based on testing.

View Karda's profile

Karda

1303 posts in 724 days


#5 posted 08-08-2017 07:54 PM

I have an 18v drill from HF, the battery takes 3-5 hours to charge, manual says charging for more than 7 hours will damage the battery

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3591 posts in 2159 days


#6 posted 08-08-2017 08:02 PM

I wired up an outlet with an electronic bathroom fan timer and set it for 60 minutes which charges any of my lithium batteries.

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 552 days


#7 posted 08-08-2017 08:02 PM

Just using that HF battery will damage the battery.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5128 posts in 2664 days


#8 posted 08-08-2017 08:06 PM

The newer (quality) chargers have solved the problems associated with leaving them in there. I still use a setup from the NiCad days where I have all my chargers plugged into a power strip and the strip is plugged into a 7 day electronic timer. It turns on for 2 hours (I think, can’t remember) once each week so I didn’t worry about the overcharging. I could probably ditch that now, but it’s not doing any harm.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

991 posts in 3146 days


#9 posted 08-08-2017 08:09 PM

I’ve always put them directly on charger from tool…thanks for info on that not being good for them! I’ll have to develop habit of leaving them off for a spell and then putting on charger. Knowing me, I’ll remember a few days later when I need them again :(

Kind of unrelated, but we’ve bought a 40V blower and push mower (yes, mower) from Ryobi and they actually work pretty good. They have a chain saw that runs on 2 40V batteries.


I doubt there s harm in it with lithium
batteries. Modern chargers have circuitry
in them to prevent over-charging.

One of the worst things you can do it
put a hot battery straight from a tool
you ve been using onto the charger.
That really cooks them.

- Loren


View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3818 days


#10 posted 08-08-2017 08:14 PM



I ve always put them directly on charger from tool…thanks for info on that not being good for them! I ll have to develop habit of leaving them off for a spell and then putting on charger. Knowing me, I ll remember a few days later when I need them again :(

Kind of unrelated, but we ve bought a 40V blower and push mower (yes, mower) from Ryobi and they actually work pretty good. They have a chain saw that runs on 2 40V batteries.

It’s the worst with the batteries in the larger
packs because the cells on the outside of
the cluster insulate the hot cells on the
inside. That’s why those Makita packs from
the drills with the long handles lasted so
long – it was just a stack of paired cells
so they dissipated heat well.

View plasma800's profile

plasma800

10 posts in 529 days


#11 posted 08-08-2017 08:17 PM

I didn’t read every post, maybe somebody already said this..

but I NEVER leave batteries on the chargers.

I had one melt over night into a steaming too hot to touch puddle of smoldering plastic and battery bits.. ever since then, I monitor all battery charging when I’m in the shop. If I leave the shop for any considerable time, I have one power strip that I flip off that pulls power from all chargers, and the LED lights on my miter saw station… it’s my shut down switch.

View DMiller's profile

DMiller

419 posts in 643 days


#12 posted 08-08-2017 08:18 PM

Thanks for the replies, guys! I really appreciate your answers!

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

View TaySC's profile

TaySC

270 posts in 504 days


#13 posted 08-08-2017 08:58 PM

It’s been maybe 10 years ago, but I ruined a Dremel battery by leaving it on the chrger around the clock. Thankfully, technology has improved and trickle chRogers should prevent that from happening.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

334 posts in 1249 days


#14 posted 08-08-2017 09:03 PM

I wonder how flashlight companies would feel if every company had a different shaped batttery? E.I. automobile manufactures. Same bitch about ink jet printers.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

388 posts in 1130 days


#15 posted 08-08-2017 09:41 PM

Leaving on trickle killed four of my dewalts…$70 ea

View Steve Peterson's profile

Steve Peterson

392 posts in 3253 days


#16 posted 08-08-2017 11:51 PM

One thing to keep in mind is that all Li-ion batteries must have a smart charger to prevent then from overcharging. It should be safe to leave these batteries in the charger, since it will go into standby mode after the charge cycle is complete. A few posters have mentioned to not take the battery out of the charger and immediately start using it in the tool. The risk here is only when the battery is still warm from charging, but it will cool down after the charge cycle is complete.

All of the information above is completely wrong in regards to the older Ni-cad batteries. Their lifetime will be significantly reduced if left in most chargers. They probably also should cool down after removing them from the charger and before using them in the tool.

-- Steve

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8128 posts in 2968 days


#17 posted 08-09-2017 12:02 AM


Just using that HF battery will damage the battery.

- Gilley23


Calling BS here….

I have abused my 18v Harbor Freight batteries terribly and they just keep on ticking. They run down after a year or two but a new one is only about $12 on sale and I’m back in business. Personally I can’t think of any reason to use anything else.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View TheFridge's profile (online now)

TheFridge

10494 posts in 1656 days


#18 posted 08-09-2017 01:31 AM

Check the manual.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5588 posts in 2579 days


#19 posted 08-09-2017 04:42 AM



I place my chargers on an old mechanical type light timer set to only run for 1 hour per day. This keeps the batteries topped up, but prevents any possibility of long-term overcharging. It also saves a small amount of power based on testing.

- splintergroup

A good idea. I made one along same lines but used a different timer.” http://lumberjocks.com/projects/261514":http://lumberjocks.com/projects/261514

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

766 posts in 3020 days


#20 posted 08-09-2017 06:04 AM

I’ve had the PC set(two drills and an impact driver) for 2-3 years now. I work them hard and leave them charging 24/7/365. No problems to report they are all still going strong.

-- Ken

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2338 posts in 1393 days


#21 posted 08-09-2017 03:26 PM


A good idea. I made one along same lines but used a different timer.” http://lumberjocks.com/projects/261514":http://lumberjocks.com/projects/261514

- woodbutcherbynight

I remember that post, thanks for referencing it!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3133 posts in 1651 days


#22 posted 08-09-2017 03:31 PM

Great question!!

...maybe that’s what happened to my Bosch 12V impact driver….....it only lasted a couple years.

Is there any way to determine this just by looking at the charger or battery?

Are the newer lithium batteries subject to this?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5588 posts in 2579 days


#23 posted 08-09-2017 03:52 PM

To my knowledge no, short of visually seeing leakage or damage to battery. Alot of variables go into battery failure. Heat, discharge rate, charging cycles etc etc. A timer that shuts down a battery charger limits the time on charge for the battery, power applied to active smart charger, potential for short and fire. Will it extend indefinitely the life of a battery? No, they are limited just like car batteries. They will only take x amount of recharge cycles before they finally die.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View jmos's profile

jmos

889 posts in 2540 days


#24 posted 08-09-2017 06:50 PM

I’m cautious about it; a couple of years ago I had a DeWalt battery on the charger, in the basement – I came downstairs to find a melted mess. Ruined the battery and the charger. Damn glad it didn’t start a fire. Now I never leave batteries on the charger unattended. I’m sure the new ones are better; and if the manual says it’s OK, I’m sure it is, but I never do anymore.

-- John

View TaySC's profile

TaySC

270 posts in 504 days


#25 posted 08-09-2017 11:21 PM



A few posters have mentioned to not take the battery out of the charger and immediately start using it in the tool. The risk here is only when the battery is still warm from charging, but it will cool down after the charge cycle is complete.

- Steve Peterson

I think you have it backwards. What I read was that it’s bad to take it straight from using with a tool and immediately throwing it back on the charger. In fact, most of mine will show an error and won’t even charge until they cool down for awhile.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com