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View SethA73's profile

Staining and finishing

by SethA73
posted 08-08-2017 05:46 PM


8 replies so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

3329 posts in 669 days


#1 posted 08-09-2017 12:24 AM

Flexner on Finishing is generally considered to be the go-to authority. It’s my least favorite however. Two others I prefer are Jeff Jewitt’s Great Wood Finishes and Foolproof Wood Finishing by Teri Masaschi.

Last, but not least, our very own Charles Neil has a generous collection of videos on youtube you can watch for free. His DVD series is excellent as well. You can learn more on his web site http://www.cn-woodworking.com and by searching for his name on youtube.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View SethA73's profile

SethA73

5 posts in 371 days


#2 posted 08-09-2017 03:17 AM

Awesome. Thanks for the advice.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

29651 posts in 2417 days


#3 posted 08-09-2017 03:29 AM

I would contact Charles Neil. He’s a member here also. Great guy and willing to share his knowledge.

-- Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View jbay's profile

jbay

2484 posts in 978 days


#4 posted 08-09-2017 03:37 AM

I m a real novice and would love to have the tried and tested ways of the Jedi wood worker in my cloak pocket.

- SethA73

I would like to add that in order to get that ”Jedi wood worker in your pocket” it will take many, many years of mixing wrong products, stripping down finishes and re doing them, sanding out runs, and lots of other obstacles that will show up unexpectedly the next day.
But remember, it’s the journey right.

View OSU55's profile (online now)

OSU55

1779 posts in 2069 days


#5 posted 08-09-2017 08:09 PM

Flexner’s & Jewitt’s books are my go resources. After you have absorbed the info on different coloring techniques, finishes, sealers, when what is needed or not, lay out your own test plan for each finish or “look”, and test each on different woods. Take lots of notes in a finishing journal, and record future project finish schedules for reference. Yes it becomes a large matrix with a lot of tests that require a lot of time. Pay it now on test pieces and not on a big pretty project you put hours and hours into. It takes practice, practice, and more practice to become a master of a skill set.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17552 posts in 3086 days


#6 posted 08-09-2017 08:24 PM

A true jedi deals only in experience.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View jimbrown's profile

jimbrown

22 posts in 374 days


#7 posted 08-09-2017 08:40 PM

Caution on REFINISHING, If the piece is old and good consider restoring the finish to keep the value instead of taking it off and loosing value.

-- JimBrown

View Rich's profile

Rich

3329 posts in 669 days


#8 posted 08-09-2017 08:48 PM



Caution on REFINISHING, If the piece is old and good consider restoring the finish to keep the value instead of taking it off and loosing value.

- jimbrown

That’s a very good point Jim makes. I’d kind of lost track of the fact you’re restoring a dresser when I made my book recommendations.

For refinishing/restoring furniture I strongly recommend the book The Furniture Bible: Everything You Need to Know to Identify, Restore & Care for Furniture by Christophe Pourny. He is a second generation antique restorer and dealer. The book is a fun read since he not only discusses periods of furniture design and materials, but has a large section where he walks you through his works, right down to what he uses and how he applies it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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