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All Replies on How do you create the rough cut mill looking texture?

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View Danestar's profile

How do you create the rough cut mill looking texture?

by Danestar
posted 05-21-2010 07:36 PM


24 replies so far

View lew's profile

lew

10351 posts in 2621 days


#1 posted 05-21-2010 07:37 PM

How about sand/soda blasting the surface?

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Danestar's profile

Danestar

32 posts in 1915 days


#2 posted 05-21-2010 07:44 PM

Ahhhh now that makes sense.

View uffitze's profile

uffitze

199 posts in 1821 days


#3 posted 05-21-2010 08:25 PM

There are probably a lot of different systems all of which give a slightly different look.

Some ideas …

  • When you flatten the initial face of a board on the jointer, take just enough passes to get the board to sit flat. (That’s proper jointer technique anyway.) Then when you plane the board to thickness, take all of your passes off of the other side. This will leave a board with some mill marks, and some smooth spots on your show side. The obvious drawback to this idea is that the board cup/twist/bow due to the taking all of your planing passes from the same side. But, then again, if you T&G it, and nail it to a floor, it’s probably not going anywhere.
  • Build yourself a “surfacing” machine not unlike the drum sanders that some of the guys here have built, but with a circular arbor, and some sort of cutting or grinding attachment to give the sawmill look. (Sounds dangerous.) Joint/plane as normal and send your boards through your surfacing machine.
  • A variation on the surfacing machine idea … get yourself a crappy table saw with a dull blade that will leave lots of marks, set up some featherboards so you can run your stock through on edge, put the guards on the saw. Again, joint/plane as normal to get even stock.
  • Use standard distressing methods (chains, rocks, hammers, sandblasting) in conjunction with whatever idea you use to get the regular “sawmill” pattern.
View GregD's profile

GregD

659 posts in 2002 days


#4 posted 05-21-2010 08:34 PM

How do I achieve rough cut and rough scraped wood? I’ve been working for the past year or so to not achieve rough wood when I work it. Making good wood look bad is no-problemo for me. I must be a natural! 8-)

-- Greg D.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

113203 posts in 2443 days


#5 posted 05-21-2010 08:37 PM

You can make the rough cut look buy setting up your fence on a band saw and running the board backwards so it rubs against your blade.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5725 posts in 2451 days


#6 posted 05-21-2010 08:39 PM

please write this down carefully, whack the wood at regulo mark 99 for twenty four hours beating constantly with a sock full of cold grits ,and the rub down with an elderly naked lady for four hours on both sides .Then when allowed to cool down,a final wipe down with a dirty diaper full of wet sawdust and donkey fur .Then a final pass over with scalding hot leg irons or chains to texturise the surface, then soak the completed project red beetles urine about forty gallons should do for a week,then leave over the next forty years to dry out in the desert sun.And if that doesn’t work I really have nothing better to suggest.PS please don’t block this message as it may one day save a few bucks to someone.and as a half live morphined Scotsman this is ultra important. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

113203 posts in 2443 days


#7 posted 05-21-2010 08:42 PM

Your great Alistair!

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5725 posts in 2451 days


#8 posted 05-21-2010 08:49 PM

I always new it but am too shy to shout or proclaim it from the rooftops .That is till I discovered Morphine loosened the tongue somewhat, or in this case the keyboard LOL .Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

113203 posts in 2443 days


#9 posted 05-21-2010 08:51 PM

Keep shouting it works

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Danestar's profile

Danestar

32 posts in 1915 days


#10 posted 05-21-2010 08:54 PM

Thanks guys… I am trying to find the image on my phone showing what I’m talking about specifically. As soon as I locate it I will post up.

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

614 posts in 2230 days


#11 posted 05-21-2010 09:17 PM

I have to say the old circle mills are becoming a thing of the past. First off the running of one and care for the saw (Sharpening, Hammer, Swedging) are becoming a lost art in this modern era of band milling. Also Circle saw mills not being able to compete with modern efficiency are slowly going out of business or upgrading to band saw. Lumber with circle saw marks from the saw mill surely are harder to find. This will become more of a prominent question as time continues to pass.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1500 posts in 2991 days


#12 posted 05-21-2010 10:41 PM

For the scraped floor look, several of the power planers actually have alternate blades to help with that. Not my aesthetic, but perhaps a tool you could use.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Gary's profile

Gary

7900 posts in 2299 days


#13 posted 05-21-2010 10:46 PM

Hey fellow Texan…...come home. We’ve got lots of mills where you can buy it that way!!

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View Les Casteel's profile

Les Casteel

157 posts in 1925 days


#14 posted 05-22-2010 12:35 AM

In the past I’ve taken an old 10” sawblade, laid it on the bench and tapped down one tooth just a little with a wood mallet. then skip 4 or 5 teeth, bend another, then run the wood through and it somewhat simulates the old sawmill look. Of course the sawblade is useless for real work after that so mark it in some way.

-- Les, Arkansas, www.woodthatrocks.com

View Tim Lawson's profile

Tim Lawson

17 posts in 1817 days


#15 posted 05-22-2010 06:04 PM

Go back to the original surfacing method – a hand adze? It’s on my agenda to make one and learn to use it. The demonstrations I’ve seen are remarkably fast. Not rough cut but still a random hewn look. Wouldn’t scale to production but could be fun (and quiet) in a smaller shop.

Tim

-- Tim Lawson http://www.ptwoodschool.com http://www.timlawson.net

View BOB67CAM's profile

BOB67CAM

269 posts in 1937 days


#16 posted 05-22-2010 06:19 PM

ive used a wire wheel and a drill alot for this type of look, if u want it to follow the grain pretty well anyway…

-- if you dont have it, build it, especially when its a stupid idea

View rance's profile

rance

4155 posts in 2026 days


#17 posted 05-22-2010 06:23 PM

I’ve used Jim’s method with the bandsaw for a while now. It works great.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View MattyMeyero's profile

MattyMeyero

4 posts in 219 days


#18 posted 03-12-2015 07:48 PM

I do it alot- I like to just take my Electric Brush-chainsaw and run the Bar flat to my surface. Give it a whirl. Looks excellent all said and done- with excellent control. Heres a pub sign i did where it’s on the lighter side.

-- I'm the best there is at what I do, what I do sure is purrdy.

View MattyMeyero's profile

MattyMeyero

4 posts in 219 days


#19 posted 03-12-2015 07:48 PM

-- I'm the best there is at what I do, what I do sure is purrdy.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

188 posts in 1131 days


#20 posted 03-12-2015 07:53 PM

Bob67, has a real cheap method I’ve seen used with great results.

View patron's profile

patron

13335 posts in 2207 days


#21 posted 03-12-2015 08:06 PM

i got a cheap block plane
and slightly rounded the blade
just skip run it with the grain
it leaves hills and valleys
that come out nice too

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

7748 posts in 722 days


#22 posted 03-12-2015 08:18 PM

I used an angle grinder a few weeks ago to take paint off of some timbers before I planed it. Have the grinder wheel running as you slide it sideways . It make marks like that of a saw, though the marks will only be about 1” long. If you keep doing it over the who,e board it looks pretty good. Also if you go back and forth flipping the tool around the arcs go one direction and then the other.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View Danestar's profile

Danestar

32 posts in 1915 days


#23 posted 03-12-2015 09:03 PM

For those who know how to do it can you provide examples? The one above looks great!

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

1828 posts in 841 days


#24 posted 03-12-2015 09:12 PM

Anderson Hardwood Flooring Company came out with the first hand scraped, prefinished flooring on the market. It is called Virginia Vintage. It is done by hand with hand scrapers. I can tell you more of the story of how this is done, but don’t want to bore anyone. There are several companies in southern California that will do custom hand scraping of hardwood. If you are in So. Cal, contact Virginia Hardwood Company in Azusa, California.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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