LumberJocks

All Replies on Methods of creating raised panels

  • Advertise with us
View Bill's profile

Methods of creating raised panels

by Bill
posted 2621 days ago


35 replies so far

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2815 days


#1 posted 2621 days ago

I’m a shaper user, but in the old days I used a table saw and ran the panel at an angle similar to Marks crown moulding method. Do not try this on an arched panel!

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2811 days


#2 posted 2621 days ago

I haven’t tackled raised panels, yet but was planning on using the tablesaw with a jig as seen in several magazines when I did. As you noted,the bits are expensive. In your entry bench project, your raised panels are great, why mess with perfection?

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2662 days


#3 posted 2620 days ago

Thanks! I liked how the panels came out for this project.

I am just exploring other ways of doing things to improve my results and gain consistency. Not to mention, I would like to find an easier way to do things if they are out there.

The router/shaper with a backcutter would make it a one step process. There are also some interesting profiles available with the various router bits. At the same time, the costs are much greater than creating a jig for the table saw. As Dennis mentioned, this would not work if you wanted to create arched panels.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Karson's profile

Karson

34796 posts in 2901 days


#4 posted 2619 days ago

I use Router table and usually router bits without the backcutter. I bought a separate back cutter bit. This was because I’ve got some 5mm slots router bits (Yes Don, metric) it was because I was using some resawn wood that was a little shy of 1/4” which is what most raised panel bits use.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2737 days


#5 posted 2619 days ago

Router with a back cutter from CMT

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2662 days


#6 posted 2619 days ago

Well we seem to be hitting each area equally – router, shaper, and table saw. Interesting how there is not just one method of creating panels.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2747 days


#7 posted 2617 days ago

I use a router also without the back cutter. it came out fine, I just rabbited the back side of the panel when you’re done with the front. It’s easier and less expensive and I think gives you more options, dont forget your spaceballs.. mike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2737 days


#8 posted 2617 days ago

I also use a stile/rail router bit set because I love the fancy little moulding and it gives your panel a nice place to sit. Spaceballs?

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2800 days


#9 posted 2617 days ago

I have a combination style/rail router bit, & I’ve been using a Ogee vertical raised panel bit. I’ve been buying my bits from MLCS, Their prices are reasonable, & I’ve had good service out of these bits, & they also have free shipping which holds down the price.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Philip Edwards's profile

Philip Edwards

244 posts in 2940 days


#10 posted 2617 days ago

Bill
I have used router bits to raise panels. Noisy and always feels a bit dangerous. I have also roughed out panels on the table saw – a high fence and featherboards is necessary on that one.
My last few panels I made using a rebate plane. It was quiet, peaceful and surprisingly quick work. I now aim to a make a panelraising plane (maybe my next project)
Hope this helps
Phil

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2662 days


#11 posted 2617 days ago

Mike, I used the table saw and spaceballs on my entry bench. I also backcut the panels on my router table. This seem to work just fine.

I like the idea of a complete router bit set. I like the idea of a backcut on the panels to allow them to expand without cracking the frame. While the one step approach appeals to me (efficiency), doing each part separately does have its benefits as well.

Thanks for the tip on bits Dick. I have a catalog from MLCS, and have been drooling over the bits.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2800 days


#12 posted 2616 days ago

The vertical raised panel bits are a smaller diameter than the horizontal, so I think they are safer. However they can’t be used on arched panels. The one I’ve been using is the Ogee pattern.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2747 days


#13 posted 2616 days ago

Ogees my favorite and you better tell Obi what a spaceball is Bill or he’ll go crazy on us, I’ve seen it happen, it is’nt pretty. mike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2815 days


#14 posted 2616 days ago

Don’t tell him it can be fun to watch if you are far enough away!

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2737 days


#15 posted 2616 days ago

Too late …. Crazy already set in. And I’ve seen them little rubber spacer things.

And the drooling gets to be a little annoying… for those around me.

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

767 posts in 2674 days


#16 posted 2616 days ago

Bill,

I just got the latest issue of Shop Notes in the mail, and it has a section detailing some fairly easy methods of creating raised panels.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View Don's profile

Don

2598 posts in 2677 days


#17 posted 2616 days ago

I look forward to receiving that issue, Ethan, That’s the only woodworking mag to which I subscribe.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://dpb-photography.me/

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2662 days


#18 posted 2616 days ago

I will be looking for that issue as well.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2737 days


#19 posted 2615 days ago

Bill, you’ve got mail

View Teach's profile

Teach

12 posts in 2609 days


#20 posted 2601 days ago

I suggest embracing all the methods of raising panels. You’ll finally pick the one you are most comfortable with based on the quality of your cut.

The table saw is not suited to arched panels, and the profiles you can achieve are limited. Router bits are expensive, but the extra expense is well worth the variety of profiles available, and the ease of use. The key here is to have a powerful router with variable speed in a suitable router table – the larger panel raising bits will get you nervous at first, but once you use a couple of them, you’ll quickly see their value.

You can (should try if you haven’t) raise a panel with a cove cut on the table saw, with the panel flat to the table. Simply set up for a cove cut using an sacrificial fence clamped to the table at the correct angle as you would for any cove cut. The only difference is that you’ll bury part of the blade below and into the sacrificial fence. Tilting the blade create more possibilities for the curvature of the cove. Most would agree the working a large panel flat to the table is safer than with it vertical to the blade, and it the only way to get the 1/2 cove profile.

-- Larry, New Jersey

View Teach's profile

Teach

12 posts in 2609 days


#21 posted 2601 days ago

By the way Bill, nice job on the entry bench – panels look nicely sanded/softened and well proportioned. Great finish too!

-- Larry, New Jersey

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2662 days


#22 posted 2601 days ago

Thanks Teach. I like the way the panels came out as well. It is probably the project I am most proud of right now. That is until the next panel job comes around.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Karson's profile

Karson

34796 posts in 2901 days


#23 posted 2600 days ago

I had a problem with the little space balls staying in place when trying to use them. So went to the “Big Box Store’ and bought weatherstripping that was lifetime rubber, sticky back and would fit in the 1/4” slot for the raised panels. It works great. I use an Allen Wrench to press them down into the groove.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Dollarbill's profile

Dollarbill

91 posts in 2638 days


#24 posted 2600 days ago

Great work Bill. I use both the TS and Shaper, sometimes in a combination. The big cutters on the shaper are a little scarey.

Bill

-- Make Dust

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2662 days


#25 posted 2600 days ago

Thanks Bill !

Karson, I did as well at first. However, my joint was just tight enough for them to stay in, unless I bumped it. Anyway, I did manage to add two to each side like was recommended. I did like how they worked though.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Karson's profile

Karson

34796 posts in 2901 days


#26 posted 2600 days ago

Maybe some rubber cement would make them stay until you get the panels in place.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2662 days


#27 posted 2600 days ago

I had not thought of that. If it did not dry hard then it might work. Everything I heard says do not glue the panels, but you never know.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View jpw1995's profile

jpw1995

373 posts in 2798 days


#28 posted 2599 days ago

I’ve seen the raised panel router bit sets advertised, and it looks like they could be a very good investment for someone who makes a lot of raised panel doors. It looks to me like they could save you a lot of time over the table saw method, but I’ve never used them so I can’t say for sure. Do you have to use a monster 3hp router for the larger bits to be effective, or will the 1-3/4hp routers do the job just as well?

-- JP, Shelbyville, KY

View Karson's profile

Karson

34796 posts in 2901 days


#29 posted 2599 days ago

Bill I was talking about rubber cement on the space balls to hold them in the bottom of the slot until the panels were in.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2737 days


#30 posted 2599 days ago

JPW I was using a 2 1/4 hp hitachi variable speed router slowed down to 8000 rpm and making two passes. Cutting out the first part (about half of the raised panel) and then cutting out the rest of it.

I still want a 3 1/4 hp Hitachi Router to see if it is significantly better.

View Karson's profile

Karson

34796 posts in 2901 days


#31 posted 2599 days ago

So the DO NOT BUY HITACHI is limited to only the contractors saw!

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2737 days


#32 posted 2599 days ago

Yes Karson.. so far

I have several Htachi products and the saw is the only thing I’m having problems with. I had a Hitachi Sliding COmpound Miter Saw about 15 years ago that i thought wa s agreat saw. That was why I started buying all this Hitachi Equipment

View tooljunky's profile

tooljunky

34 posts in 2611 days


#33 posted 2599 days ago

I never cared much for the space balls for doing raised panels. I like the Panalighn strips that center up the panels in the stiles and rails. Go to WWW.sommerfeldtools.com they sell them and have free shiping they are not all that high. Also for the raise panels I had alway been a shaper user prior to using a set of router bits They work nice. I still put the panel bit in my shaper but a guy would not need to. I have a couple of 3 1/4 hp porter cable routers that I have set up in router tables that I think are great, I run the coping and sticking cutters in which are fully capabile of running the panel bit. I still think a person needs to make two passes on the panel to prevent tear out

-- vlee2@ford.com

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2737 days


#34 posted 2599 days ago

Two passes is always better. Less wear on the router, and better to look at your progress when taking out a large amount of material

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2662 days


#35 posted 2599 days ago

Very good point on the two passes. A lot of articles I have read suggest that as well.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase