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View CharlieM1958's profile

Surge Protection

by CharlieM1958
posted 03-15-2010 07:31 PM


27 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2305 days


#1 posted 03-15-2010 07:45 PM

no it will not – but that’s a great excuse to use why you NEED to setup shop and upgrade electricity ;)

the problem with the copier is indeed surges, or busts, but with the table saw it’s peak amp request from the motor. if any – it’ll trip off your surge protector but will not fix the dimming lights. well, I guess if it’ll trip off the surge protector everytime you’ll turn your saw on – it WILL help with the dimming lights problem, but I don’t think your saw will cut too well with the blade not turning.

Another option is to move your saw to your office- since everyone there is already used to the dimming lights ;)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#2 posted 03-15-2010 07:59 PM

LOL!

An electrical upgrade is definitely in the future anyway. I’m just not sure exactly how far in the future. Our house is about 35 years old, and the swimming pool, with all its related equipment were added later, so the panel is pretty well maxed out in its current (no pun intended) configuration.

The best thing in my favor is that Lynda knows she can’t have a hot tub without the upgrade. :-)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View LeeG's profile

LeeG

40 posts in 1677 days


#3 posted 03-15-2010 08:08 PM

When a motor starts, it briefly draws considerably more amps than when it is running. This is the reason people run higher HP motors on 220, as the required amps is cut in half. When you start your table saw, you hear it change in pitch briefly. That first sound is when it basically wants more amps than is available. If you have enough amps, you start right up with that steady sound. The easiest way to get more amps is to double the voltage.

-- Lee in Phoenix

View degoose's profile

degoose

7014 posts in 2011 days


#4 posted 03-15-2010 11:05 PM

And this is probably why Australia… a land Down under… runs 240V …

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2956 days


#5 posted 03-15-2010 11:57 PM

You should ask your power company to put a recording devise on your meter.

You may be getting low voltage from your transformer.

I had a dimming problem at our lake home, & burned out two saws.

The power co. put a recorder on my line, & they ended up changing my transformer.

No charge to me, & no more dimming problems.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View pommy's profile

pommy

1697 posts in 2347 days


#6 posted 03-16-2010 12:09 AM

hate the stuff it bites hard never touch it never will but i know a man who can thats all i will say on the subject LOL….......

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14752 posts in 2332 days


#7 posted 03-16-2010 12:32 AM

Charlie, If you can go to 220 on the saw it may stop it and may not. How do you have UPS without a battery back up?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#8 posted 03-16-2010 01:34 AM

The UPS has a battery, but it has some outlets that are battery-protected, and some outlets that are only surge-protected.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Wood_smith's profile

Wood_smith

251 posts in 1681 days


#9 posted 03-16-2010 01:47 AM

Buy the missus that hot tub first, and you’re golden for upgrading the power and a saw!!

-- Lloyd Kerry; creator of the Kerry-All Pouch, http://www.kerrywoodworking.com

View Routerisstillmyname's profile

Routerisstillmyname

705 posts in 2165 days


#10 posted 03-16-2010 04:23 AM

short term, all you need is AC line regulator. used furman AR117 will do the trick.
Long term= $$$$$

-- Router è ancora il mio nome.

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1763 days


#11 posted 03-16-2010 04:52 AM

Yeah! What thay said. Yesterday I could not spell electrician, today I are one.

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 2366 days


#12 posted 03-16-2010 06:07 AM

sounds like the ups contains a line conditioner (regulator) as well as a ups It doesn’t seem like a suppressor would help the dimming. I have two separate units. they do help

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View WoodSparky's profile

WoodSparky

200 posts in 1758 days


#13 posted 03-16-2010 06:51 AM

Charlie, My first question would be, is your table saw on the same circuit as your lights? A solution might be to run a seperate circuit for your saw. A surge protector for your saw probably would not help. A whole house surge protector wired into your electrical panel is always a good idea.

-- So Many tools, So little time

View Eagle1's profile

Eagle1

2066 posts in 1721 days


#14 posted 03-16-2010 01:23 PM

It sounds like you have to many things plugged into that line for the size of breaker you have in the box. You might see if you can put a little bit larger one in there. If not unplug a couple of the other things on the curcuit, even the are turned on they still draw power. There is a item that you can get that you plug in between the item and the power outlet to test how much power it is drawing when it is not being used. Then you can see which one is drawing to most and then unplug it when not using it. I personally unpulg all my tools at the end of the day, and flip the breaker for my 220 also.

-- Tim, Missouri ....Inside every older person is a younger person wondering what the heck happened

View lumberdustjohn's profile

lumberdustjohn

1256 posts in 1823 days


#15 posted 03-16-2010 01:57 PM

You could try balancing the loads in your breaker box.
Make sure you are pulling off both sides of the circuits evenly.

You may have all of your heavy loads on one side.
Every other 120 v. breaker is on the same pole.

Switching your table saw to 220 v. should help.

What size is your service ran at? 60 amp? 100 amp? 200 amp?

-- Safety first because someone needs you.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#16 posted 03-16-2010 02:41 PM

WoodSparky; The momentary dimming occurs on lights that are not on the same circuit.

Tim: I know that things like TV’s and computers draw power even when they are turned off, but I didn’t think that was the case for power tools, and that’s all that is plugged in to the same circuit. Correct me if I’m wrong on that.

John: I’m pretty sure I have 200 amp service since my house is 2,500 sq. ft. living area and has two central air units. I must confess, though, I’ve never looked in the main panel that closely, since there is a subpanel inside with all the 20 amp breakers for the house lights and outlets.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2956 days


#17 posted 03-16-2010 03:46 PM

I still think you should have your incoming line voltage monitored.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#18 posted 03-16-2010 03:49 PM

Thanks, Dick… that is worth a try.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2956 days


#19 posted 03-16-2010 04:07 PM

The power company should cooperate if you ask.

They could have too many customers on one transformer.

They want their customers to be happy.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View lumberdustjohn's profile

lumberdustjohn

1256 posts in 1823 days


#20 posted 03-16-2010 05:50 PM

200 amp service is large enough.
I would switch the saw to 220 v.

-- Safety first because someone needs you.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2305 days


#21 posted 03-16-2010 06:02 PM

Just a quick note to all those suggestions to ’’switch the saw to 220v’’:

switching the saw to 220v means that you need to put a 220v breaker in your panel.

now

a 220v breaker takes as much space as a 110v 30amp breaker
a 220v breaker will not enable you to have those lights running on the same line anymore!

it also really depends on the wires that you have already, a 220v line requires 2 hot wires, and your run wires may not have 2 available prongs for hots – although they probably do.

if your breaker is less than 20amp, you may be able to just swap it with a 20amp breaker (depending on your run wires – if they can take 20amp) since the saw is only 13amps, that should be sufficient for that line.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#22 posted 03-16-2010 06:41 PM

Sharon, in theory, I’m probably in good shape. On the other side of the garage there is an unused 220 outlet for a dryer. (We use a gas dryer.) I would have to rewire the motor and make up a longer cord (I would need about 15 feet of wire between the motor and the outlet.

I just hate fooling with that stuff since I’m not that knowledgeable about it. I don’t mind changing outlets, switches, or light fixtures, because it is pretty much a case duplicating connections that I’m looking at. If I have to know what goes where, I’m in trouble. :-)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2956 days


#23 posted 03-16-2010 07:05 PM

Your saw motor should have a wiring diagram on the cover for switching wires to 240 volts.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Brad_Nailor's profile

Brad_Nailor

2531 posts in 2614 days


#24 posted 03-16-2010 07:29 PM

Charlie
When I bought my Unisaw it was single phase 230v. I share the outlet for my dryer, till I can run a dedicated feed and sub panel. I used a 25’ piece of 12/3 and put a dryer plug on one end and a 230v receptacle on the other end. My saws manual recommended 12 gage wire for any extensions and that they not be more than 50 feet. My saw runs great and I don’t have any problems with blinking lights..I just cant run my saw when the wife’s doing laundry!

-- http://www.facebook.com/pages/DSO-Designs/297237806954248

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#25 posted 03-16-2010 07:44 PM

David, tell her that’s what clotheslines are for. :-)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View 308Gap's profile

308Gap

332 posts in 1659 days


#26 posted 03-16-2010 08:11 PM

If you call the power company out they might want to look around some, if anything is not to code they tell code enforcement, guess who knocks on your door next. My little city recently went INC. and they found a great source of revenue….........me. food for thought.

-- Thank You Veterans!

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2875 days


#27 posted 03-16-2010 08:21 PM

That’s a very good point, 308Gap.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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