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View CharlesA's profile

Are there any differences between the different basic spindle sanders?

by CharlesA
posted 02-11-2017 09:02 PM


32 replies so far

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

524 posts in 746 days


#1 posted 02-11-2017 09:18 PM

I have an old Ryobi that appears to be the same sander. I will say that it works Ok. If it’ll ever die, I’ll upgrade to the Ridgid unit.

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1752 posts in 3011 days


#2 posted 02-11-2017 09:32 PM

i couldn’t tell if you are looking for a spindle sander but I’ve used the Rigid Oscillating belt and spindle sander for about 10 years and it does everything I need. I would recommend it and if you do buy it register it for lifetime maintenance.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View thomasfurman's profile

thomasfurman

22 posts in 495 days


#3 posted 02-11-2017 09:33 PM

I bought the Wen because, like you, I realized they’re all the same.

Zero complaints with it!

View Rich's profile

Rich

2820 posts in 587 days


#4 posted 02-11-2017 09:34 PM

I have the WEN and it suits my occasional need to clean up a band or saber saw curve cut. If you want something suitable for a production shop, it might not be the best choice.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5658 posts in 2811 days


#5 posted 02-11-2017 11:01 PM

The ridgid has the added benefit of a tilting table + belt sander. Add a miter gauge and you can chamfer tenons and all sorts of other operations. Plus it has a bigger table than most.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5658 posts in 2811 days


#6 posted 02-11-2017 11:02 PM

The ridgid has the added benefit of a tilting table + belt sander. Add a miter gauge and you can chamfer tenons and all sorts of other operations. Plus it has a bigger table than most.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Rich's profile

Rich

2820 posts in 587 days


#7 posted 02-11-2017 11:25 PM


The ridgid has the added benefit of a tilting table + belt sander. Add a miter gauge and you can chamfer tenons and all sorts of other operations. Plus it has a bigger table than most.

- pintodeluxe

But it doesn’t look like it will fit inside some spaces, like circle cuts. Is it convertible or something?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Matt's profile

Matt

160 posts in 949 days


#8 posted 02-11-2017 11:39 PM

I’ve got the Woodriver version. No complaints, works as described, and I picked it up on sale (i.e. at a normal, non-woodcraft price.) Looks identical (with the exception of the color) with the three pictured in the OP.

-- My "projects" always look better with beer goggles.

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

707 posts in 856 days


#9 posted 02-12-2017 12:05 AM


The ridgid has the added benefit of a tilting table + belt sander. Add a miter gauge and you can chamfer tenons and all sorts of other operations. Plus it has a bigger table than most.

- pintodeluxe

But it doesn t look like it will fit inside some spaces, like circle cuts. Is it convertible or something?

- RichTaylor

Yes. It changes from a belt sander to a spindle sander. Very versatile. Watch some of the you tubes on it. Best bang for your buck.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3322 posts in 1795 days


#10 posted 02-12-2017 12:15 AM

Btw, I look for a good deal on the ridgid from time to time. Looked these up today and thought it was really interesting that what looks like the same exact sander can be had with that kind of price difference—the Triton is 70% higher. I was curious if Triton specs theirs at a higher level.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Rich's profile

Rich

2820 posts in 587 days


#11 posted 02-12-2017 12:55 AM


Btw, I look for a good deal on the ridgid from time to time. Looked these up today and thought it was really interesting that what looks like the same exact sander can be had with that kind of price difference—the Triton is 70% higher. I was curious if Triton specs theirs at a higher level.

- CharlesA

I saw the same thing pointed out about different brands of thickness planers. They were identical outside of some minor cosmetic things like color, etc. I believe that it’s because they all are made by the same manufacturer in China.

I saw the similarity in spindle sanders and just bought the cheapest one.

Someone please correct me if I’m wrong. It was an article I glanced over, and that’s what I took away from it.

Edit: Check out images of Cutech, Rikon and General spiral head planers and you can see what I mean.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

707 posts in 856 days


#12 posted 02-12-2017 01:04 AM

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1330 posts in 1222 days


#13 posted 02-12-2017 01:08 AM



Btw, I look for a good deal on the ridgid from time to time. Looked these up today and thought it was really interesting that what looks like the same exact sander can be had with that kind of price difference—the Triton is 70% higher. I was curious if Triton specs theirs at a higher level.

- CharlesA

I was disappointed in the spindle sander portion of the rigid combo sander. The edge sander is great but the sanding sleeve on the spindle constantly slips so you really can’t get much sanding done. The rubber drum is too hard, so you can’t tighten it enough to deform it to put pressure on the sleeve to keep it from catching on the wood and stay in place while the rubber drum spins. Mine was really worthless so I just ended up getting an upright Grizzly.

I believe the Harbor freight version of the spindle sander has good reviews, so might be worth a try. If it doesn’t work out, you can at least take it back easy enough.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3322 posts in 1795 days


#14 posted 02-12-2017 01:14 AM


I believe the Harbor freight version of the spindle sander has good reviews, so might be worth a try. If it doesn t work out, you can at least take it back easy enough.

- AZWoody

That Harbor Freight one is $30 more than the Wen from HD or Amazon.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1330 posts in 1222 days


#15 posted 02-12-2017 01:40 AM


I believe the Harbor freight version of the spindle sander has good reviews, so might be worth a try. If it doesn t work out, you can at least take it back easy enough.

- AZWoody

That Harbor Freight one is $30 more than the Wen from HD or Amazon.

- CharlesA

Even so, being able to walk in and inspect it might be worth that $30 rather than waiting for the mail and getting something you have to return.

Where I live I have to rely on mail order for almost anything but if I do ever get the chance of getting something in person, I will usually pay a little extra for that.

That’s why I think that way but for most people it’s the opposite.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3322 posts in 1795 days


#16 posted 02-12-2017 01:57 AM

Anybody care that the Ridgid is aluminum table while all the clones are cast iron?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

707 posts in 856 days


#17 posted 02-12-2017 02:04 AM


Btw, I look for a good deal on the ridgid from time to time. Looked these up today and thought it was really interesting that what looks like the same exact sander can be had with that kind of price difference—the Triton is 70% higher. I was curious if Triton specs theirs at a higher level.

- CharlesA

I was disappointed in the spindle sander portion of the rigid combo sander. The edge sander is great but the sanding sleeve on the spindle constantly slips so you really can t get much sanding done. The rubber drum is too hard, so you can t tighten it enough to deform it to put pressure on the sleeve to keep it from catching on the wood and stay in place while the rubber drum spins. Mine was really worthless so I just ended up getting an upright Grizzly.

I believe the Harbor freight version of the spindle sander has good reviews, so might be worth a try. If it doesn t work out, you can at least take it back easy enough.

- AZWoody

First time I’ve heard that as a problem. Are you using the right washer on top?

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1770 posts in 1892 days


#18 posted 02-12-2017 02:11 AM

I got the Wen a year ago and it’s been great. I looked at that Triton the other week up close for the first time and I couldn’t tell a difference except the color and the on/off switch, which ain’t worth an extra $70. I don’t use mine a lot, so at this level of machinery I went with the cheapest one.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5658 posts in 2811 days


#19 posted 02-12-2017 04:39 AM

The knob to tighten spindles on the Ridgid is tool-free. I made a wooden wrench to fit over the knob. Now it’s easy to get the sleeves tight enough. Problem solved.

Interestingly, I use the belt feature 95% of the time because it’s better for faring gentle curves.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 2108 days


#20 posted 02-12-2017 04:51 AM

Anybody care that the Ridgid is aluminum table while all the clones are cast iron?

Nope! It’s a sander, not a surface plate.

I’ll echo that it’s a great value. I use mine all the time. Really one of the jewels of the Rigid line…

The dust collection is better than expected, too. This is very important to me, as I often use it to make curved templates from MDF which are then used as router templates. The only time I’ve had the spindle slip is when I forgot the washer at the top of the spindle.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7891 posts in 2148 days


#21 posted 02-12-2017 05:26 AM

Don’t get one of those basic ones. I have the one from HF. It sucks. Do yourself a favor and buy the Rigid one. Super easy to stall it out.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1355 posts in 1212 days


#22 posted 02-12-2017 05:26 PM


I believe the Harbor freight version of the spindle sander has good reviews, so might be worth a try. If it doesn t work out, you can at least take it back easy enough.

- AZWoody

That Harbor Freight one is $30 more than the Wen from HD or Amazon.

- CharlesA

Even so, being able to walk in and inspect it might be worth that $30 rather than waiting for the mail and getting something you have to return.

Where I live I have to rely on mail order for almost anything but if I do ever get the chance of getting something in person, I will usually pay a little extra for that.

That s why I think that way but for most people it s the opposite.

- AZWoody

I have a HF spindle sander- It is OK. But https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44bGZvx24yM&ab_channel=MountainStorm There are some things you can not do in a store. Wen tools are comming on strong, that would be the one for me, if I were to purchase today. If it is defective Amazon will pay the return shippimg.

-- Desert_Woodworker

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waho6o9

8190 posts in 2575 days


#23 posted 02-12-2017 05:38 PM

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

11626 posts in 2378 days


#24 posted 02-12-2017 06:02 PM

I have the Wen, no complaints so far.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

504 posts in 738 days


#25 posted 02-12-2017 06:18 PM

Charles,

My 2 cents, when I was faced with getting a spindle sander, I opted to drop the extra coin and get the Ridgid. I figured for the combined machine I couldn’t beat it. The table is nice and flat, plenty of power when sanding, adjusting belt tracking is simple, and the machine is nice and heavy. As I don’t have a planer, I like to use it to remove any scorching I get after ripping lumber (my TS blade needs a good cleaning) as opposed to my handheld belt sander, as I’m able to avoid rounding the edges when I use it.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

475 posts in 2212 days


#26 posted 02-12-2017 06:34 PM

So first off, I’m working under the assumption that you don’t have a belt sander already. With that assumption, I’ll add my vote for the Ridgid Spindle/Belt sander. I know it’s not really the question you asked, but it’s worth taking a look at.

The practical differences from the working spec viewpoint:
The Triton, Wen, etc go up to a 3 inch spindle size, but with the relatively low powered motors, I’m curious if people experience stalling with the large spindle.

The Ridgid only goes to a 2” spindle and I know I have occasionally stalled it if I get really aggressive. You can use the drive roller for the belt sander as a larger diameter spindle for some inside work.

The belt sander attachment for outside curves and flat work is hard to beat. If you don’t have a belt sander already, this would be a deciding point in my opinion. The angle stops on my table are dead on (checked with my Wixey digital angle gauge) and combining the tilted table with a miter gauge I’ve been able to do sneak up on some complex joinery for some small boxes I made.

So if you think you absolutely need the larger spindle, then go with the dedicated spindle sander. But if you even think you might want a belt sander one day, then I would seriously consider just going to the Ridgid.

For what its worth, I’m the second owner of a Ridgid sander that is at least 10 years old and I use it a lot with no issues, so I’ll give it an A rating for durability.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View Hermit's profile

Hermit

186 posts in 1323 days


#27 posted 02-15-2017 03:13 AM

I recently purchased a wood river brand oscillating spindle sander. I also purchased a rikon belt/disc sander. I looked hard at the ridged combo everyone’s talking about. The ridged was even mentioned as the top spindle sander in a magazine I bought a while back. I looked at it at home depot. Just my opinion but everything looked and felt cheap about it, especially the table top. I opted for a separate spindle/belt sander. After reading this post, I put the spindle sander to the test. I’m no small guy. I put all 240 lbs of me into the spindle sander and couldn’t get it to bog down. I tried several spindle sizes, with a dried 2×4 laying flat. No bog down whatsoever. Just my two cents but would recommend this.

-- I'm like the farmer's duck. If it don't rain, I'll walk.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3366 days


#28 posted 02-15-2017 05:39 AM


Btw, I look for a good deal on the ridgid from time to time. Looked these up today and thought it was really interesting that what looks like the same exact sander can be had with that kind of price difference—the Triton is 70% higher. I was curious if Triton specs theirs at a higher level.

- CharlesA

I was disappointed in the spindle sander portion of the rigid combo sander. The edge sander is great but the sanding sleeve on the spindle constantly slips so you really can t get much sanding done. The rubber drum is too hard, so you can t tighten it enough to deform it to put pressure on the sleeve to keep it from catching on the wood and stay in place while the rubber drum spins. Mine was really worthless so I just ended up getting an upright Grizzly.

I believe the Harbor freight version of the spindle sander has good reviews, so might be worth a try. If it doesn t work out, you can at least take it back easy enough.

- AZWoody

First time I ve heard that as a problem. Are you using the right washer on top?

- Woodchuck2010


he has the small stop washer from the bottom, on top.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1330 posts in 1222 days


#29 posted 02-16-2017 12:23 AM


Btw, I look for a good deal on the ridgid from time to time. Looked these up today and thought it was really interesting that what looks like the same exact sander can be had with that kind of price difference—the Triton is 70% higher. I was curious if Triton specs theirs at a higher level.

- CharlesA

I was disappointed in the spindle sander portion of the rigid combo sander. The edge sander is great but the sanding sleeve on the spindle constantly slips so you really can t get much sanding done. The rubber drum is too hard, so you can t tighten it enough to deform it to put pressure on the sleeve to keep it from catching on the wood and stay in place while the rubber drum spins. Mine was really worthless so I just ended up getting an upright Grizzly.

I believe the Harbor freight version of the spindle sander has good reviews, so might be worth a try. If it doesn t work out, you can at least take it back easy enough.

- AZWoody

First time I ve heard that as a problem. Are you using the right washer on top?

- Woodchuck2010

he has the small stop washer from the bottom, on top.

- papadan

Actually no but thanks for another worthless post on this forum. If I ever want to know how not to do something, I just read your advice.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2767 posts in 2294 days


#30 posted 02-16-2017 12:27 AM

I bought the Harbor Freight and when I got it home it was DOA. I took off the bottom to see if there was an obvious problem with a wire disconnected from the switch and I was underimpressed – the motor was dinky. I returned that and then I saw a lightly used JET on CL and bought that. Metal gears in an oil bath and a beefy motor makes it hopefully a lifetime tool.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5658 posts in 2811 days


#31 posted 02-16-2017 12:36 AM



So first off, I m working under the assumption that you don t have a belt sander already. With that assumption, I ll add my vote for the Ridgid Spindle/Belt sander. I know it s not really the question you asked, but it s worth taking a look at.

The practical differences from the working spec viewpoint:
The Triton, Wen, etc go up to a 3 inch spindle size, but with the relatively low powered motors, I m curious if people experience stalling with the large spindle.

The Ridgid only goes to a 2” spindle and I know I have occasionally stalled it if I get really aggressive. You can use the drive roller for the belt sander as a larger diameter spindle for some inside work.

The belt sander attachment for outside curves and flat work is hard to beat. If you don t have a belt sander already, this would be a deciding point in my opinion. The angle stops on my table are dead on (checked with my Wixey digital angle gauge) and combining the tilted table with a miter gauge I ve been able to do sneak up on some complex joinery for some small boxes I made.

So if you think you absolutely need the larger spindle, then go with the dedicated spindle sander. But if you even think you might want a belt sander one day, then I would seriously consider just going to the Ridgid.

For what its worth, I m the second owner of a Ridgid sander that is at least 10 years old and I use it a lot with no issues, so I ll give it an A rating for durability.

Mike

- MikeDS

Not to beat a dead horse, but the large end of the belt sander is 3” diameter on the Ridgid.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

475 posts in 2212 days


#32 posted 02-16-2017 01:42 PM

@pintodeluxe, thanks. I knew it was about that size, but I never bothered to measure it. I think you’d probably agree that given the position (working the back of the table) that it’s probably not equivalent to having a real 3” spindle, but I’ve used it fairly successfully on occasion.

On a side note, I put on my 2” rubber spindle and checked the OD and get between 1.973” to 1.976” along the length with nearly zero pressure on the caliper arms. Adding the large washer and cranking three full turns to tighten it brings the OD up to between 1.987” to 1.993” along the length. I could definitely add at least one more turn to tighten it further if needed.

i tried to find the thread where somebody posted the ID of the Diablo sleeves to cross check, but couldn’t find it this morning (though I didn’t look all that hard).

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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