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View gdshaw's profile

HELP I have a finish issue and need some advice please

by gdshaw
posted 01-31-2017 07:08 PM


17 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5621 posts in 3799 days


#1 posted 01-31-2017 07:16 PM

Welcome to Lumberjocks. It sounds like the Danish oil has not fully cured, cooler temperatures will slow down that process. It sounds like you did all the finishing and put it into service in a very short time, it may just need more time before eating waffles on it again :-)

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View gdshaw's profile

gdshaw

8 posts in 567 days


#2 posted 01-31-2017 08:08 PM

Thanks for the response Mark. Do you think there will be any issues removing the spots? I have not tried anything yet as it just happened this morn

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5011 posts in 4047 days


#3 posted 01-31-2017 08:22 PM

Waffles directly on the table?????
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

541 posts in 827 days


#4 posted 01-31-2017 08:29 PM



Waffles directly on the table?????
Bill

- Bill White

Bill,
I’ll thank you to keep your culinary criticisms to yourself. Some of us regular folk are a little too down to earth for high falutin nonsense like dishes and flatware :p

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View gdshaw's profile

gdshaw

8 posts in 567 days


#5 posted 01-31-2017 08:53 PM



Waffles directly on the table?????
Bill

- Bill White

Yes frozen waffles heated in the toaster. No syrup. Hectic in the morning, I’m doing pretty good just to get em fed. Spaghetti for dinner. Guess we should break out the plates

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2472 posts in 1931 days


#6 posted 01-31-2017 08:55 PM

I love Watco Danish oil and use it on most things I make, but I cover tops with Arm-R-Seal. I leave it bare on trim only. I think you are asking too much from it as a dinner table finish.

If you put a drop of water on it does it bead up and sit there or sort of soak in?

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View gdshaw's profile

gdshaw

8 posts in 567 days


#7 posted 01-31-2017 09:16 PM



I love Watco Danish oil and use it on most things I make, but I cover tops with Arm-R-Seal. I leave it bare on trim only. I think you are asking too much from it as a dinner table finish.

If you put a drop of water on it does it bead up and sit there or sort of soak in?

- RobS888

RobS888, I don’t know. I will check and see. Either way, what should I do if water does/does not bead?

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2472 posts in 1931 days


#8 posted 02-01-2017 04:29 AM

I love Watco Danish oil and use it on most things I make, but I cover tops with Arm-R-Seal. I leave it bare on trim only. I think you are asking too much from it as a dinner table finish.

If you put a drop of water on it does it bead up and sit there or sort of soak in?

- RobS888

RobS888, I don t know. I will check and see. Either way, what should I do if water does/does not bead?

- gdshaw


If it doesn’t sit on it then it isn’t sealed. I imagine other things could soak in and spoil. I don’t think Danish oil builds a film finish or at least not much of one and you really want a sealed surface for your table. Either way I would use arm-r-seal.

This is white oak with medium walnut Danish oil and several coats of satin arm-r-seal. I use a foam brush and it seems to level itself nicely.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View gdshaw's profile

gdshaw

8 posts in 567 days


#9 posted 02-01-2017 03:48 PM


I love Watco Danish oil and use it on most things I make, but I cover tops with Arm-R-Seal. I leave it bare on trim only. I think you are asking too much from it as a dinner table finish.

If you put a drop of water on it does it bead up and sit there or sort of soak in?

- RobS888

RobS888, I don t know. I will check and see. Either way, what should I do if water does/does not bead?

- gdshaw

If it doesn t sit on it then it isn t sealed. I imagine other things could soak in and spoil. I don t think Danish oil builds a film finish or at least not much of one and you really want a sealed surface for your table. Either way I would use arm-r-

This is white oak with medium walnut Danish oil and several coats of satin arm-r-seal. I use a foam brush and it seems to level itself nicely.

-RobS888
Thanks for the help. I was hoping I wouldn’t have to use anything else on the table, but I will let the table cure for several more days in my warm house and then I will consider Arm-r-seal if I am not satisfied with the oil finish.
From what I read with Arm-r-seal, it looks like it requires more careful application than merely wiping on like the oil. I would be most grateful if you would care to elaborate on how you prep/apply etc

- RobS888


View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1792 posts in 2076 days


#10 posted 02-01-2017 04:23 PM

Danish oil is insufficient for a dining table top, but no need to worry. Let the oil finish cure for a couple of weeks, use a table cloth when eating to keep stuff from absorbing into it. Then do what you did with the oil but use poly (arm r seal, minwax, it doesnt matter) thinned 1:1 with mineral spirits. To get a better film build, wipe it on but not off. For more film, only thin 10-20% and brush on. Good sponge brushes work well.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17564 posts in 3093 days


#11 posted 02-01-2017 04:55 PM

Don’t be intimidated by the arm r seal. IMO its one of the most forgiving finishes out there in terms of application. Another option, that’s not oil based (read a little stinky) is their high performance. Its water based. Both product level themselves very nicely. I like to apply one to two coats full strength with a brush and then the last few coats thinned, with a rag. But, like said above, Danish oil may take up to a week to cure and fully dry.

I know all about getting the kid fed before you head out the door. Anything you can manage to stuff down their throats is a good thing!

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View gdshaw's profile

gdshaw

8 posts in 567 days


#12 posted 02-01-2017 07:42 PM



Don t be intimidated by the arm r seal. IMO its one of the most forgiving finishes out there in terms of application. Another option, that s not oil based (read a little stinky) is their high performance. Its water based. Both product level themselves very nicely. I like to apply one to two coats full strength with a brush and then the last few coats thinned, with a rag. But, like said above, Danish oil may take up to a week to cure and fully dry.

I know all about getting the kid fed before you head out the door. Anything you can manage to stuff down their throats is a good thing!

- chrisstef

Thanks Chrisstef . And the water based high performance will work on top of the Danish oil?

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17564 posts in 3093 days


#13 posted 02-01-2017 07:46 PM

Doh. That didn’t equate in my tiny little brain for some reason. It might but I wouldn’t risk it. You could use a sealcoat of dewaxed shellac over the Danish oil and then the high performance on top of the shellac. I would go that route myself because I like shellac but its got a little learning curve to it. Stick to the oil based arm r seal.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4899 posts in 2437 days


#14 posted 02-01-2017 08:00 PM

The kids ate breakfast on it this morning and placed hot waffles directly on the table top

Yikes, next time give them Watco for syrup and they will refinish the table. Just kidding, don’t do that. Watco is not a very durable finish for a table top, especially if you have kids. Oil base poly is about the most durable finish out there and is what I would use in that situation. You’ll have get your finish room warmer though. You can put oil base right over the Watco after it cures for at least a week. I concur w/ OSU55’s advice.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2472 posts in 1931 days


#15 posted 02-01-2017 09:08 PM

I love Watco Danish oil and use it on most things I make, but I cover tops with Arm-R-Seal. I leave it bare on trim only. I think you are asking too much from it as a dinner table finish.

If you put a drop of water on it does it bead up and sit there or sort of soak in?

- RobS888

RobS888, I don t know. I will check and see. Either way, what should I do if water does/does not bead?

- gdshaw

If it doesn t sit on it then it isn t sealed. I imagine other things could soak in and spoil. I don t think Danish oil builds a film finish or at least not much of one and you really want a sealed surface for your table. Either way I would use arm-r-

This is white oak with medium walnut Danish oil and several coats of satin arm-r-seal. I use a foam brush and it seems to level itself nicely.

-RobS888
Thanks for the help. I was hoping I wouldn t have to use anything else on the table, but I will let the table cure for several more days in my warm house and then I will consider Arm-r-seal if I am not satisfied with the oil finish.
From what I read with Arm-r-seal, it looks like it requires more careful application than merely wiping on like the oil. I would be most grateful if you would care to elaborate on how you prep/apply etc

- gdshaw


I just use a foam brush and lay it on pretty thick. When the top is covered I run the brush very lightly and slowly at an angle (maybe 45 degrees, the brush is behind my hand ) on the surface. When you are applying, brush off the ends from a few inches in. This way you won’t get drips and build up on the edge. Keep running around the full edge to make sure none drops off. When I think it is fully applied I look at it from a couple angles to make sure I haven’t missed any spots or have streaks, then leave it alone for 12 hours or until the next day. Don’t laught, but I get close and sniff it to make sure it is ready for the next coat. Then I lightly sand with 600 grit. I blow off all the dust, then rub my hand on the piece to see if there is any dust left, then do it all again. The piece I showed had at least 6 coats on it. The last very light sanding is at 1,000 grit.

It really is easy to work with. I started with a pint or quart, but I’m on my second gallon jug now.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3403 posts in 2075 days


#16 posted 02-01-2017 09:29 PM

I use Danish Oil on a lot of projects and for me it takes awhile to dry. Certainly, at the temperatures you are at, it will take extra time.

View gdshaw's profile

gdshaw

8 posts in 567 days


#17 posted 02-01-2017 09:47 PM

I am very surprised, thrilled, and thankful for all the advice I have received from the respondents in this forum. Let this serve as a GIANT THANK YOU to everyone here. I have posted the same initial question to a few other outside experts and/or forums with depressingly minimal response. Looks like I need to give the table more time to dry, then work on finishing it with Arm-R-Seal. I will be happy to record before and after photos and update the forum in the future (likely a few weeks from now).

-Dale

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