LumberJocks

All Replies on FORREST SAW BLADES

  • Advertise with us
View MAS520's profile

FORREST SAW BLADES

by MAS520
posted 01-18-2017 08:48 PM


1 2 next »
53 replies

53 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8008 posts in 3371 days


#1 posted 01-18-2017 09:25 PM

Several – Infinity, Ridge Carbide, Tenryu Gold Medal, Freud Premier Fusion. I’ve heard others rave about Popular Tools and World’s Best too, but haven’t tried them. If you want even better performance, separate task specific blades will do an even better job within their respective cutting ranges.

Forrest makes really good blades, but are among the most expensive paths to that level of performance. After trying dozens, and comparing them directly, IMHO at current prices Forrest no longer holds a competitive advantage over some of the other top flight blades. They all use top grade micrograin carbide with very large teeth, high quality steel, precision manufacturing, excellent design, and outstanding sharpening….some even offer coatings to reduce rust, which Forrest does not. There is no fairy dust available to Forrest that’s not available to their competitors who choose to make a high quality blade, and is literally is more of a business decision than ability in this day and age.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

248 posts in 511 days


#2 posted 01-18-2017 09:36 PM

ive been very satisfied with freud and their price…considering infinity too though

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3444 posts in 3180 days


#3 posted 01-18-2017 09:41 PM

I got a ridge carbide and it’s great. Never tried a forrest, though.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5654 posts in 2809 days


#4 posted 01-18-2017 10:31 PM

I don’t want to say they are as good as or better than Forrest, but I like Freud industrial and Infinity blades.

Freud LU86R010 thin kerf is a fantastic bargain. I have absolutely no complaints with performance, and I demand a lot out of my blades. It seems to cut plywood and hardwood equally well.

I also have the Infinity Dadonator, which is a really nice set. Sadly, it is not recommended for use on my Sawstop.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Andre's profile

Andre

1829 posts in 1802 days


#5 posted 01-18-2017 10:39 PM

I picked up a Safety Rip Blade from L.V. a couple of years ago, believe it is a Dimar 10” 24 tooth Flat top, Amazing blade, still as sharp as the day I bought it and use for a lot more than just Ripping.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1564 posts in 3239 days


#6 posted 01-18-2017 11:05 PM

I’ve only had experience with the WW2 and the freud premier fusion. In my case i give the edge to the freud but both are Excellent and provide awesome results. And with Freud $30 +/- lees, they are evena better deal.
I have heard from customers that are extremely happy with Amana and Tenryu Gold blades too.

I’m also extremely happy with my Freud glue line rip. Really clean surface after a couple hundred feet of ripping 8/4 oak, mahogany and maple. No need to tune the shortage prior to gluing. Ripping 8/4 with a fusion in a pinch, takes too much effort, even witha 3hp saw. Which backs up knottscotts recommendation of specific blades for cutting chores.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3240 posts in 1984 days


#7 posted 01-18-2017 11:21 PM

I use Freud blades and recently got the Premier Fusion blade . It has an outstanding cut and I got it on sale for $61. For the money, it is very good.

I have thought a number of times about getting a Forrest but have not because of the cost. I have no doubt it is an excellent blade but the price is just too much for me.

I typically keep a Freud rip blade on my saw and swap out when doing fine cross cuts or better plywood.

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

707 posts in 854 days


#8 posted 01-18-2017 11:32 PM

My Freud cuts better than my Forrest.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5856 posts in 3190 days


#9 posted 01-19-2017 12:31 AM

My Forrest cuts better than anything else I have….!!

-- " At my age, happy hour is a crap and a nap".....

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1386 posts in 1794 days


#10 posted 01-19-2017 01:34 AM

Forrest all the way.They are made in he USA and if I have a problem with the blade I call them on the phone and talk.

Here’s a 12 inch I bought last year with a special bore and grind.
Not many makers offer specials.

Aj

-- Aj

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1200 posts in 3538 days


#11 posted 01-19-2017 02:04 AM

I’ve never had any luck with a Forrest blade so I stopped buying them. Maybe i just got bad blades and I’m certainly not going to talk down on them. I use Freud all the way now and have never encountered a problem with them.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View pontic's profile

pontic

583 posts in 604 days


#12 posted 01-19-2017 02:14 AM

Forrest man here. Like the way they cut cherry.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

539 posts in 1272 days


#13 posted 01-19-2017 02:56 AM

I just pushed the button about 15 minutes ago for a forrest FM-WW10406125 Forrest Woodworker-II 40T. Supposed to be a special grind and hard to get. Don’t really no anything about them. I’ve never paid that much for a saw blade. This one was 156.00, but they had it marked down and with a 10.00 coupon I got it for 114.00. Also it’s a full kerf what I’ve been looking for. Sure hope it works out.
Gerald

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6928 posts in 2594 days


#14 posted 01-19-2017 03:10 AM

I have a few Forrest blades, they hold an edge extremely well over the long run. Resharpening was easy thru their service. I feel like I got good value on them, the Frued rip blade I have is nice too. Probably not going to go wrong with any of the top of the line blades. They are all better long term values than the cheapos at the big box stores.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 898 days


#15 posted 01-19-2017 04:11 AM

I bought an amana blade a while back and i was very impressed with the cut quality and precision of the blade. any company that makes 14 inch industrial blades is alright with me.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8008 posts in 3371 days


#16 posted 01-19-2017 10:39 AM


I just pushed the button about 15 minutes ago for a forrest FM-WW10406125 Forrest Woodworker-II 40T. Supposed to be a special grind and hard to get. Don t really no anything about them. I ve never paid that much for a saw blade. This one was 156.00, but they had it marked down and with a 10.00 coupon I got it for 114.00. Also it s a full kerf what I ve been looking for. Sure hope it works out.
Gerald

- alittleoff

Just an FYI….this blade uses the traditional ATB grind combined with a flat raker every 5th tooth…it’s known as an ATB/R combination grind, which is the same grind that the Ridge Carbide TS2000 offers standard (made in the USA just down the road from Forrest, has even thicker carbide teeth, and gets sharpened to a finer grit – regular price is $99.95 w/free s/h). If you’ve never used a top shelf blade, you will likely be very happy with the Forrest, but in the end, it’s still a 40T blade intended to be good at most cuts, but weak in heavy ripping and fine ply/crosscuts. For efficient ripping without burning in thick dense materials an 18T to 24T FTG ripper is best. For really clean fine crosscuts and ply cuts, a 60T to 80T Hi-ATB is best.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Loren's profile

Loren

10381 posts in 3644 days


#17 posted 01-19-2017 11:03 AM

You can buy some other blades as mentioned
above and get similar performance.

Forrest will repair, sharpen and tune any blade
you send them, so if you want Forrest performance
send any decent blade into them for doctoring
and see what you think.

There’s no magic to the way the Woodworker 1
and 2 blades perform, just great quality control
after the teeth are brazed (at heat) to make sure
the blade ships flat.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

867 posts in 3079 days


#18 posted 01-19-2017 11:35 AM



Several – Infinity, Ridge Carbide, Tenryu Gold Medal, Freud Premier Fusion. I ve heard others rave about Popular Tools and World s Best too, but haven t tried them. If you want even better performance, separate task specific blades will do an even better job within their respective cutting ranges.

Forrest makes really good blades, but are among the most expensive paths to that level of performance. After trying dozens, and comparing them directly, IMHO at current prices Forrest no longer holds a competitive advantage over some of the other top flight blades. They all use top grade micrograin carbide with very large teeth, high quality steel, precision manufacturing, excellent design, and outstanding sharpening….some even offer coatings to reduce rust, which Forrest does not. There is no fairy dust available to Forrest that s not available to their competitors who choose to make a high quality blade, and is literally is more of a business decision than ability in this day and age.

- knotscott


Couldn’t have said it any better!

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 507 days


#19 posted 01-19-2017 11:46 AM

My saw has a horse-and-a-half motor. I have a Forrest blade that I use occasionally, but for that much power, I prefer Freud thin-kerf blades. I was concerned at first about them deflecting some since they’re so thin, but that doesn’t seem to be a problem. The Freud blades cut hardwood pretty well with minimum burning on my underpowered saw.

What I miss about using those blades, though, is the sharpening service Forrest provides. I could throw the blade in their box with a check, and it comes back sharp.

-- David

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4984 posts in 2489 days


#20 posted 01-19-2017 12:02 PM

Knotscott knows his stuff, and my experience agrees with what he and some of the others said. I have Forrest, Ridge Carbide and Freud blades. The last 2 cut just as well as the first.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

812 posts in 3061 days


#21 posted 01-19-2017 02:11 PM

I have tried many other combination blades for my 3 hp table saw, and since I went with Forrest, I have used them exclusively, except when doing a LOT of ripping, and then I use a Freud, glue line rip blade. I bought the original Freud thin kerf when I bought a Systematic combo blade a long time ago and was using a 1.5 hp saw; and finally just recently replaced it with the full kerf model. A great blade! I have a 12” Tenyru blade in my miter saw that was given to me as a present. I am very pleased with the performance and how long that it has stayed sharp. Another very good blade.
But for a 10” everyday combo blade, my vote is still overwhelmingly for Forrest. They are American made, have a great sharpening service and like another member said, if you have a problem, you can call them and talk. I had a shipping problem and talked to one of the Forrest family, and he solved the problem very quickly and to my satisfaction. Just my 2 cents. Good Luck, Work Safely and Have Fun!

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2010 posts in 1218 days


#22 posted 01-19-2017 02:46 PM

I used Forrest and Freud. The Forrest blades are my “go-to” choice for end grain cutting that will be exposed (easier sanding cleanup). They are often on sale for around $100 (WW2, 40T and 48T). If I’m not especially concerned about the finish of the cut, I’ll just use whatever blade I have installed.

My Freud box-joint blade is excellent, very precise and flat cuts. Their “super dado” is also excellent. Forrest makes these blades as well, but I have not tried them.

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

248 posts in 511 days


#23 posted 01-19-2017 02:48 PM

I was in a bind last night waiting for a new ripping freud and saw a diablo 24 tooth at ace right across from my state farm agency….I am very impressed with the sharpness and quietness of this blade. has anyone else tried it for 28 bucks?!

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

3819 posts in 708 days


#24 posted 01-19-2017 04:53 PM

I love my freud Glue Line Rip Blade
http://www.rockler.com/freud-lm74r-industrial-glue-line-rip-saw-blades
not a bad price either …... :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8008 posts in 3371 days


#25 posted 01-19-2017 05:42 PM



I was in a bind last night waiting for a new ripping freud and saw a diablo 24 tooth at ace right across from my state farm agency….I am very impressed with the sharpness and quietness of this blade. has anyone else tried it for 28 bucks?!

- buckbuster31

The Freud Diablo and Irwin Marples series are well regarded for good value. Though both have limited selection, and are mainly thin kerf.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 898 days


#26 posted 01-19-2017 05:46 PM

Also some of the new diablo blades are being made in china, and the quality for value is just not there. the carbide is as brittle as baby teeth.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8008 posts in 3371 days


#27 posted 01-19-2017 05:53 PM



Also some of the new diablo blades are being made in china, and the quality for value is just not there. the carbide is as brittle as baby teeth.

- DirtyMike

Good call….get the ones made in Italy.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View BenjaminNY's profile

BenjaminNY

130 posts in 1398 days


#28 posted 01-19-2017 07:19 PM

I think for the money it is hard to beat the Freud Premier fusion. I have the thin kerf version and it leaves a glass smooth finish.

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

248 posts in 511 days


#29 posted 01-19-2017 07:32 PM

the diablo I bought said made in Italy?

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

639 posts in 2142 days


#30 posted 01-19-2017 07:36 PM

The Freud Diablos I’ve bought at HD all say made in Italy…

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 898 days


#31 posted 01-19-2017 07:39 PM

since I have been into woodworking Forrest blades has been the “best” blades. I would love to see a comparison between Forrest, Infinity, Tenryu, Amana, Frued Etc. Throw in an oshlun for a control.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

929 posts in 491 days


#32 posted 01-19-2017 09:42 PM

I have other brands, but if you look at my equipment you will find only Forrest blades installed. the others are just taking up space at this point.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8008 posts in 3371 days


#33 posted 01-19-2017 09:50 PM

since I have been into woodworking Forrest blades has been the “best” blades. I would love to see a comparison between Forrest, Infinity, Tenryu, Amana, Frued Etc. Throw in an oshlun for a control.

- DirtyMike

I’ve done non-published, unsanctioned comparisons between all those blades in as controlled a fashion as I know how. You’ll be hard pressed to tell the difference between cuts from a WWII 40T, TS2000, and Tenryu Gold Medal. None of them is clearly superior in every way….they all have fairly predictable strengths and weaknesses. None of them will rip as efficiently as the dedicated rip blades, or crosscut as cleanly as the dedicated crosscut blades from the same manufacturers. They’re intended to be jacks of all trades, and by design, suffer in the more extreme regions of thick ripping and ultrafine cuts. For you neanders out there, it’s a lot like comparing a jack plane to a dedicated smoother or dedicated jointer plane.

The Infinity Super General and Freud Fusion are similar designs (dual side grind with very tight side clearances and a steep 30° Hi-ATB top bevel, and were basically in a class by themselves as far as general purpose blades went for highly polished edges on rip cuts of moderate thickness and fine crosscuts, until Forrest introduced the WWII 48T….the downside of all those 3 blades is an increased chance of burning in thicker materials, behaving a bit more like a dedicated crosscut blade. The downside of the 40T WII, TS2000, and Gold Medal is more tearout on fine crosscuts and plywood, and a less polished edge on rip cuts, but all three could rip thicker materials than the 48T WWII, Super General, and Fusion with less burning. A- to A+ across the board for all these if used within their intended applications. Wood Mag did a very similar comparison with very similar findings a few years back.

The Oshlun blades I’ve tried (40T and 50T) are good value, but did’t exhibit quite the degree of finish, polish, or precision….B+ to A-. For less money, the top value in a general purpose blade in my book remains the Delta 35-7657 40T ATB…made in the USA, large C4 micrograin carbide, laser cut expansion slots, high grade steel, precision manfacturing, and is on closeout for ~ $30 shipped…..B+ to A- performance for $30 leaves budget for wood, a dedicated rip blade, or a decent 60T to 80T crosscut/plywood blade.

The Amana Prestige 40T that I tried rated slightly below the Fusion, Super General, WWII, TS2000, or Gold Medal, and wasn’t as good a value as the Delta. The Amana Tools 50T ATB/R combo blade had some of the largest carbide I’ve seen on any blade…it’s solid choice as an every day general purpose type blade, but did leave more saw marks and tearout than the others, however it was still plenty capable of leaving glue ready edges, is pretty forgiving of the saw’s setup, and should withstand more re-sharpenings than any other blade, which still makes it a decent daily driver for < $70 in the long run.

All of the above is just my 2 cents based on hours of comparison testing in a home shop. Everyone’s needs and habits are different. A blade the cuts cleanly in testing may not be a great choice for high volume commercial settings where edge life is more important than lack of saw marks. In fact, the tight side clearances that give many of these 40T general purpose blades their ability to leave highly polished edges will also cause more friction, and would undoubtedly dull quickly in an operation that runs their blades nearly continuously….professional and hobbyist needs and applications are very different.

With all of that said, I refer back to the comment about a general purpose or combo blades being much like a #5 jack plane. If you’re not a hand plane guy, maybe a tire analogy will help paint the picture – think of all season radials as general purpose blades, mud & snow tires as bulk rip blades, and racing slicks as fine crosscut/ply blades. If you’re going to use one blade, 40T to 50T are the sweet spot for many common tasks, but don’t think for a minute that they’ll outperform task specific blades in their respective areas of expertise, which is why I question the wisdom of blowing an entire blade budget on one all purpose blade that doesn’t really cover the whole cutting spectrum. If you’re after better performance, get the right blade for the job.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2010 posts in 1218 days


#34 posted 01-20-2017 03:21 PM

One thing I have noticed with blades that have a shallow side grind (like the WWIIs) is they will build up pitch on the sides faster than other blades. This eventually causes burning and must be cleaned off regularly. This side grind is a big part of what leaves a glass-smooth crosscut so no free lunch.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1386 posts in 1794 days


#35 posted 01-20-2017 06:03 PM


One thing I have noticed with blades that have a shallow side grind (like the WWIIs) is they will build up pitch on the sides faster than other blades. This eventually causes burning and must be cleaned off regularly. This side grind is a big part of what leaves a glass-smooth crosscut so no free lunch.

This is not true for me.Maybe this depends on what wood your cutting.I havent cleaned my blade since Christmas.
And it’s pretty darn good.
I liked what Knotscott wrote it’s a very good post.

Aj

-- Aj

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2010 posts in 1218 days


#36 posted 01-21-2017 03:37 PM


This is not true for me.Maybe this depends on what wood your cutting.I havent cleaned my blade since Christmas.
And it s pretty darn good.
I liked what Knotscott wrote it s a very good post.

Aj

- Aj2

+1 to Knotscott!

You are correct, the wood has a lot to do with it. The oak I’ve been cutting has not left any pitch on the original “Delta” brand combo blade that came with my Unisaw. I used this blade to crosscut some pieces to rough length, then swapped in my WW to cut them to length. There was the typical dark patch just behind the cutting edge on the WW teeth after maybe 50 cuts. It never gets bigger, but if I now cut some “sensitive” wood like cherry, the WW will leave slight burn marks (until I clean the blade).

For some woods, I can cut for weeks without any build up, then if I cut some other wood, the build up begins. I rarely ever see build up on my original blade (which cuts surprisingly well, but certainly not WW quality).

My Freud blades also gunk up with the same woods that befuddle the WW, although not quite as quickly.

Anyway, just an observation.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

790 posts in 1580 days


#37 posted 01-21-2017 05:27 PM

I’ve been happy with Frued blades.
One thing that is in their favor is ready availability in numerous places in my city, Houston.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

516 posts in 1610 days


#38 posted 01-21-2017 05:34 PM

I used to use the Freud Fusion and went to Forrest to try them out. Forrest is clearly better and lasts longer. However the Fusion is a damn good blade for the money. Usually about $30 less than the Forrest.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View endgrainy's profile

endgrainy

251 posts in 1884 days


#39 posted 01-21-2017 05:54 PM

I may have missed it being mentioned above, but Forrest offers sharpening for any brand of carbide tipped saw blade (as well as other blades and bits) so no need to select brand based on sharpening availability.

http://www.forrestblades.com/pdf/forrest-sharpening-service-form.pdf

I have two Forrest WW2 blades that I rotate on my tablesaw and alternate sending out for sharpening. They work very well, but I haven’t had a lot of experience with the other blades mentioned above.

-- Follow me on Instagram @endgrainy

View boatz's profile

boatz

92 posts in 1647 days


#40 posted 01-21-2017 09:55 PM

I use Forrest blades. The cartridge on my Sawstop fired and grabbed my blade.

I was able to send it back to Forrest to repair and re sharpen for much less than a new one

-- You can't always get what you want. But if you try sometimes you just might find, you'll get what you need

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

653 posts in 3317 days


#41 posted 01-22-2017 12:07 AM

Forrest has no magic bullet and if you compare exact apples Freud, Tenryu, Ridge, Infinity etc produce equal results. I have about a dozen Forrest blades and they all perform well but I could just as easily pull out one of my Freud Industrial or Tenryu blades and get the same results. In the same way Forrest doesn’t have any magic pixie dust in the sharpening department, there are plenty of high-tech sharpening services that are as good or better, my favorite is Cook’s in Texas but Ridge is also very good.

There hasn’t been any discussion of blades you will actually see in larger commercial shops. Leitz, FS Tool, Royce Ayr and Matsushita are just some of the true premium blades available and most of them are more expensive than Forrest.

Saws tend to be like most tooling, everyone has their favorite and the cumulative experience rarely agrees upon one being the best, a lot of this has to do with different expectations, experience levels and the wide variation in the material we use. My personal opinion is over time try as many saw manufacturers as you can as well as as many grinds as you can and develop your own feel. The obvious problem there is many hobbyists don’t actually wear out many blades over their lifetime if they buy quality and care for them properly.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4764 posts in 3239 days


#42 posted 01-22-2017 01:45 AM

Forrest blades cut clean out of the box because of the grade of carbide they use and sharpening. Other blades can cut just as well if sharpened before use. I am fortunate to have a carbide blade sharpener (Foley) and I can put a fine finish on any blade (even one from HF) and match Forrest performance. I have 2 Forrest blades, but I can’t afford any more, so I have gone with cheaper blades, like Freud and Dewalt. I look for blades that have lots of carbide

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1386 posts in 1794 days


#43 posted 01-22-2017 03:15 AM



I use Forrest blades. The cartridge on my Sawstop fired and grabbed my blade.

I was able to send it back to Forrest to repair and re sharpen for much less than a new one.

Oh that’s a bummer I’m glad Forrest was able to fix your blade and put the magic dust back :)

Aj

-- Aj

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

860 posts in 1535 days


#44 posted 01-22-2017 03:32 AM

I have an infinity miter saw blade and that thing slices everything like butter. I currently have a Bosch thin kerf in my TS, but I’m not really satisfied with it and am thinking of another Infinity blade or maybe a Forrest if it goes on sale. Been seeing some go on sale through a Lightning Deal on Amazon lately.

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

539 posts in 1272 days


#45 posted 01-22-2017 04:12 AM



I just pushed the button about 15 minutes ago for a forrest FM-WW10406125 Forrest Woodworker-II 40T. Supposed to be a special grind and hard to get. Don t really no anything about them. I ve never paid that much for a saw blade. This one was 156.00, but they had it marked down and with a 10.00 coupon I got it for 114.00. Also it s a full kerf what I ve been looking for. Sure hope it works out.
Gerald

- alittleoff


I received this blade today and rushed to the shop to try it out since I had just read this post a day ago. I had a 80 tooth frued on the saw using it for cutting black walnut trim. After trying the 40 tooth WWII on several cross cuts and ripping a few peices of oak I have to say it’s a great blade. Does it cut better than a 80t frued? No. Is the ripping better? Yes. I’ve used the frued for a while, but it is like new. I didn’t have a 40T frued to try but I bet it would cut just as well as the forest. I really bought this blade because I wanted an 1/8 in. Kerf, a blade that was true and a combo blade. How long it last will also mean a lot due to the cost, but I’ll have to wait and see. I think both company’s makes very good blades and wouldn’t hesitate to buy either.
Gerald

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8189 posts in 2573 days


#46 posted 01-22-2017 01:36 PM

http://www.infinitytools.com/saw-blades-accessories/table-saw/table-saw-blades/table-saw-blade-packages/2-pc-10-essential-saw-blade-package-4374

A couple of great saw blades for a hundred dollars is money well spent.

I have the combo blade and it works well. You get a lot of good carbide for your money.

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

516 posts in 1610 days


#47 posted 01-22-2017 02:21 PM



I use Forrest blades. The cartridge on my Sawstop fired and grabbed my blade.

I was able to send it back to Forrest to repair and re sharpen for much less than a new one

- boatz

I’m going to assume you did something to trigger the safety feature so I’m glad it worked as promised and you didn’t lose any digits.

I’ve had two firings while I’ve had my sawstop. The first one was accidental when I let the aluminum miter gauge make contact with the blade. I was told Sawstop would help me out but when I called, they said too many people were doing that and they could no longer replace the cartridges.

The second one was when I almost cut my finger off and the safety system saved me from a hospital trip. I did call Freud in both cases but they said they do not have any program to fix or replace blades that have been used in a sawstop.

I’ve been told that you don’t even want to re-sharpen a blade like that. The explosion is so violent it can knock them out of round and flat.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2010 posts in 1218 days


#48 posted 01-22-2017 03:19 PM

One thing to consider is many of us “weekend warriors” never get enough saw time to actually wear out blades fast enough and actually get the opportunity to try out a variety of brands. I currently have about 8 different blades, each with a more or less dedicated purpose. When one does finally bite the dust, I’ll probably go with what I know.

View boatz's profile

boatz

92 posts in 1647 days


#49 posted 01-22-2017 03:40 PM

JimRochester
Yes like you I touched the blade with my Incra miter gauge
One question- how did you copy and paste my post into your reply?

-- You can't always get what you want. But if you try sometimes you just might find, you'll get what you need

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

516 posts in 1610 days


#50 posted 01-22-2017 04:20 PM

Bottom right hand corner is a quote button.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

1 2 next »
53 replies


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com