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View BryanFaz's profile

Barn wood identification

by BryanFaz
posted 01-12-2017 12:55 AM


28 replies so far

View tomd's profile

tomd

2167 posts in 3916 days


#1 posted 01-12-2017 01:16 AM

I would guess oak.

-- Tom D

View BryanFaz's profile

BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#2 posted 01-12-2017 01:26 AM

We live in Western Kentucky…oak is quite prevalent here.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

819 posts in 697 days


#3 posted 01-12-2017 01:30 AM

Looks lik white oak to me. I don’t know why some of the grain is so “dark” unless it’s just where it is really old an mayb portions were penitrated by water for many years. Either way it look awesome

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#4 posted 01-12-2017 01:46 AM

Thank you JCamp…very kind. I can’t take much credit…I had a close friend oversee the entire project. But I’m pretty good at taking a barn down now. And I am very proud of the bar top and cabinets.

The picture may not show it, but, the wood is fairly tight grained. We had quite a bit of oak in the other part of the project…installing barn wood wainscoting throughout the basement. There was quite a difference between the planed oak and the bar top/cabinet wood (planed). I may have to try and find a piece of this wood that isn’t finished and take a picture…if I have any of it left. Again…it’s been 11 years.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5917 posts in 2412 days


#5 posted 01-12-2017 02:07 AM

I would for you to post the whole project. What I see is amazing. I have agree about oak. It looks fantastic!

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#6 posted 01-12-2017 02:19 AM

Thank you BurlyBob. The cabinets and bar top were the only pieces of barn wood that we planed…and they came from one barn. Most of the boards were rather wide. Some 15” wide…rather unusual. I will take a few more pics, including the wainscoting, and post tomorrow. Appreciate the interest.

View wunderaa's profile

wunderaa

248 posts in 2349 days


#7 posted 01-12-2017 03:50 AM

First thought was oak. Many sections show what appears to be wind shake damage where some of the texture shows through. Beautiful.

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#8 posted 01-12-2017 11:26 PM

Just now back online. Wow…did I make a mistake. I talked to my friend who oversaw this project…the real woodworker. And he reminded me that the rails and stiles ARE made from old oak barn wood. I totally forgot. the wood we couldn’t identify is the panels in the doors, and, the bar top. This wood is a soft wood, closed grain. I am so sorry for the confusion. I will try and find a piece of it unfinished…maybe that will help. Or, perhaps I can take an even closer picture of the panels. Thanks again for the comments!!!!

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

828 posts in 1365 days


#9 posted 01-13-2017 07:53 PM

I cant help identifying the bar top wood, but that is one awesome bartop! I think a few of us would like to see more pictures of the whole bar as the doors are pretty wicked,too.

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#10 posted 01-13-2017 08:01 PM

Once again thank you for your kind words. I’ve been trying to find a piece or cutoff of the wood we used…and am striking out. I will take pics of the entire bar…and a few of the wainscoting tonight. And some close ups of the bar top and door panels. Thanks again to everyone for your interest.

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#11 posted 01-13-2017 11:39 PM

Ok…let’s try this again. Here are pics of entire project which includes the entire bar, cabinet door panels and sections (grain), bar top…and, pics of the wainscoting including column wrap. I will try to insert these with description(s).

These first 4 pics are of the front, side and top of the bar.

These next two are of the bar top…hopefully showing the closed grain.

The next three are pics of the cabinets.

The next three are front pics of a door panel…with two closeups of the grain.

These next four are pics of the rear of panel doors with a better display of the wood grain.

And, finally (ha), here are three pictures of the wainscoting.

Please allow me to reiterate…the mystery we are trying to solve is what is the barn wood on the bar top, and the cabinet door panels (and its the same wood). The rails and styles are oak (barn wood). The bar top and panels can be described as closed grain, and a soft wood. We live in Western Kentucky by the way.

Enjoy, thank you, and God Bless!!!!

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

819 posts in 697 days


#12 posted 01-13-2017 11:52 PM

That’s just an amazing project. I’m drooling a little. Lol. Anyway. Is there a chance that the wood that is in question could b pine? It doesn’t have the knots like a lot of pine now has but u said there were some pretty wide boards so mayb the trees back when the barn was built were allowed to mature longer than the trees are now. Any idea how old the barn was? Also u wouldn’t happen to hav a piece that’s been planed down but not stained would u?

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#13 posted 01-14-2017 12:11 AM

Thanks JCamp! I have searched my wood bins and haven’t yet been able to find a piece of that wood. but i’m still looking. I do know where the old barn is…and it’s somehow still standing. If I have to I’ll go get a board…and hope barn doesn’t fall on me. HA. And…there is a resemblance of this wood to pine. Especially the grain and hardness/softness character.

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JCamp

819 posts in 697 days


#14 posted 01-14-2017 01:15 AM

When I bought my place there was an old 26×36 barn. It was to far gone for repair so I tore the roof an trusses off. The posts that were in the ground had rotted off at the ground. I figured if I took all the board an batton siding off it would just fall down. Well it didn’t. As a matter of fact I about never got it pulled down even with my truck. Lol. Old timers knew how to build stuff

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#15 posted 01-14-2017 01:42 AM

I don’t doubt that a bit. I had a nearly identical experience with the barn that was “given” to me to strip for the wainscoting, and, take down when done. I had to chainsaw the corner legs…then pull it over/down. It was fun. BTW, the bar top/cabinet panel wood also exhibited some similarities to poplar…grain, hardness, etc. I had some poplar boards in the main barn…but the wood in question was slightly different. Naturally, 11 years later I can’t put my finger on what they were. Sure wish I had done this 11 years ago. Still looking for unfinished boards. :)

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JCamp

819 posts in 697 days


#16 posted 01-14-2017 01:49 AM

I hav very limited experience with poplar but it seems lik poplar tends to hav a green tint to it. To me the grain looks a lot lik the quarter sawn in this picture

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#17 posted 01-14-2017 01:56 PM

JCamp…please forgive me. I thought I posted a response last night…but I don’t see it here. It sure appears that you are dead on with the quarter sawn pine. A little additional background, the friend that designed this entire project is an experienced and talented woodworker. The evidence of his skill is in the final product. And he absolutely saved me from wasting an entire barn of wood as I was about to start cutting and screwing boards on the wall (for the wainscoting…the bar was constructed at the end of the project). It may surprise some, he had never worked with barn wood. We didn’t plane a single piece of barn wood until we had finished installing the wainscoting in the main rec room (roughly 2000 sq feet) and my office (roughly 400 s.f.). This was my first woodworking project…ever. My friend was however familiar with wood identification. He attempted to ID the wood by examining a slice of the end grain with a hand lens. But the cells under the hand lens simply didn’t resemble any wood that he was familiar with. I am embarrassed that I don’t have a single board of this wood in my shop. But, again, I know where to find a board if I have to. I didn’t want you to think that we didn’t make every effort to ID the wood during the project. We just weren’t able to…and, it’s been 11 years. Thanks for your time and assistance!!!

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#18 posted 01-15-2017 12:29 AM

Hello again JCamp…and friends. I “think” I found a planed, but unfinished, board…like the cabinet panels/bar top. When I get home later I’ll take pics. Any requested angles please advise. Thanks guys!!!

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

819 posts in 697 days


#19 posted 01-15-2017 09:40 PM

Probably just a pic of the end grain and another of the face of the board

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#20 posted 01-16-2017 02:06 AM

Good evening!! We are 99.9% sure this board is from the same group of boards as the bar top/cabinet door panels. I had started a relief carving on the other side of the board awhile back…and, of course, forgot about it.

So, here are two pics of both the face of the board, and the end grain. I lighly sanded and cleaned the surface.

Thanks again…and please let me know if i need to do anything different to the board.

God Bless!!!!

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1778 posts in 2622 days


#21 posted 01-16-2017 12:52 PM

The board is maple.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#22 posted 01-16-2017 12:56 PM

Good morning Danny!! Thank you for reviewing my pics. The main reason we didn’t think it was maple was due to its hardness…or lack thereof. It’s a relatively soft wood. I’m not a carver…but i had started a relief carving on the other side of this board. And it was easy to carve…from a hardness standpoint. Just wanted to mention that. Thanks again!!!!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6290 posts in 1285 days


#23 posted 01-16-2017 01:04 PM

I’m a little late to this party but I’m pretty stumped. That last board does indeed look to be Maple. There are many varieties of Maple, some quite soft. However the first pics look to be definitively White Oak, which is a much better choice for a barn. Then somewhere in the middle, it does look like QS heart pine. Are you sure that all the boards are the same? When building a barn way back when, they would have just used whatever was on-hand.

Also, you have A LOT of pet ducks. And some gorgeous cabinets and bar!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View BryanFaz's profile

BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#24 posted 01-16-2017 01:14 PM

Well…I sincerely apologize for the confusion. Quick summary. I am trying to identify the barn wood we used for my bar top, and, cabinet door panels (only). This project was completed in 2004. I initially posted pics of the bar, and the cabinet doors…including end grain of the stiles of my cabinet doors. I had forgotten, until reminded, that the rails and stiles were actually made from oak barn wood boards. Oak is very easy to identify, generally. My second round of posted pics were of the entire project (wainscoting, etc.)...including the backs of the door panels. Then, I finally found a single board that I had done some relief carving on…and we are fairly certain this is from the same barn and boards that the bar top and cabinet door panels were built from. As mentioned, this last board I sanded lightly. I hope that helps…and again apologize for the confusion.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5877 posts in 2357 days


#25 posted 01-16-2017 02:16 PM

I agree that the last pic looks like maple of some kind. While woodworkers are used to sugar maple, AKA hard maple, and it’s density, there are many varieties that are relatively soft. I’ve got some silver maple, for instance, that you can easily dent with a fingernail.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#26 posted 01-16-2017 02:31 PM

That is how I would describe the hardness…I can dent it with a fingernail.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

819 posts in 697 days


#27 posted 01-16-2017 10:29 PM

I showed ur pics to a buddy that grades lumber for a living. He said what ken and jay said. It’s soft maple. He said the black dots r worm holes and the streaks r from them too. I’ve never heard of soft maple till now but from ur project pics it looks lik it finished nicely

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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BryanFaz

58 posts in 646 days


#28 posted 01-17-2017 02:14 AM

Good evening JCamp! Well, it sounds like its unanimous…soft maple.

I can’t thank all of you enough for putting an end to this mystery. And thanks for the comments about the cabinets and bar top.

I look forward to participating in future forums with you guys.

God Bless!!!!

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