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The End of an Old Friend

by papadan
posted 01-05-2017 04:15 PM


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57 replies

57 replies so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4173 posts in 3161 days


#1 posted 01-05-2017 05:31 PM

I’m with you, Dan. I still have a bunch of Sears Craftsman tools from decades ago and some more recent that don’t wanna die. Not to mention my Craftsman RAS that I bought new in 1970. It got some heavy use and abuse, but still performs well and is the most used power saw in the shop to this day. That’s 46 years of one person ownership with no major maintenance required. I did replace the power switch, and made a new, larger table top. I still have the vinyl covered original manual, with no cracks or evident wear in the cover.

I bought a medium size Craftsman machinist vice in 1970 that was used for over 35 years. I replaced it with a larger Craftsman vice just a few years ago. I also have a Craftsman laser distance measuring device and a number of different wrench and socket sets.

A couple of years ago I went to Lowes and bought a Kobalt (Lowes brand) set of small pliers, nippers, and needle nose for my vacation home shop. Upon opening the package, I found the quality abysmal, the jaws not even meeting each other. I took them back the same day. So when I returned them, I looked further at Lowes, and couldn’t find a good alternative. Went to Sears, and immediately found what I needed. The price was nearly identical, but the Craftsman set was in a whole different quality realm, with well finished precision made tools.

...and I really like their packaging of nail gun nails, much better than the alternatives.

I don’t know what they are going to do with the brand, but I hope they continue to make value tools that one can afford that will still perform well.

Happy New Year to you and yours…

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4127 posts in 2305 days


#2 posted 01-05-2017 05:37 PM

Oh horse poop! I didn’t buy many tools there but I did like the mechanic tools.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View UncannyValleyWoods's profile

UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1860 days


#3 posted 01-05-2017 05:39 PM

I for one blame electro-magnets.

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

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waho6o9

8189 posts in 2573 days


#4 posted 01-05-2017 05:43 PM

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5112 posts in 1717 days


#5 posted 01-05-2017 05:51 PM

The service surrounding craftsman’s hand tools has gone downhill significantly in my area at least. Black & Decker assuming the brand is very likely not a good thing from a quality or service standpoint, I sincerely hope I’m wrong but time will tell.

View lew's profile

lew

12056 posts in 3752 days


#6 posted 01-05-2017 05:52 PM

Well it was bound to happen.

Since the education system no longer feels it is important to continue to have vocational/shop classes there will no longer be anyone who knows what makes a quality tool or how to use them.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View ric53's profile

ric53

194 posts in 1516 days


#7 posted 01-05-2017 06:05 PM

I believe B&D manufactured the Craftsman power tools for some time now and put the craftsman name & logo on them. I’ve never been a fan of craftsman power tools.

-- Ric, Mazomanie

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

563 posts in 547 days


#8 posted 01-05-2017 06:09 PM

On the glass half full side of things….. this might not b a bad thing. As already stated the old craftsman tools were better than the new ones. If Stanley (B&D parent company) keeps them made in the USA an continues the lifetime (without receipt) warranty it might b better. Sears cut quality to make more money. Stanley ain’t hurting for money right now. Plus they’ll b able to sell Craftsman almost anywhere now. Walmart lowes an Home Depot will likely hav them. Also since they r uncertain of the USA trade deals with other countries (thank u Trump) stanley has said they’d b opening a $35 million manufacturing plant. That should help with jobs

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View moke's profile

moke

1175 posts in 2773 days


#9 posted 01-05-2017 06:34 PM

I’m with JCamp..
It might be a good thing…..there power tools were made by a bunch of different people anyway…Ryobi, and Rikon being the two big players. Craftsman made a deal a few years back anyway to sell in other stores….I saw them in an Ace Hardware last year. In this article ( I can’t remember where I saw it or I would reference it ), it referenced it wanted to expand manufacturing and keep it in the States…..and it is no secret that Sears has been struggling for years and is closing stores….maybe this infusion of cash will perk them up…at least for while.

While we have seen some mergers that did not work out well for us as wood workers….ie Delta….maybe this one will…the article also did not say the Craftsman was leaving the Sears Market..that would be an incredilble marketing mistake! B&D is a pretty successful company, why would they dump Craftsman after paying 2 Billion for it?
Let’s hope for the best.
Just my .02
Mike

-- Mike

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4173 posts in 3161 days


#10 posted 01-05-2017 06:38 PM

Regarding Craftsman power tools, my RAS is the only Craftsman power tool I have purchased. I was not overly impressed by the looks of their oriental imports in latter years. Delta was my goto brand for many years in that realm. Unfortunately, none of the brands seem to remain at the same level of quality over the years.

I also bemoaned the degradation of the Sears service over the years. I would buy some Sears products just because of their service. I think many companies look at various parts of their business and evaluate each on the basis of profitability in isolation from any other consideration. But service will always be hard to make profitable, but may serve as an important consideration in customer loyalty and satisfaction. Making the bottom line look great each quarter at the expense of long term success is all too common in the current business world.

Systematic quality oriented business and manufacturing, in spite of the tremendous contributions from the USA in the field by W.E. Deming, was first adopted by Japan. They adopted Deming’s teachings, which many feel led to the astounding rise of Japan from the ashes of war to become the second largest economy in the world by 1960, or thereabouts. Many American companies still haven’t figured it out.

It will be interesting to see what happens with the Craftsman brand. I am pessimistic…

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View OSB's profile

OSB

147 posts in 522 days


#11 posted 01-05-2017 06:39 PM

I believe most Craftsman tools are already made in Asia.

They are rapidly approaching the quality of Harbor Freight tools.

I have never been terribly impressed with B&D so that is no improvement.

If you have a 40 year old made in USA Craftsman ratchet that finally breaks, it will be replaced with the new type which probably won’t last 40 years and the “Unconditional Lifetime Warranty” will probably break before that.

It looks like I will continue buying my tools used from garage sales, thrift stores, eBay and Craigslist with some Harbor Freight when disposable is OK.

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

481 posts in 2954 days


#12 posted 01-05-2017 06:55 PM

Craftsman has long (always?) been a house brand name draped over others’ products si begs the question: what really is being lost here? Nostalgia will be the biggest casualty. All of this heartless objectivism aside: I’m bummed that an old favorite brand (such as it was) will now salute a different flag and likely lose the cachet that long drew me to their tools.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4127 posts in 2305 days


#13 posted 01-05-2017 06:58 PM

Can anyone think of a tool company that sold out to another tool company and the new owner upped the tool quality??

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View HickWillis's profile

HickWillis

114 posts in 656 days


#14 posted 01-05-2017 07:08 PM



Can anyone think of a tool company that sold out to another tool company and the new owner upped the tool quality??

- AlaskaGuy

Only one comes to mind…when Thomas Lie-Nielsen bought the tooling from Garrett Wade for the #95 Stanley block plane adaption they were making.

-- -Will

View GAwoodworker's profile

GAwoodworker

36 posts in 765 days


#15 posted 01-05-2017 07:19 PM

Black and Decker also just purchased Irwin and Lenox Tool. Expect some price drops in Irwin tool before B&D find the niche they want Irwin in. Lenox I think will stay in the blade category but we’ll see what the do with he companies. I hope quality remains the same…... B&D is sure nocking out competition with this Craftsman buy

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6847 posts in 3364 days


#16 posted 01-05-2017 07:57 PM

Black & Decker merged with Stanley Works to become Stanley Black & Decker in 2010.

Black & Decker’s hardware and home improvement division includes the following brand names:
  • DeWalt
  • Porter-Cable
  • Emhart Teknologies
  • Oldham Blades
  • Black and Decker Firestorm
  • Vector
  • DustBuster

They also sold a bunch of other familiar names:

  • Delta Machinery (sold to Chang Type Industrial)
  • DeVilbiss Air Power (sold MAT Holdings)
  • Kwikset (sold to Spectrum Brands)
  • Baldwin (sold to Spectrum Brands)
  • Weiser Lock (sold to Spectrum Brands)
  • Price Pfister (sold to Spectrum Brands)

Spectrum Brands, formerly known as RayoVac, also has a lot of familiar brand names.

The only thing wrong with Craftsman now being totally owned by B&D is less completion for quality and/price!

You can also do the same thing I did, Googled it.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3365 days


#17 posted 01-05-2017 08:49 PM

I have been a mechanic since 1973. Most of my hand tools are Craftsman because of their quality and warrenty. I guess before long if I break a socket, I will just walk into any Walmart and replace it! I don’t think so…. Sears/Kmart has been struggling for quite a while now. They closed several Kmarts around this area. Sears will blow this 2 billion then close up for good. I believe we are looking at the end of one of America’s oldest retailers.

View OSB's profile

OSB

147 posts in 522 days


#18 posted 01-05-2017 09:18 PM



Craftsman has long (always?) been a house brand name draped over others products si begs the question: what really is being lost here? Nostalgia will be the biggest casualty. All of this heartless objectivism aside: I m bummed that an old favorite brand (such as it was) will now salute a different flag and likely lose the cachet that long drew me to their tools.

- fuigb


That is true but they used to be products made in the USA and they used to be under the umbrella of a retailer that seemed to be too big to fail. My personal opinion is that they managed to maintain the quality of their hand tools until recently.

I hope I’m wrong but it seems like they are headed down the road to tools made so cheaply that they don’t worry about warranty returns and a bunch of people get let down in the middle of a job.

That is a loss to the consumer.

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

896 posts in 2433 days


#19 posted 01-05-2017 09:53 PM

To the bigger picture … the demise of Sears has been interesting. It amazes me that there was no one in Sears management in the late 80’s and early 90’s that had any vision of what the internet would become. If there was ever a company that that had the built in infrastructure and business model to become Amazon.com, it was Sears.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3365 days


#20 posted 01-05-2017 10:11 PM



To the bigger picture … the demise of Sears has been interesting. It amazes me that there was no one in Sears management in the late 80 s and early 90 s that had any vision of what the internet would become. If there was ever a company that that had the built in infrastructure and business model to become Amazon.com, it was Sears.

- muleskinner


+1 for sure.

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

578 posts in 1931 days


#21 posted 01-05-2017 10:35 PM


To the bigger picture … the demise of Sears has been interesting. It amazes me that there was no one in Sears management in the late 80 s and early 90 s that had any vision of what the internet would become. If there was ever a company that that had the built in infrastructure and business model to become Amazon.com, it was Sears.

- muleskinner

They unfortunately didn’t change with the times and went after the wrong less income earning individuals that live for layaway plans. They have been for some time a model of what not to do. Selling off branded items to make capitol, entering unfavorable leasing deals, utilization of management with no retail experience/understanding, expanded outside of their area of expertise, and inability to keep good employees, etc… All during that time you had an explosion of competition more focused on specifics Home Depot, Lowe’s, Menard’s, Wal Mart, Target, etc… utilizing better technology, better business models, with better people.

Sears and Kmarts have been as long as I can recall the type places you feel like you need a delousing after entering the store. They just ooze an upscale trailer trash vibe.

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

481 posts in 2954 days


#22 posted 01-05-2017 10:36 PM



To the bigger picture … the demise of Sears has been interesting. It amazes me that there was no one in Sears management in the late 80 s and early 90 s that had any vision of what the internet would become. If there was ever a company that that had the built in infrastructure and business model to become Amazon.com, it was Sears.

- muleskinner

You nailed it: the danger in being big giant monster is that there isnt a driving fear and then the next thing you knock w that invincible monster turns out to be a dinosaur.

The domestic auto OEMs seem to be avoiding this old trap with their forays into ride sharing and vehicles linked to our devices. Very interesting how Sears is nearly kaput but the OEMs (with a big lifeline) are looking beyond the old biz models.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

View TheDane's profile (online now)

TheDane

5423 posts in 3659 days


#23 posted 01-05-2017 10:53 PM

Here’s the WSJ story … http://lumberjocks.com/topics/197218

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

578 posts in 1931 days


#24 posted 01-05-2017 11:02 PM



Here s the WSJ story … http://lumberjocks.com/topics/197218

- TheDane

Hey one of those so favorable leasing deals they do. They also have sold profitable store locations and the lease back the store.

View Belford's profile

Belford

76 posts in 504 days


#25 posted 01-05-2017 11:06 PM

As far as I’m concerned all Craftsman tools made anywhere but in America are junk, pure junk. The only place to buy quality Craftsman Tools is at garage/yard sales. The old Craftsman and Snap-On Tools will be snapped up within the first five minutes. The new craftsman will still be there when the sale ends.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117090 posts in 3573 days


#26 posted 01-06-2017 12:00 AM

I stopped buying Crapsman tools 20 years ago except wrenches and measuring tapes when the refused to take back a defective measuring tape I knew their lifetime guarantee idea was no longer a reality.
In my opinion, the only place craftsman tools can go is up in quality because their already at the bottom of the quality hill, and their service department was minus ten stars starting 20 years ago. Sears who use to be the #1 retailer in America has made nothing but bad choices for years as the death of baby boomers progresses it will mean there are no more customes with fond memories of the good old Sears and thus the final nail in Sears coffin.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

View MPMaint's profile

MPMaint

49 posts in 882 days


#27 posted 01-06-2017 12:24 AM

Sears and Kmarts have been as long as I can recall the type places you feel like you need a delousing after entering the store. They just ooze an upscale trailer trash vibe.

- TravisH

LMFAO…You hit the nail right on the head!

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1330 posts in 1220 days


#28 posted 01-06-2017 12:32 AM



To the bigger picture … the demise of Sears has been interesting. It amazes me that there was no one in Sears management in the late 80 s and early 90 s that had any vision of what the internet would become. If there was ever a company that that had the built in infrastructure and business model to become Amazon.com, it was Sears.

- muleskinner

They actually were the Amazon back in the day with their catalog. Just about anything imaginable could be ordered and shipped to your house. Even Patton, when he needed tank parts and couldn’t get them from the Army, ordered them from Sears.

Just goes to show that there’s a rise and fall to any and everything.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 588 days


#29 posted 01-06-2017 01:06 AM



Well it was bound to happen.

Since the education system no longer feels it is important to continue to have vocational/shop classes there will no longer be anyone who knows what makes a quality tool or how to use them.

- lew


What does educational system have to do with how to use tools? That is not rocket science if you like it you will learn yourself, if not no school will help you.

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3365 days


#30 posted 01-06-2017 01:11 AM

You’re so right Jim, it was about 20 years ago that they upgraded their computer system and downgraded their tool warrenties. Tools like Torque wrenches and bolt cutters used to be included and that is when they stopped. I have a letter signed by a Sears store manager that makes them replace my bolt cutters anytime I damage them, I had them since they were lifetime warrented and that manager remembered them and wrote the letter. He’s gone, but with the letterhead on the letter they still honor it….....until now I guess.

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patcollins

1685 posts in 2861 days


#31 posted 01-06-2017 01:24 AM

Their home services were a joke, my parents bought a really nice door and security storm door from Sears in the 1980’s. The doors themselves were absolutely beautiful, the installer left something to be desired and after three tries finally got it right but my dad still wasn’t really happy with the installation.

The storm door had a hammerite finish on it that was supposedly guaranteed for life, however around 2000 it began to flake off because the steel began to rust. Sears kept trying to deny that rust was covered. My mom, she is like a pitbull when she doesn’t get a satisfactory answer and kept on and kept on until finally they sent someone out to look at the door. His answer was to tell my mom to paint it with some rustoleum, she told him where he could put that rustoleum and chased him off. Then she did the same to the store manager, district manager etc.

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RogR

110 posts in 861 days


#32 posted 01-06-2017 01:58 AM


To the bigger picture … the demise of Sears has been interesting. It amazes me that there was no one in Sears management in the late 80 s and early 90 s that had any vision of what the internet would become. If there was ever a company that that had the built in infrastructure and business model to become Amazon.com, it was Sears.

- muleskinner

They actually were the Amazon back in the day with their catalog. Just about anything imaginable could be ordered and shipped to your house.

- AZWoody


This. When a dominant company falls to the bottom, it’s pretty hard to look past bad management as the cause. They had brand loyalty, a vast consumer database, an extremely diverse product set and a hundred years of history behind them. At every turning point they seemed to turn in exactly the wrong direction. I can only assume they have had a series of “leaders” interested only in riding it a little further into the hole. Spectacular failures of vision.

View OSB's profile

OSB

147 posts in 522 days


#33 posted 01-06-2017 02:00 AM


Well it was bound to happen.

Since the education system no longer feels it is important to continue to have vocational/shop classes there will no longer be anyone who knows what makes a quality tool or how to use them.

- lew

What does educational system have to do with how to use tools? That is not rocket science if you like it you will learn yourself, if not no school will help you.

- Carloz

Do you think a millennial hipster can tell the difference between Harbor Freight and Snap On? You can barely get them to drive a car.

I was not lucky enough to attend schools with a shop class, I had to learn myself. That was rare back then it’s almost unheard of now. We are rapidly becoming a country of Baristas and computer geeks.

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papadan

3584 posts in 3365 days


#34 posted 01-06-2017 02:45 AM


. We are rapidly becoming a country of Baristas and computer geeks.

- OSB


I read an article about education and technology. They claim that for 80% of the grade school children now, their jobs of the future have not been invented yet. I can’t imagine what they will be doing.

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1567 posts in 3561 days


#35 posted 01-06-2017 10:58 AM

Actually Sears did change with the times, to a credit company. In the 90’s store sales were in decline but the profits from credit card were keeping them afloat. Now they are paying the price for that decision.

I have not been a fan of modern Craftsman tools, love the old stuff.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4764 posts in 3240 days


#36 posted 01-07-2017 12:18 AM

I remember when you could return a tool (not power tool) with the Craftsman name on it and it would be replaced free; no questions asked. Today, if you return a ratchet wrench, parts will have to be replaced at your expense. Snap-on still honors free replacement.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

10382 posts in 3644 days


#37 posted 01-07-2017 12:22 AM

one word: patents

View GAwoodworker's profile

GAwoodworker

36 posts in 765 days


#38 posted 01-07-2017 12:24 AM

Read in the paper today that Black & Decker plans to open a Craftsman manufacturing plant in the US and no longer outsource it. Do you think “American Made” will still hold the quality of what it was?

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

10382 posts in 3644 days


#39 posted 01-07-2017 12:30 AM

You know, B&D has manufactured in a lot
of EU countries. I think they really know what
they are doing with tool patents and they can
build to hit any price point.

We have to admit that Craftsman power tool
price points have been kind of low. DeWalt is
better across most of its range, but that’s no
surprise. With B&D you get what you pay for,
in my experience. They’ve acquired a KMart-quality
reputation on the B&D brand but I have both
PC and DeWalt stuff made by B&D and I think
that while PC isn’t what it was when it was
made stateside, the quality today is not bad
for the pricepoint, which is in line with Hitachi.

View OSB's profile

OSB

147 posts in 522 days


#40 posted 01-07-2017 01:18 AM

Looking at the current market, it will be difficult for B&D to raise the bar on Craftsman quality.

If you look at wrenches, Craftsman has remained pretty consistent since the 70s or 80s and introduced a professional line. Harbor freight undercuts them on price and has quality approaching the professional line.

Returning manufacturing to the US is not likely a cost reduction measure so unless they decide to cut profit (Sears probably used Craftsman as a door buster with little profit very often), I don’t see them reducing prices.

I bet there will be a lot of tools that become available as either Craftsman or Black & Decker, I doubt the quality will be much better than present day B&D.

If we start seeing crossover with the DeWalt and Porter Cable lines I would be very surprised.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6847 posts in 3364 days


#41 posted 01-07-2017 10:19 PM

My biggest concern is that B&D/Stanley/DeWalt/PorterCable is that there less choice and, as with all “mergers” like this, quality is typicaly first to suffer!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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GR8HUNTER

3821 posts in 709 days


#42 posted 01-07-2017 10:44 PM

Craftsman tools traditionally come with a lifetime guarantee. A Stanley Black and Decker spokesman said, at this point, they’re unsure if that lifetime guarantee will continue.

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

653 posts in 3318 days


#43 posted 01-07-2017 10:53 PM



My biggest concern is that B&D/Stanley/DeWalt/PorterCable is that there less choice and, as with all “mergers” like this, quality is typicaly first to suffer!

- oldnovice

As the selection of traditional American brands declines the ease of obtaining European tools increases. Even the quality and certainly the innovation and ergonomics of Craftsman at its best pale in comparison to many of the European mechanics tools. If you want a wide selection of very high quality tools that are a pleasure to use look to brands like Wera, NWS, Knipex, Wiha, Felo etc and you won’t miss Craftsman at all. People constantly bemoan the quality of tools but there are high quality tools in every category being made from screwdrivers to sliding table saws it is just the Asian tool influx has caused people to forget what a quality tool costs. The one thing I will say is there are not many mid-level tools made now, but consumers today either want the cheapest disposable tools or top of the line and Craftsman having always been a mid-tier tool company has been left out and had to chase the consumer down market.

View Woodknack's profile (online now)

Woodknack

11615 posts in 2376 days


#44 posted 01-07-2017 11:24 PM

The email I got from Sears said they would still be developing Craftsman tools and selling them and that B&D would be selling them. To me it sounds like they licensed the trademark to Stanley/B&D.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

653 posts in 3318 days


#45 posted 01-08-2017 12:07 AM



The email I got from Sears said they would still be developing Craftsman tools and selling them and that B&D would be selling them. To me it sounds like they licensed the trademark to Stanley/B&D.

- Rick M

It is more the other way around as in SBD bought Craftsman and are allowing Sears to develop manufacture and sell Craftsman tools for 15 years without royalty, after that they pay 3%. Sears no longer owns Craftsman.

View Woodknack's profile (online now)

Woodknack

11615 posts in 2376 days


#46 posted 01-08-2017 01:27 AM

Thanks for the clarification.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

516 posts in 1611 days


#47 posted 01-08-2017 03:27 PM

The warranty support has been pretty crappy for quite some time. I’ve handed in ratchets and got rusty rebuilt ones in their place only to have those break soon too. They have been the place to get a high home-owner quality tool for years. But after years of this over-seas garbage they are fair at best. I have access to Partsmaster which is a high quality brand as well getting Snap-On or Mack off CL.

Everyone makes their stuff over-seas these days, even Snap-on, but I still see a quality difference in what the Craftsman brand used to be.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View Woodknack's profile (online now)

Woodknack

11615 posts in 2376 days


#48 posted 01-08-2017 05:06 PM

I gave up on Craftsman long ago and have been buying Proto and other made in America brands. I had an issue with a Proto feeler guage, sent an email and they sent me another one no questions asked.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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MrRon

4764 posts in 3240 days


#49 posted 01-08-2017 08:17 PM

The beauty of Craftsman tools was the availability of a tool when you needed it. If you needed a socket, you only had to run down to your local Sears and pick one up; not as convenient with other brand tools, like Snap-on, Proto, Armstrong, Williams and others which were handled through industrial supply houses. Craftsman was really the consumer level supplier.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117090 posts in 3573 days


#50 posted 01-08-2017 08:24 PM

I believe lowes sells some tools with free replacement guarantees so if their tools are worth having that may solve the run down to the store aspect when you need to purchase a tool locally.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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