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View AAANDRRREW's profile

I've about had it with this Diablo blade

by AAANDRRREW
posted 12-02-2016 01:38 PM


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56 replies

56 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6293 posts in 1285 days


#1 posted 12-02-2016 01:59 PM

This Freud is the one I have. Have been very happy with it although I use it mostly for ply and MDF. I have dedicated rip and Xcut blades I use most of the time.

I would contact Freud about your Diablo blade. It may not be a high-end blade but, even the cheapest blades should run true.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#2 posted 12-02-2016 02:21 PM

I misspoke – its a 50T ATP model #D1050X…made in, get this, big surprise….china.

Anyway, I emailed Freud. I’d be shocked if they offered a replacement in kind or exchange, but we’ll see.

Kreg has sent 3 pockethole drill bits through the years due to me calling and telling them the little tip broke when drilling into 1xwhatever pine boards. Top notch customer service in my opinion.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3341 posts in 1944 days


#3 posted 12-02-2016 02:36 PM

So, maybe I’m dense, but how could a blade problem result in the blade being consistently toed in? Are you saying that the blade is, in essence, in a concave shape? Just trying to picture what you’re describing.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#4 posted 12-02-2016 02:46 PM

CharlesA – I would say its concave to some extent – I measured 4 points with my square, 2 of them on the same plane were concave, the other 2 points (90 deg from the concave ones) were square.

as for the toed in part – I’m sure I’m not the best at aligning the bladed, its trial/error/some luck. But, I’m guessing since I have had trouble getting it square, I could be choosing a tooth on part of the blade that isn’t square…

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5072 posts in 4107 days


#5 posted 12-02-2016 02:57 PM

Register off the plate, not the teeth.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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01ntrain

257 posts in 1217 days


#6 posted 12-02-2016 03:00 PM

That blade sounds bent. There is such a thing, especially if it isn’t stored properly. If a blade gets laid around the shop on a flat surface or the like, maybe something was dropped on it? It could also have come that way from the factory. I’d hold out with Freud on a replacement, or you could go back on the retailer.

I have the Irwin Marples Combo 50 tooth blade. Got it from Lowes. It’s not a bad blade, and it’s somewhat inexpensive. I have several others for more specialized work.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#7 posted 12-02-2016 03:01 PM

Bill – are you talking for aligning to the slot or looking for squareness?

If you are talking squareness, I mis-spoke. I did go off the blade and situated my square between the teeth.

As for aligning to the slot, I was following the procedure outlined on this site and I believe Delata’s official procedure. I did use the teeth, but a straight one, not one of the angled ones.

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#8 posted 12-02-2016 03:02 PM

I agree – I had it shipped to my house as well, so who knows what adventure the blade may have taken…it came in a plastic container thing, but still could have easily been bent.

I maybe check the marples out – I was really impressed with my 80T marples. I also wonder if one of the CMT ones would be a good economic blade to try.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5879 posts in 2358 days


#9 posted 12-02-2016 03:53 PM



I misspoke – its a 50T ATP model #D1050X…made in, get this, big surprise….china.

- AAANDRRREW

Are you sure? The last I knew all the Diablo blades were made in Italy.

Direct cut & paste from the DiabloTools website

WHERE ARE DIABLO SAW BLADES MANUFACTURED?

Diablo’s premium manufacturing facilities for saw blades are located in Udine, Italy.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

991 posts in 3122 days


#10 posted 12-02-2016 04:26 PM

Are you happy with the Irwin Marples 80T? I have a Marples rip blade as well as combo (forget exact tooth count) and have been pleased with both.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 738 days


#11 posted 12-02-2016 04:47 PM

You need a dial indicator not drafter’s square to check and align the blade.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#12 posted 12-02-2016 04:48 PM

Hmmm. The amazon site I ordered it form said made in China. But the Homedepot pic definitely says made in Italy. I’ll look tonight when I get home.

I read some more reviews about this exactly blade (just the bad ones) and a few people complained about warping and deflection because its so thin. If its that thin, maybe its more susceptible to warping and damage during delivery as well.

As for the 80T marples, yes it was great. I only used it a few times for cross cutting 3/4” oak plywood, and the cuts were very clean. Squaring the blade up and everything was easy and fast.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3794 days


#13 posted 12-02-2016 04:52 PM

Forrest blade service can flatten and retension
the plate. That’s all I can suggest.

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

798 posts in 2546 days


#14 posted 12-02-2016 05:01 PM

Go buy you a Forrest Woodworker II blade for Christmas and quit worrying about saw blades

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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Ripper70

1135 posts in 1055 days


#15 posted 12-02-2016 05:10 PM



Hmmm. The amazon site I ordered it form said made in China. But the Homedepot pic definitely says made in Italy. I ll look tonight when I get home.

- AAANDRRREW

I recently ordered a Freud router bit from Amazon. After I placed the order I noticed that the Amazon description said “Made in China” but the price was so cheap I figured I’d wait to see what they sent me. Turned out, it was a genuine Freud bit, made in Italy and works as expected. The Amazon listing incorrectly stated the country of origin.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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bondogaposis

4993 posts in 2498 days


#16 posted 12-02-2016 05:24 PM

Two things to look at. One did you ever experience kick back w/ that blade? That can really distort a blade. Two, consider flattening the the blade washer, they are usually just stamped metal and can be out of flat and can distort the blade once tightened especially thin kerf blades. It only takes a minute to flatten one with some sand paper on a flat surface.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#17 posted 12-02-2016 06:12 PM

I’ll try sanding the washer – good idea. I’m thinking 120 grit or so just to make sure its nice and smooth?

I have had a few run in’s with kickback, but more than a few with it binding up.

I once was being stupid and in a hurry and tried cutting a little piece of dowel. I knew I was at risk of kick back, so I was off to the side….lets just say I haven’t found that little dowel yet, and I won’t try that again.

I have a few times where some material has “walked” but the blade on me some, but it never full on kicked back. I had several pieces of pallet wood (wife likes the stuff…) bind and pinch at the back of the blade as well as I’m ripping it. I chalked it up to the piece being not square as it rode along the fence.

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

442 posts in 2116 days


#18 posted 12-02-2016 06:44 PM

I have two Diablo blades, one is a 24T rip blade and the other is a 80T crosscut. Both work without issue on my old Craftsman TS. I agree with others that the blade is warped. BTW the way to check blade alignment with the miter slots is to mark a spot on the blade, measure from the mark to the track, rotate the blade and measure from the mark to the track. This eliminates any distortions of the blade.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2527 days


#19 posted 12-02-2016 07:04 PM

When I contacted Freud it took about a week for a response and they instructed me to ship the blade to them and they would test it. If defective, they will replace, if not defective then you pay shipping back. To me it wasn’t worth it for a $35 blade without knowing for sure it was bad so I just bought another one. They will probably tell you the same thing. I have 2 Freud blades with a weird harmonic issue and 2 more without it. Overall they are good quality blades. I recently bought a Freud Fusion and the cut quality doesn’t live up to the hype but it is a very good blade. Also those Dewalt 10” construction blades are excellent for the price but they can’t be resharpened, not enough carbide.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8129 posts in 3522 days


#20 posted 12-02-2016 08:10 PM



.... I think I will be hitting the market for a new combination blade before I start building my new fireplace surround – so, any have any tips on a mid-range priced blade that is acceptable for cross cuts and ripping?

- AAANDRRREW

Infinity 010-150 Combomax Lite – Great all around blade that’s easy to get good results with, and it won’t break the bank. High grade large micrograin carbine, excellent machining, nickel armour coating, made in Italy, < $70

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8086 posts in 2944 days


#21 posted 12-03-2016 12:25 AM

If you are using a thin kerf blade and have had it bind a few times it may have distorted from overheating.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2527 days


#22 posted 12-03-2016 03:06 AM

How hot would a blade have to get to distort? L6 steel can sustain many hundreds of degrees for over an hour without affecting temper. Through experimentation I’ve found that my delta blades are L6 or something similar, I would guess the Freud blades are some equivalent quality steel.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Matt's profile

Matt

160 posts in 1098 days


#23 posted 12-03-2016 04:26 AM


Go buy you a Forrest Woodworker II blade for Christmas and quit worrying about saw blades

- RogerM

What he said. I haven’t looked back. :)

-- My "projects" always look better with beer goggles.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5559 posts in 2555 days


#24 posted 12-03-2016 04:28 AM

I bought a CMT recently, 3 -4 months ago I think. Not crazy about it but it is my everyday cuts everything blade. For hardwoods I have others more suited to the task and of course a pure rip cut blade. Everyday blades I see as disposable. Being used and abused I expect issues after a time. Before the CMT I had a Diablo and it went 20 months before I said hey time for a new blade.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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SuperCubber

1037 posts in 2431 days


#25 posted 12-04-2016 01:34 AM

I have the D1040X and love it. I use it on my 36-725 with the riving knife.

I too believe you have a warped blade, but I wouldn’t give up on Freud just yet.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 738 days


#26 posted 12-04-2016 01:42 AM

.... I think I will be hitting the market for a new combination blade before I start building my new fireplace surround – so, any have any tips on a mid-range priced blade that is acceptable for cross cuts and ripping?

- AAANDRRREW

Infinity 010-150 Combomax Lite – Great all around blade that s easy to get good results with, and it won t break the bank. High grade large micrograin carbine, excellent machining, nickel armour coating, made in Italy, < $70

- knotscott


Where are the expansions slots ? That might be a good blade in terms of the beginning of the century but the blade design moved significantly past that.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3341 posts in 1944 days


#27 posted 12-04-2016 01:54 AM


.... I think I will be hitting the market for a new combination blade before I start building my new fireplace surround – so, any have any tips on a mid-range priced blade that is acceptable for cross cuts and ripping?

- AAANDRRREW

Infinity 010-150 Combomax Lite – Great all around blade that s easy to get good results with, and it won t break the bank. High grade large micrograin carbine, excellent machining, nickel armour coating, made in Italy, < $70

- knotscott

Where are the expansions slots ? That might be a good blade in terms of the beginning of the century but the blade design moved significantly past that.

- Carloz

this will be fun . . .

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 1048 days


#28 posted 12-04-2016 02:45 AM

Diablo blades do seem to be going downhill a little in quality control. My 1050x seemed to dull fast and has had some carbide chip off prematurely. Amana is where its at, event the ice series are great blades.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5559 posts in 2555 days


#29 posted 12-04-2016 03:00 AM

CharlesA +1 ROFLMAO

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8129 posts in 3522 days


#30 posted 12-04-2016 12:26 PM


Where are the expansions slots ? That might be a good blade in terms of the beginning of the century but the blade design moved significantly past that.

- Carloz

this will be fun . . .

- CharlesA

...he’s not worth the time spent typing!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#31 posted 12-05-2016 03:34 PM

Update guys -

I had mentioned I had some what seemed like warpage on my blade – I think that is def the case. I can take my hand and flex the blade with ease when its on the saw. At any rate, I got it aligned with my slot nicely on the portions of the blade where it’s square to the table. I had to cut up some old scrap wood (old shelves from a closet) to pitch it and it cut nice and clean and square. I also am working on building a little machine shed for my son to park his toy tractors in – nothing fancy, just some scrap oak plywood, and surprisnly enough, its cutting darn good and straight, even with the little warpage/wobble…. might not be a bad idea to get myself a different blade, but maybe hang on to this one for the jobs that may be less than ideal for my “good” blade and such…

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3529 posts in 2135 days


#32 posted 12-05-2016 05:00 PM

IMHO….I would not use a blade that is warped or damaged. I think there is a potential to have a kick back or similar.I just do not think it is worth the risk.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6293 posts in 1285 days


#33 posted 12-05-2016 07:18 PM

Glad you got it cutting well but, a bent or warped blade can’t cut straight. Well… I guess it can cut straight but not in the same kerf. If you measure your kerf width, it’s most likely a good deal wider than your blade width. I’d be careful in general but especially cutting anything thick or hard. If the blade is bent, you run the risk of binding or kickback with the teeth not colinear.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#34 posted 12-06-2016 08:42 PM

So, I ordered a new blade just now from Lowes (not in stock locally). Got the 10T combination blade since it was pretty reasonably priced and I like my 80T blade, so figured I’d give it a try… I’ll checked for warping BEFORE its installed for sure.

My question is, lets say somewhere along the line the diablo blade I have got warped – it could be from the manufacturer, shipping or even myself… With blades getting so thin, this seems like it could happen easily. I looked around at a few consumer available blades that aren’t super expensive, and they all seem to claim “thin” kerf at 0.098” (it appears full kerf is 0.125?). Can one get a good blade easily anymore full kerf? I noticed the Diablo, Marples and the CMT’s are all the same kerf. Do you have to step up to the $100 market to get a full kerf blade?

Also, now that I placed the order, I’m thinking tonight I’ll take my blade off and see if it’s warped just sitting on the table – if it shows that its in fact flat, then I got something going on with my arbor don’t I?

I mainly deal with Pine and Plywood, so having an ultra thin kerf doesn’t really appeal to me a whole lot, esp if its more susceptible to warpage.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 1048 days


#35 posted 12-06-2016 08:49 PM

A full kerf blade is still the norm unless you have an under powered saw or need to minimize kerf waste. get away from the cheap thin kerf blades and you you will see a vast improvement in cut quality.

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#36 posted 12-06-2016 08:54 PM

OK, which also means don’t buy them from a big box store and go to a woodworking outfit, plus spend significantly more, right?

I’m not being a wise-ass, I’m just searching around for, call it, moderate priced hobbyist consumer style blades and not seeing much for full kerf.

I should mention I have the Delta 36-725, 1.5 HP table saw

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8129 posts in 3522 days


#37 posted 12-06-2016 11:08 PM

Unless you’re cutting something like mesquite that tends make blades drift with the grain, I don’t think you’ll see a vast improvement in cut quality between two comparably designed blades if the only difference is kerf width, and the overall quality is good (avoid the majority of home center and low end junk). You will find that there aren’t many full kerf blades aimed at the lowest end of the market, as evidenced by their scarcity at the home centers.

There’s inherently more chance of deflection with a 3/32” TK blade than a 1/8” full kerf, but that doesn’t mean that most TK blades will experience flex. There are a lot variables in play, including moisture content, pitch buildup, wood thickness, material density, cutting speed, duration of the cutting session, user technique, material flatness & straightness, blade suitability for the task, setup of the saw, etc., etc. Heat buildup is a biggie, and can be caused several things. TK blades don’t handle heat as well, so are poor choice for high volumes and extended cutting sessions where temperatures in the blade climb. Most DIYers make a few cuts and power the saw down, so heat is less of an issue for them. I’ve done quite a bit of head to head comparison tests, and found that the TK blades will hold their own in cut quality if all else is equal (a key factor in any comparison).

I have no way of knowing the cause of the problem with your blade (could have been defective, caused by heat, or some other factor), but I do think your saw will have an easier time spinning a good 3/32” TK blade than a FK. A 1/8” full blade is 33% wider than a 3/32” TK, and takes more power to make the same cut. It’s important that the blade is clean, sharp and suitable for the task. It also helps a lot if the wood is straight and flat (not rocking or pulling against the blade).

With that said, both kerf widths can work on your saw. The Delta 35-7657 40T (formerly the DW series 60 DW7657) is clearance priced from Cripe Distribution and other places for < $30 to your door. It’s considered full kerf, though the spec is 0.118”, making it tad wider than some that are closer to 0.125”. It’ll hold it’s own against some of the better general purpose blades going. It’s about 95%-99% as effective as a the like of a WWII, TS2000, Gold Medal, etc., and is about 1/4 to 1/3 the cost…..so not the best blade going, but among the best bangs for the buck out there in a full kerf general purpose blade.

The Tenryu RS25550 50T and the Oshlun full kerf blades tend to be decent values too for full kerf blades < $50.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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knotscott

8129 posts in 3522 days


#38 posted 12-07-2016 10:38 AM

(Typo correction to my post above – the Delta 7657 is ”narrower” than most standard full kerf blades, not wider as typed above).

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View dalepage's profile

dalepage

367 posts in 987 days


#39 posted 12-10-2016 01:03 AM

I recommend a Forrest rip blade which gives you a perfect glue joint.

For crosscut, I use a Freud Woodworker.

You can’t buy too good a blade.

-- Dale

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#40 posted 12-15-2016 03:44 AM

So…the plot thickens.
Tonight I spent over an hour getting my split rail system squared up nicely – I did ok on assembly, but I wanted it better. After doing that, I took the new marples blade I bought and installed it, thinking the diablo that came out was warped…well, although it may be, I think I have a problem with either the arbor flange, arbor or my technique…

What I did was install my marples blade and sure enough, its not true when I rotate it by hand and hold a combination sqaure to it and the table surface. It was actually worse than the diablo. At this time I’m pissed because I know I may have a bigger issue. I rotated it around a bunch of times and marked the spot on the blade and arbor flange where it was closest and furthest from my square (yes, the square is square). I then loosened the nut, rotated the blade 90 deg trying to keep the flange in place (its a big hard because when I tighten it, the arbor flange and blade move together and the arbor stays put. Anyway, I checked again, and the spots that were farthest and closest were not in the same spot nor 90 out. I tried this several times, then even tried it with the arbor flange. I couldn’t reproduce it and it seemed random.

So, I took the blade off and set my combination square up so the edge was very close to the arbor and turned the saw on – arbor seems to spin true and no play. I then looked closer at the flange and arbor mating surface – I noticed there was enough red paint and crud on it from the diablo blade. I took some fine sand paper (not sure the grit, but had to be 400+ that I used for some bodywork on a car) and cleaned up the arbor really well and then took the arbor flange and sanded the hell out of it on top my table surface. I could tell as I was sanding it some parts were getting hit by the paper, some small areas not. So after I was satisfied I threw it all back together, and although not PERFECT, it was a much improvement. Only thing is now in retrospect, I tightened the blade more this time. I read somewhere that there is no need to go much more than just snug, so I also wonder if my issue was I wasn’t tightening enough to start with. But, I think the fact that it improved after sanding and I saw that some areas weren’t being hit, maybe that flange is my problem.

Anyone have any other advice to inspect the flange for flat and squareness? I tempted to try my luck with a new one, but I’m not sure I trust ordering one from Delta again, considering this one is questionable…

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Woodknack

12369 posts in 2527 days


#41 posted 12-15-2016 04:34 AM

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Danpaddles

573 posts in 2458 days


#42 posted 12-15-2016 05:04 AM

It is a diablo. toss it, buy a real blade. Stop wasting our time. Drafting square? Get real.

-- Dan V. in Indy

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#43 posted 12-15-2016 05:14 AM

Hi Rick, I actually just got in from trying that, no luck.

Dan, not sure what your deal is, but if you read my post I said that I’m having the same issues with a new, non-diablo blade. I have also been told several times over on this site that drafting squares are reliably square, more so than combination squares. Also if you read my post you’ll see I’ve been using both.

If you feel I’m wasting your time, don’t read my post nor take the time to respond.

View oldnovice's profile (online now)

oldnovice

7199 posts in 3514 days


#44 posted 12-15-2016 05:31 AM

Nope, never experienced that as I only use Forrest saw blades for finish work.
For cutting salvaged material I use an old Craftsman or my 12 tooth Credo.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Woodknack

12369 posts in 2527 days


#45 posted 12-15-2016 08:06 AM



Hi Rick, I actually just got in from trying that, no luck.
- AAANDRRREW

Any defect in the arbor will show up on a dial indicator, or you can use a square but there is a limit to what your eye can see, somewhere around .002” if memory serves, (unless there is light behind the gap), and an arbor flange should be better than that (around .0005” or better). I can’t remember everything we’ve covered in this thread but it can really only be 3 things, 1) bad blade (but you’ve kind of ruled that out) 2) arbor or arbor flange out of true 3) bad bearings

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#46 posted 12-15-2016 12:53 PM

Rick – I agree with you. I do not own a dial indicator, but I think now is the time to own one (I might try and borrow one from a buddy). At any rate, I cannot see any runout by eye or with my combination square barely set very close to it with a light behind it – from the wobble of the blade (in my opinion it looks terrible) I would have expected to see it on the arbor. When I used the stone it sparked some, but nothing exciting and it seemed to make little to no difference, but I have thought about it more and will make improvements to my procedure and stone as well and try again. Just to rule out having two warped blades (seems not very likely) I’ll try the other 3 10” blades I have laying around.

I’m pretty confident the flange is flat – I did the procedure outlined in that link and I think I’m good there.

I’ll wait to get a dial gauge to truly condemn the arbor and before any more grinding.

As for the grinding – I’ll need to track down a better stone like he used, but, I’m wondering how nuts on 45deg he had his jig – He didn’t mention anything about that part – I’m wondering if he just tilted the arbor, mated the stone to it flush, clamped it and went to town or was it more sophisticated than that – I’d like to make damn sure about it before I do it and make matters potentially worse.

I also want to pursue a warranty claim as well – I believe I have a 3 year warranty w/ Delta, but I haven’t heard too many good things about their customer service, so we’ll see how that goes.

If its bearings, I’m guessing it would show up on the shaft as well (runout) but I’m guessing it wouldn’t be bad enough to actually move it with your hand to detect play in the bearings, correct?

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#47 posted 12-15-2016 07:08 PM

Well, after 2 hrs of being on hold (I wish I was joking) I got someone on the line at Delta and they confirmed it would be under warranty. They gave me the name of the repair shop in town. Find out they are closed for good…So, 45 min more on the line and this time the person gives me 3 places, all about 80 mi away though. I recognized the one outfit so I called them. The guy shot straight with me – he said Delta has gone to absolute sh!t. He said they’ll call for parts and after 3-4 months, Delta tells them they can’t get them anymore… So the guy took my info and the saw’s info down and is going to research part availability first before I load it up and bring it there.

I guess the reviews and posts about Delta maybe turning things around might end up being false.

In the mean time, I’ll use the dial indicator I procured to ensure its the arbor as well.

Thanks everyone for the help and patience.

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Woodknack

12369 posts in 2527 days


#48 posted 12-15-2016 07:56 PM

Before hauling this thing 80 miles and letting it set in repair for 3 months I would definitely want to know it need parts replaced.

Let’s review just so we are all on the same page because it’s been awhile and maybe we overlooked something. Originally you said the saw was fine with the Marples blade and the problems started with the Diablo, but you bought another blade and had problems with it. What happened to the Marples blade that was working fine? If the saw works with one blade but not another, I’m not inclined to blame the saw.

You also mentioned the blade was toed in toward the back suggesting the arbor was out of alignment with the miter slot. But you never noticed this with the original Marples?

Another thing that occurred to me, loose arbor bolts would cause all the problems you’ve described. The saw was fine until you started switching blades, maybe that bumped a loose arbor out of alignment causing binding and excess vibration.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1319 days


#49 posted 12-15-2016 08:12 PM

Rick -

I agree, this thread has gotten long and off topic, and I tend to overshare and not get to the point.
From the start
1. I was brand new to woodworking 2 year ago when I bought the saw

2. I did not notice the original blade wobbling, but I bought a better Marples 80T blade pretty quickly for my first project, didn’t notice wobbling then. I’m sure it wasn’t perfectly aligned because I was still learning the in’s and out’s of the saw and woodworking in general.

3. After realizing my everyday blade would likely be a combination one, I settled on a 50T diablo because it was easily available. Immediately when I put it in, I noticed a wobble and even started a thread here asking about it and aligning procedures. I had come to the conclusion that I had overtightened the blade because after rotating the blade some and tightening/loosening the nut I got it to not wobble as badly.

4. Had a lull for a few months in woodworking because life got in the way and we ended up moving as well.

5. For the past few months I noticed the wobble and have been “dealing” with it til my last project when I couldn’t take the non-straight cuts anymore. Tried to adjust the nut and turn the blade some to get it more true and also improved my tools and ability to align to miter slot. Cuts improved some.

6. finally said enough (because I believed it to be the blades fault) and bought a new marples 50T combo blade and installed it last night to dismay – still wobbles. Having no dial indicator I can’t for say yet whats going on, but my plan is to check the arbor (and I hope its ok…) and I’m just either a moron in my assessment/install of the blade or just really unlucky to have two warped blades, which seems unlikely. I plan to also try the other blade that I deemed ok, but that was 2 years ago since I used it and at the time who knows if I was knowledgeable enough to notice it.

As for the arbor bolts – good idea. I’m not real good with the under the hood table saw terms, but I do have to loosen two screws (crack them) and pull on the motor/arbor unit to align the blade (it slides up and down some aluminum tubes to raise and lower the blade), but I’m assuming you are referring more to some bolts/nuts that are closer to the arbor and housing itself? And you mention things were fine until switching blades – YES – it did seem like everytime I switched a blade (its been a while since I have) I had to screw around with the alignment again, which is a pain and doesn’t seem right.

As a side note, I’m not yet planning on taking it 80 mi for repair until I’m darn sure its 1. out of spec and 2. they have parts and its not something else.

I apologize for my ignorance – my dad taught me how to rebuild Ford 351’s and Harleys, but woodworking was not in his skillset…

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hotbyte

991 posts in 3122 days


#50 posted 12-15-2016 09:23 PM

First a Diablo blade and now a Ford engine…how do you even get up each morning?!?

Totally kidding around with ya :) :) :)

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