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View Craftsman on the lake's profile

How do you keep it clean!?

by Craftsman on the lake
posted 12-02-2016 12:26 AM


31 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3944 posts in 1847 days


#1 posted 12-02-2016 12:46 AM

Nice job there. I used to work with an older woodworker when I was young and he dedicated an hour or so at the end of each day to clean the shop. Every tool was put away, counters where brushed clean an floors swept. It rarely took more than 20 minutes each day. I really need to adopt that mindset. Thanks for the post.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7769 posts in 2993 days


#2 posted 12-02-2016 12:59 AM

Craftsman on the lake ”...The workshop posted on “my workshop” page looks that way because I had hardly used at that time as it was fairly new. ...”

Well BINGO! I think you just earned the gold star! New shops always look great, and we always take images of our ‘NEW” shops…

That said, I now have issues with just publishing different current projects due to laziness… ;-)

BTW, I STILL clean the shop because loose sawdust is TOO SLICK when trying to park my Harley in the shop (owns 25% of shop space). Sawdust on smooth concrete is a problem… {8-O

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1782 posts in 3092 days


#3 posted 12-02-2016 01:16 AM

Yes … your shop picture is TOO CLEAN. How about a “current state” shop picture …. just kidding.

If you looked at my workshop pictures, they were taken after I cleaned up for the photo shoot. If you were to look at it now with a project underway … it’s a mess …. but I know where everything is … lol.

However, I try to put away the tools and clamps at the end of the day. That keeps things sort of cleaned up.

Once a project is completed, I try to clean up before I start a new project.

My workbench top is another story. Being horizontal, it seems to collect all the things I avoid putting away (or throwing away). I really need to keep it cleaner.

Once or twice a year I may get on a cleaning binge and try to vacuum stuff. Then I may get my compressor cranked up and blow all the dust off the light fixtures and stuff. Then I turn on the ceiling hung air cleaner and leave for a couple of hours.

So there … it just goes to prove that YOU ARE NORMAL … don’t try to change it. A clean shop is a sign that nothings is being done in it or you have an OCD problem.

Have a good Christmas.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View John's profile

John

245 posts in 1661 days


#4 posted 12-02-2016 02:00 AM

My shop gets a deep clean once a year. It is my detached extra big two car garage. We have a big fourth of July party every year, and I clean the heck out of it so I’m not too embarrassed by the mess. Most people don’t understand how a wood shop is in n perpetual states of filthy just by using it. Clean shops are for TV shows.

-- I measured once, cut twice, and its still too short...

View Hawkeye1434's profile

Hawkeye1434

14 posts in 1528 days


#5 posted 12-02-2016 03:06 AM

I think your shop looks fantastic I have a 850 square-foot shop and some really good dust collection with eight different ports running around my shop right now my shop is a complete mess and there is sawdust everywhere I am just bagging and praying for the day this winter when I can actually just take two or three days in a row to do nothing but clean organize and build shelving and have a place to put all my festool,sustainers. If you think that’s dirty you should come see mine you’ll have a heart attack

Recknerhomeinspections.com

-- Do it Right the First Time recknerhomeinspections.com

View jbay's profile

jbay

2484 posts in 978 days


#6 posted 12-02-2016 03:44 AM

2 words….Leaf Blower

I clean mine about once a week. I put all the tools back. hold down all the loose ends. Then I have 2 big swamp coolers that I turn on and open the back door. I block the lower portion of the door and blow everything to the door and sweep it up. (Nobody behind me but I don’t like to just blow it out the door.)

View eddie's profile

eddie

8565 posts in 2693 days


#7 posted 12-02-2016 03:47 AM

to be honest Dan my shop is usually a mess and any flat surface is a catch-all , but do clean it up when i have to because of the narrow little paths i have to get around in from stuff out of place ,,last time i cleaned mine i found 23 pencils and 3 tape measures and 3 pocket ruler ,,and some tools i didn’t even know i had , i dont have a answer for a clean shop as mine is only clean when i stop and doit

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1576 posts in 1877 days


#8 posted 12-02-2016 03:56 AM

I use a leaf blowers much the same way as Jbay.I have two big fans I set up.I blow everything out back it’s also the way a natural breeze flows.

Aj

-- Aj

View iminmyshop's profile

iminmyshop

284 posts in 2073 days


#9 posted 12-02-2016 04:11 AM

At the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Maine, time is allocated at 4 PM every day to completely clean the shop. And because you are part of a group of individuals sharing tools, that only works if you put the tool away immediately when finished with it. Those are habits I tried to maintain after I came home. The result is less time wasted hunting for stray tools and fewer finished parts messed up because they were placed on an overcrowded table and got dinged.

-- http://www.alansfinewoodworking.com/

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 1532 days


#10 posted 12-02-2016 05:13 AM

Keep it spotless by not using it.

The spotless shop owner is OCD.

m

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View htl's profile

htl

3995 posts in 1239 days


#11 posted 12-02-2016 05:28 AM

My home made cyclone I use to touch things up while taking a brake between tasks, plus ….Leaf Blower in the evening when the breeze is blowing away from the next doors neighbors. lol

-- Learn More About Making Wooden Models. An Index Of My Model making Blogs. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4426 posts in 3821 days


#12 posted 12-02-2016 05:28 AM



Keep it spotless by not using it.

The spotless shop owner is OCD.

m

- MadMark

That would be CDO…. so that the letters are in alphabetical order :-)

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View Marcial's profile

Marcial

153 posts in 625 days


#13 posted 12-02-2016 05:51 AM

When I’m in the thick of a project, the shop just gets messy and that’s part of the process (for me). When the mess gets to a level where it interferes with the work, then it’s time to clean up. In remodeling my shop for the past two years, it was helpful to get stuff off the walls and into drawers- as my dust collection is still suboptimal, less stuff for the dust to cling on to.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1820 posts in 2396 days


#14 posted 12-02-2016 06:20 AM

A commercial cyclone, a 55 gallon drum vac, and lots of garbage cans help keep things pretty clean. Things still get cluttered during the middle of a project but I’m constantly thinking of new ways to organize things so they stay clean. Recently I built 5 rolling carts that hold most of the tools I use. This allows me to keep them close to wherever I am working. This minimizes the chance that tools will get carried around and left on bench tops.

I’m in the process of placing wheels on as much stuff as possible. Once I pull that off, I’ll be able to vacuum the whole shop (over 3,000 square feet) in under an hour.

I’m also planning on adding a Festool router or two next year. Hand-held routers are about the only remaining tools that really mess up my shop during use.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2799 posts in 3517 days


#15 posted 12-02-2016 10:49 AM



When I m in the thick of a project, the shop just gets messy and that s part of the process (for me). When the mess gets to a level where it interferes with the work, then it s time to clean up. In remodeling my shop for the past two years, it was helpful to get stuff off the walls and into drawers- as my dust collection is still suboptimal, less stuff for the dust to cling on to.

- Marcial

Yes, that was one of my redo’s over the years. I at least put all small power tools in a cabinet with doors. Everything left out is just a dust collector.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2799 posts in 3517 days


#16 posted 12-02-2016 10:52 AM


I m in the process of placing wheels on as much stuff as possible. Once I pull that off, I ll be able to vacuum the whole shop (over 3,000 square feet) in under an hour.

- JAAune

Another update I did last year. I put all the power tools on good, large locking wheels. That way I can pull them out to get more elbow room and to clean around them.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 727 days


#17 posted 12-02-2016 11:41 AM



Nice job there. I used to work with an older woodworker when I was young and he dedicated an hour or so at the end of each day to clean the shop. Every tool was put away, counters where brushed clean an floors swept. It rarely took more than 20 minutes each day. I really need to adopt that mindset. Thanks for the post.

- mahdee

That sounds like my regimen. I will at least put all tools away and sweep up around the bench before locking up for the night. Light depending I’ll sweep the entire shop. As to deep cleaning … well perhaps twice a year … I must admit I use the same method prescribed by jbay and Aj2 … a leaf blower! So, at least twice a year I have something electrical in my shop!

View Matt's profile

Matt

160 posts in 1030 days


#18 posted 12-02-2016 06:40 PM

My shop is a mess 10 min after starting a project and usually remains that way until the project is complete. Sometimes my projects take months (cause I don’t have as much free time as I’d like) but my rule is I do a “pretty good” cleaning which consists of blowing out the tablesaw, the bandsaw, and router table, putting the tools away (but I’m limited in storage area) sweeping the floors, dumping the DC bin. I do try and sweep up the the dust that comes off the blade of the TS when making trimming cuts that are less than the kerf. That creates a mess!!!

-- My "projects" always look better with beer goggles.

View xeddog's profile

xeddog

195 posts in 3087 days


#19 posted 12-03-2016 07:22 PM

I use a leaf blower too, but only about once a year. Any more than that and I think the neighbors downwind would hang me from a street light. I have to wait until the normal winds are blowing in the opposite direction or else all I would do is stir up the dust and it would simply land right back where it was because the wind is blowing into my three car garage workshop. When the winds reverse, I can blow it out, but the sawdust lands on every car in the neighborhood that is downwind.

Wayne

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2799 posts in 3517 days


#20 posted 12-03-2016 07:25 PM

You people with leaf blowers. You must have garage doors to blow it out of. I’ve got 4 windows and a regular door. I think it would just blow it around inside and settle more evenly maybe. I do use a blowgun on my compressor though to blow off benches, tools and such. bTW, that picture of my shop above is of the initial shop build, before much stuff had been done in it yet.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Tennwood's profile

Tennwood

112 posts in 3260 days


#21 posted 12-03-2016 08:26 PM

As hard as I try, I always have a film of dust on everything. My DC recently died so while waiting for the new one to arrive, I did a deep cleaning. I shop vacuumed everything I could including the dust covered walls. I then opened the door and window (basement workshop), turned on the air cleaner full blast, put on the respirator, and hit everything with the air gun several times. Even then there was a fine coat of dust. Two days after getting back to work it was back to normal.
I do vacuum and sweep the floor at least daily as I have laminate flooring and it gets slick when there is dust and chips on it. I also regularly put tools away that are scattered about otherwise I am tripping over them or shoving them aside on the bench which can come dangerously close (and sometimes past) to pushing other items or projects to the floor.
I try to do a whole shop cleanup after each major project. My shop isn’t super clean but I do try to keep it semi-tidy.

-- Jim, SE Tennessee, "Don't spare the kindling Dear, we have plenty"

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2050 posts in 3023 days


#22 posted 12-03-2016 08:53 PM

I have three dust collectors in my little shop. That helps a lot. I use a piece of six inch pipe as a vacuum tube running off the collectors to vacuum the floor and it does a FAR superior job over a shop vac.

The HF “two horse” is dedicated to the miter, except when it gets drug outside with the Super Dust Deputy to vacuum up pine cones and leaves. A horse and a half Jet tends my edge, drum-disk and spindle sanders. The big boy takes care of things like the lathes, planner, jointer and table saw.

I also have a small shop vac running through a Dust Deputy cyclone to tend sanding operations and that helps too.

I connect the big [four bag] collector to the sanding table, which has sides and a top, and try to do as much sanding in it as possible. I can even do small router operations in it.

Nothing, including dust collection is fool proof, so a squirrel cage, an open door and another shop vac in blower mode makes everything an outside problem. That only happens a couple times a year

As to clutter, it depends on the projects I’m working and the deals I just made. My shop isn’t done (probably never will be). As I add more overhead cabinets, drawers and so on, things get better.

Organizing is a constant game, since I am something short of fanatical about keeping polishing, sanding, routering, layout and other items together for common sense storage. That is a challenge because my collection include tools for working granite, plastic, stained and leaded glass, wood and some metal and mechanical work.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5007 posts in 4040 days


#23 posted 12-03-2016 09:40 PM

I was taught to clean at the end of every day. That’s stuck with me, and folks who might visit don’t think that the shop is used. Oh well…..........Shame on them.
I can’t abide a messy work place.
Bill (OCD…..NOT!)

-- bill@magraphics.us

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7739 posts in 2086 days


#24 posted 12-03-2016 10:08 PM

“Clean” and “shop” ... well THAT’S FUNNY, because them’s two words that dont seem to go together !
.
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1113 posts in 3693 days


#25 posted 12-04-2016 04:30 AM

Hand-held routers are about the only remaining tools that really mess up my shop during use.

Well, that’s a load of crap! No matter how good your dust collection is, table saws and routers (even mounted in tables with dust collection) spew a lot of sawdust! You are showing your ignorance and/or lack of experience.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1820 posts in 2396 days


#26 posted 12-04-2016 04:45 AM

Commercial dust collectors are far superior to the ones you’re used to using. Try sticking a 6” pipe 5 inches under your tablesaw blade and see what happens. The dust that escapes takes a couple minutes to sweep up with a vacuum at the end of the day.

I’m running a Murphy Rodgers, not a Harbor Freight Thien baffle mod.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2799 posts in 3517 days


#27 posted 12-04-2016 11:53 AM



Hand-held routers are about the only remaining tools that really mess up my shop during use.

Well, that s a load of crap! No matter how good your dust collection is, table saws and routers (even mounted in tables with dust collection) spew a lot of sawdust! You are showing your ignorance and/or lack of experience.

- EEngineer

Be nice…..in his shop that may be mostly true depending on his tools and his collection extent. I hate hooking a collection hose to my router for better flexibility and when I use my router out of the table it makes a ton of chips.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2799 posts in 3517 days


#28 posted 12-04-2016 11:54 AM



Commercial dust collectors are far superior to the ones you re used to using. Try sticking a 6” pipe 5 inches under your tablesaw blade and see what happens. The dust that escapes takes a couple minutes to sweep up with a vacuum at the end of the day.

I m running a Murphy Rodgers, not a Harbor Freight Thien baffle mod.

- JAAune

True, I have my contractors saw boxed in with a door to clean it out. It fills up pretty fast.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Roy Turbett's profile

Roy Turbett

168 posts in 3659 days


#29 posted 12-06-2016 12:46 AM



I use a leaf blowers much the same way as Jbay.I have two big fans I set up.I blow everything out back it s also the way a natural breeze flows.

Aj

- Aj2

+1 on the electric leaf blower. I have overhead doors on the east and west ends of my shop. I just check to see which way the wind is blowing and blow it out the door. I do sweep up the big piles first.

View htl's profile

htl

3995 posts in 1239 days


#30 posted 12-06-2016 12:59 AM

I use a leaf blowers much the same way as Jbay.I have two big fans I set up.I blow everything out back it s also the way a natural breeze flows.

Aj

- Aj2

+1 on the electric leaf blower. I have overhead doors on the east and west ends of my shop. I just check to see which way the wind is blowing and blow it out the door. I do sweep up the big piles first.

- Roy Turbett


That’s my method too but use my diy cyclone for the sweeping then blow all the tools and walls with the blower, this gets all the stuff around the legs and corners I would miss with the vac.

Super fast and fun really.

-- Learn More About Making Wooden Models. An Index Of My Model making Blogs. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View WearyTraveler's profile

WearyTraveler

4 posts in 1018 days


#31 posted 12-06-2016 01:42 AM

I try really hard to clean my shop before finishing for the day. Not OCD clean – I put away the tools and sweep off the bench and sweep the floor. There’s a layer of dust on the shelves and seldom used tools. But I think more important to have a clean shop and know where my tools are (5 S anyone?)

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