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All Replies on Joint Maker Pro from Bridge City Tools

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View russv's profile

Joint Maker Pro from Bridge City Tools

by russv
posted 1667 days ago


30 replies so far

View Jeison's profile

Jeison

947 posts in 1739 days


#1 posted 1667 days ago

http://www.bridgecitytools.com/Products/Jointmaker+/Jointmaker+Pro+v2

I thought it looked really interesting until I saw the $1200 price tag :(

-- - Jei, Rockford IL - When in doubt, spray it with WD-40 and wrap it with duct tape. The details will attend to themselves.

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1801 days


#2 posted 1667 days ago

i keep wondering why one can’t make one? it looks easy to make except for the blade height adjustment.

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View UnionLabel's profile

UnionLabel

660 posts in 1832 days


#3 posted 1667 days ago

I like your attitude russv. For 1,200 dollars, I thought there were at least a 5 year supply of Geisha girls included to massage your arm from cranking.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1467 posts in 2196 days


#4 posted 1667 days ago

I remember seeing a video a while back, I think before it was available, great idea/product but way too much coin.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112014 posts in 2208 days


#5 posted 1667 days ago

I think it’s unique but it’s something I would never own.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1801 days


#6 posted 1667 days ago

a question . . .

would you make it instead of buy it? for example, buy a router table or build your own?

when i look to buy a tool, i do evaluate if i can make it beter or/and cheaper. sometimes, people want to make so much money on their idea, they forget, they need to make it better and cheaper than you can make it for yourself. if i only want to make one, that’s ok, if i want to make money off their idea, that’s wrong. that is how it works.

i have been looking at the JMP and am not convinced that i can’t make it alot cheaper than i can buy it. the whole thing is built on the japanese saw (or any saw) concept.

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1467 posts in 2196 days


#7 posted 1667 days ago

Not sure I could make one and still have all the adjustment capabilities. It really is quality unique product, a 90 degree cut would be one thing but making all the angle cuts is another.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14724 posts in 2307 days


#8 posted 1667 days ago

I think it is a great idea, but the price is a little too tall for the amount of use it would get.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2385 days


#9 posted 1667 days ago

I think that taking older contractor saw pulling the motor out. Weld a small rectangular plate steel too the arbor. Tap a couple of holes though said steel plate at 10-15 degree angle from each other, too attach the saw blade to, should just about to do it….

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View Chelios's profile

Chelios

567 posts in 1697 days


#10 posted 1667 days ago

Very nice and innovative tool. I would love to have one but I would only be willing to pay $120 for it tops not 10x as much. I don’t think one can get a return on this type of jig. It is really limited compared to what my $500 table saw can tackle.

View Raymondz's profile

Raymondz

64 posts in 2245 days


#11 posted 1667 days ago

It’s $1545 if you want to buy it assembled.

-- - Ray

View hokieman's profile

hokieman

163 posts in 2385 days


#12 posted 1667 days ago

I’ve seen it at a Lie Nielsen show in Austin. I wasn’t impressed. Where is the challenge? $1200 for something that you have to tell people that you didn’t make them, you have some tool that does it for you?

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14724 posts in 2307 days


#13 posted 1667 days ago

Why would it be any different than using a router with dovetail bit? The tool does it for you, eh?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View jerryz's profile

jerryz

164 posts in 1910 days


#14 posted 1667 days ago

wildly overpriced for what it is, for that amount of money it should be gold plated for pete’s sake..hehe

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14724 posts in 2307 days


#15 posted 1667 days ago

Everything on the site is that way as I remember :-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View mvflaim's profile

mvflaim

183 posts in 1722 days


#16 posted 1667 days ago

Bridge City Tools are made and marketed for either old men tool collectors or top level corp executives who dabble in woodworking. Of all their tools that I’ve seen sold in aftermarket, I have never seen one that had any user marks on it.

-- http://mvflaim.wordpress.com/

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2697 posts in 1918 days


#17 posted 1667 days ago

mvflaim—I didn’t realize 40 was old (That’s about when I bought my first Bridge City Tools) And I’m am certainly not a top level executive. I’m just a guy that appreciates quality tools. I invite you to come to my shop and see my tools. There is hardly a day that I don’t use at least one of them.

Personally, I don’t think Bridge City Tools are overpriced—-for what it takes to make them. I do agree that it’s an incredible amount of money to pay for tools. Woodworking is my passion, and my tools are part of that passion—-I’ll bet I spend way less in a years time than an avid golfer or fisherman, and I have something to pass on to my son and son-in-law (who also appreciate the tools for what they are) You are right though, I am a collector. I happen to also use what I have collected.

All that said, I don’t own the Joint Maker, and at this point I don’t intend to. That particular tool doesn’t interest me like most of their tools do.

Interesting that we will so often take advantage of the fantastic engineering that goes into Bridge City Tools, and then slam the company for trying to charge a reasonable price for what they do. And then we complain about “Cheap Chinese Crap”. Hmmm, I wonder which companies are really making the money. If high end tools are not for you, I totally understand. We all have priorities in how we spend our money. I will sacrifice in other areas in order to buy the tools that are important to me. That’s just me. Does that make me stupid? Judging from the majority of comments on any thread pertaining to Bridge City, probably so. If you don’t see the value in Bridge City or any other expensive tool, don’t buy them. If you can copy them, go for it. I am anxious to see some of you do that. It was done on the Kerf-Maker, I’m sure some can and will duplicate this tool.

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View TxYoda's profile

TxYoda

3 posts in 1721 days


#18 posted 1667 days ago

I find the debate about Bridge City’s line of tools interesting. It seems that every time someone posts something about Bridge City, the same conversations occur over and over and over.

There appears to be two kinds of people who own Bridge City—-tool collectors and tool users. The tool collectors are just that, collectors. They own “stuff” for it aesthetic value (usually in the hopes that the monetary value will increase some day to sell the item and make a profit). These are also the same people who would own 24 classic cars, vintage firearms, classic hand planes, salt and pepper shakers, and the list goes on and on. Then there are the tool users—-these are people who, for all intents and purposes, have forgone something else in order to buy, let’s say a Bridge City tool, or Lie-Nielsen, or Festool. These people appreciate quality for what it is—-a quality tool. I will tell you that Bridge City’s web site does not do its tool line justice. In order to truly appreciate the craftsmanship of these tools, you have to see them in person. We admire collectors of classic cars or hand planes, as long as they aren’t Bridge City, and admonish anyone that does not fit into some ambiguous mold we have created. When these people spend money on things we never would—-we call them stupid. We ask, “…why would they waste their money on such frivolous things, when this or that can do the same thing?”

The funny thing about this debate is that we get riled up about whether or not someone wants to spend $1200 – $1500 on a tool and yet the majority of people in this county, young and old, spend money each month to send text messages at the tune of a 6500% markup and never think twice about it?

View Dwayne Sneed's profile

Dwayne Sneed

21 posts in 1728 days


#19 posted 1666 days ago

I am the kind of guy that is normally impressed more by the way a tool works, and for how long it will work that way more that the way it looks or who the manufacture is. That said I will tell you a little story:
I had always been a power tool kind of hobbiest. A few years ago I started becoming more interested in hand tools. I do not have an unlimited budget, but I do believe in buying the best you can afford. I purchased an Anant block plane. I spent about three hours flattening the sole and sharpening the blade. I was so proud of myself and my purchase. I could cut end grain like it was warm butter. I was fortunate enough to attend a local woodworking class in which the instructor had several block planes from different manufactures, and he allowed me some hands on use of his planes. One of which was a Bridge City low angle block plane which at the time had never been sharpened, and the sole still had the factory finish. The Bridge City cut as well as my Anant, right out of the box. Price difference … you bet, but there is no doubt in my mind that the difference in quality will always be the same. Do I own one … no. Do I want to own one …absolutely, and I will save until I can afford one of my own. Am I stupid … probably (that is what my kids say). But for me, if a tool works well, it will help me do better work. If that tool feels like quality in my hands and knowing that it will always feel that way, inspires me to push my limits; after all we are building something that will outlast it builder … so should the tools.

-- Dwayne Sneed – Pursuing the passion.

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

529 posts in 2113 days


#20 posted 1666 days ago

I saw this demoed at there booth at IWF in 08. It’s very nice and I’d say it wouldn’t be to difficult to make one. I’d think getting the blade perfectly perpendicular to the table would be the most difficult task.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3595 posts in 2366 days


#21 posted 1666 days ago

This tool should retail for about $300. Think of the nice cabinet saw you can get for the same retail price as one of these.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1801 days


#22 posted 1665 days ago

I want to make 2 points.
first:
I think the JMP brings to the handsaw, what the router table brought to the router in enhancing what you can do without the craftsmanship needed otherwise.

second: and I mean no offense to Harbor freight
know the quality of tool they sell versus Bridge City Tools, I would say HF version would be worth $300 and the BCT is probably worth $1200. If the BCT version is worth only $300 what would that make the HB version worth?

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14724 posts in 2307 days


#23 posted 1664 days ago

Did harbor frieght really copy it?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1801 days


#24 posted 1664 days ago

no, I was talking in theory if HB DID make it, what it would be, Sorry for the confusion

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14724 posts in 2307 days


#25 posted 1664 days ago

The copy cats will steal everything they can if there’s a dollar involved.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Chelios's profile

Chelios

567 posts in 1697 days


#26 posted 1664 days ago

I wouldn’t try to copy it because I don’t see a useful purpose for such tool. I wouldn’t judge someone for buying it. I mean it is pretty cool just not worth the money they ask for it. To the point about why we pay 6500% mark up on text messaging that s simple…I cannot recreate the technology to do this myself. However, for 1200 bucks one can do a whole lot more with other tools than with the joint maker

View closetguy's profile

closetguy

744 posts in 2523 days


#27 posted 1664 days ago

I won’t pay $1200 for anything that doesn’t have a motor in it =). Like someone said, you can buy a great cabinet saw for that price.

-- I don't make mistakes, only design changes....www.dgmwoodworks.com

View russv's profile

russv

262 posts in 1801 days


#28 posted 1664 days ago

comparing the JMP to a tablesaw is like comparing a dovetail saw to an ax.

they are different and do different things.

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

View Sean's profile

Sean

156 posts in 2247 days


#29 posted 1664 days ago

Wish I had one a few years ago. shop was in basement, everytime i turned on the saw i had people in the house complaining about the noise.
I think Barry’s right, for specific work it would be a Godsend.
I think the owner’s comment about why his tools cost so much says it all. you could have bookshelves made out of cinderblocks and 2×6’s, if cost is that important to you. But how many of us out here love to take expensive materials and spend hours upon hours making something beautiful? His tools are art, useable, well designed and put together art. I’d be happy to own a few of his tools, and be able to give them to my son someday.

-- "Democracy is by far the worst system of government. Except all the others that have been tried." ~ Winston Churchill

View ifixbmws's profile

ifixbmws

14 posts in 1545 days


#30 posted 1543 days ago

great debate!
here are my 2c i will compare what i know best as i have only seen a few bridge city tools since i started this
i know mechanics tools wrenches for example i own a set of 600$ snap on wrenches most people say your a fool!
thats way to much… i also own a set of the same type wrenches in a craftsman professional series 100$ set of wreches both great tools , both get the job done.. but use them everyday day in and day out and the difference speaks for itself are the snap ons worth 6x the price? every cent and then some…. gentlemen true craftsmanship demands a premium price period

-- man dovetails make welding look easy!

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